Z-UK

Zombie or Post Apocalyptic themed fiction/stories.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:57 pm

Nice! Great updates, and bonus, I somehow missed chapter 4 when it was first posted so a “twofer Tuesday” for me tonight! Really liking Maeve...a lot!

Only saw one typo and it was in chapter 4; should read “It’s your fault they’re dead” vs. “there”... Only other (very) small critique would be calling a shotgun shell a “cartridge” which is technically an assembly of a bullet, powder, case and primer. Doesn’t distract from the story line though.

Keep ‘em coming; really enjoying this tale!
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Sat Mar 30, 2019 3:48 pm

This keeps getting better. I like it...a lot. Oh and 91Eunozs: I think I caught the cartridge thing to but a few days ago I was talking to my brother in law about 7.62x39 rounds and the fact I found where to get hollow points(not the little pin hole ones)that load easy and don't get caught midway where the "clip" bends outward.
I actually used the C word by accident. :oops:
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:42 am

91Eunozs wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:57 pm
Nice! Great updates, and bonus, I somehow missed chapter 4 when it was first posted so a “twofer Tuesday” for me tonight! Really liking Maeve...a lot!

Only saw one typo and it was in chapter 4; should read “It’s your fault they’re dead” vs. “there”... Only other (very) small critique would be calling a shotgun shell a “cartridge” which is technically an assembly of a bullet, powder, case and primer. Doesn’t distract from the story line though.

Keep ‘em coming; really enjoying this tale!

Thanks for the heads up on the typo!

And for the point about gun terminology! I know which end to point but that's about it!

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Wed Apr 03, 2019 10:30 am

Chapter 6

Pete followed James through one of the few closed doors he had seen and was instantly hit by the smell of sick and sweat. With the curtains and windows closed the stale air had nowhere to escape and instead, it coated the inside of the house. It was dark, but a single candle in the lounge to his left provided enough light for Pete to see half a dozen bodies lying on makeshift beds on the floor. Bar the slow rise and fall of their chests, none of them moved or showed any other signs of life.

A man got up from a corner chair, slowly, as if his body simply didn’t have the energy. “James,” he said, “oh thank God son.” James ran over and hugged his dad, “I’m sorry, I shouldn’t have asked you to go.”

“It’s ok.” There was a smile on James’ face. “I got everything you said. Pete helped me.”

Pete was already pulling things out of his bag when he looked up at the mention of his name. The man looked Pete over and couldn’t fail to notice the shotgun Pete had propped up against his sofa. “Then I guess I owe you thanks as well.” He stepped away from James, putting himself between his son and Pete. He was subtle about it, but it was clear he didn’t trust Pete. Pete couldn’t blame him. “I’m Jason,” he said, holding out his hand.

Pete stood up from his bag putting on a surgical glove as if it was the most natural thing in the world and shook Jason’s hand, “Pete.” The look in Jason’s eyes told Pete the glove wasn’t missed on him. “That’s a brave son you’ve got there.” He nodded towards James who stepped out from behind his dad, seemingly oblivious to the tension in the room.

“Pete’s a doctor dad. I think. He said he can help mum.”

“I’m a paramedic, but I can have a look.” Pete looked at Jason. “If that’s ok?”

Jason sat back down, and Pete could tell it had taken all his strength to stand for so long. Pete took that as a yes. “I did everything I could.” Jason said, holding the hand of one woman, which Pete assumed was his wife, who was laid on a mattress next to his chair. “They were freezing last night so I tried to keep them warm and get them to drink plenty of water, but …” he trailed off.

“You did the right thing. James, get me six glasses of water and wash these up.” He pointed to the empty glasses that surrounded the beds. Pete checked their pulses which were all weak, but it was their eyes which caused him to pause. Black lines forked across the whites of their corneas and the pupils and irises of one woman, whose pulse was so weak he couldn’t believe she was alive, was jet black. As he held her wrist, her pulse simply stopped.

James stood and watched Pete cover her face with the bed sheet, a tray of fresh glasses in his hand. “Is Karen …?”

“I’m afraid so.” Pete took the tray and placed it on the coffee table. He tried to forget about the woman. He needed James to concentrate so he could get out of there and back to Sam.

Pete took out a box of antibiotics and paracetamol from James’ bag. “Everyone needs to take two of these,” Pete held up the antibiotics, “every eight hours and two of these,” he held up the box of paracetamol,” every six hours. You got that?” James nodded. “And they need to drink some water every hour or so, even if it’s just a few sips.” He made James repeat the instructions and noted the time. It was five in the morning. Pete lifted one man into a seating position, held his head back and put the antibiotics on the back of his tongue and poured a sip of water into his mouth, massaging his throat so he swallowed. “Just like that,” he said to James while he did the same with the paracetamol. He laid the man down and told James to do the same with everyone else.

Pete gave some pills to Jason, “same with you Jason,” and handed him a glass of water. “James said two people died from the fever. Where did you put them?”

“Tony and Jane. They are in the dining room across the hall.”

Pete had smelt death before but already the smell from Tony and Jane, dead for less than an hour, was almost overpowering. He had to cover his mouth and nose with his arm to shield against the smell, but when he removed the sheets that covered them, he gagged anyway as the smell hit the back of his throat. They were both pale to the extreme and already ice cold to the touch and when Pete opened Jane’s eyelids he could see dark lines stretching across her eyes to black centres. Tony’s were the same, although the blackness of one eye was mixed with splashes of red where at some point the vessels in his eye had exploded and it stared up at him as if to warn him of the evil that was to come.

Sam’s eyes won’t look like that. They just won’t.

---

Pete heard a noise from the street outside and immediately reached for the shotgun which wasn’t there, again. From where he was crouched he watched Jason stumble out of the front door, shouting at whoever was out there. Pete took a quick glance outside to check he wouldn’t be seen and crossed the hall into the lounge where James was looking out of the curtains. “There are army trucks out there.” James said excitedly, holding the curtains to one side so he could show Pete.

Pete was wary. He’d worked with the armed forces a few times, especially after the London bombing when he took part in a few training exercises. If they found him they’d take him with them, he was certain. But would they go back for Sam? He wasn’t so sure about that.

Pete put his bag on his back and grabbed the shotgun as two vehicles in military green pulled up alongside Jason. He was calling for help, begging them to stop, before his legs gave out and he collapsed onto the street. “Please.” Pete heard him cry.

Half a dozen soldiers jumped out the back of the second truck and set up a perimeter around the vehicles. All of them had gas masks on. Jason was on his knees pointing at the house but Pete couldn’t make out what was being said. Two men in white hazard suits approached him, one in front and one behind. The one in front knelt down and checked Jason’s eyes before nodding at his colleague who pulled both of Jason’s hands behind his back and slipped something over his wrists. Jason looked like he was trying to resist, but Pete knew he didn’t have the strength.

The guy who checked Jason’s eyes gestured for one of the soldiers to take him away then motioned to three more to go into the house. Pete quickly stood away from the curtains.

“What are they doing?” James asked. There was panic in his voice now as he watched the soldiers take his dad away.

Pete grabbed James by the shoulders. “Does your dad have a car?”

“Why? Where are you going? Where are they taking dad?”

“The soldiers are going to take you all somewhere safe.” God forgive me but I hope that’s true. “But I can’t be taken. I have to get back to my family. Do you understand that?”

“Yeah … I.”

“The car James.”

“It’s out the back. Through the kitchen. The keys are on the counter there.” He pointed towards the kitchen behind Pete.

Pete grabbed the keys as the first of the soldiers came into the house and he ducked, out of sight, behind one of the double doors that led into the kitchen. Opposite him a utility room led to what he hoped was the back door but for now he was stuck, unless he wanted to draw attention to himself. He crouched down to make himself as small as possible and watched through the thin gap between the doorframe and the wall as James got to his knees. A voice told James to put his hands above his head.

Someone shone a light into James’ eyes before telling the soldiers he was clear. “He might Sarge, be but this lot a’int,” someone said checking the eyes of the people laid out on the floor. “This one’s dead.”

The Sergeant asked James when she died, “I don’t know. A few minutes ago.” He replied.

“We got two more bodies in here,” came a shout from the hallway. “Bloody hell, they stink.”

Suddenly there was gunfire from outside and the Sergeant grabbed James by the arm. “Stevie,” he shouted, turning his head towards the hall, “secure the front perimeter. “Damo,” the Sergeant looked at the soldier knelt by the bodies, “we’re leaving.”

“Wait, what about my mum.” James pulled away from the Sergeant and backed away, towards the kitchen.

“There a’int nothin’ we can do for her kid.”

Suddenly the gunfire was so loud it burst Pete’s ears and he saw a flash come from the hall. James fell into the kitchen and Pete grabbed him, pulling him to safety. Damo swore, then the Sergeant screamed. Inside the lounge Jane, who Pete knew was dead just moments earlier, was on top of the Sergeant tearing at his neck. As Damo tried to pull her off, Tony, who was, until very recently, equally as dead, appeared out of the dining room with frenzied speed and jumped on Damo’s back. Outside Stevie was shouting for help. Pete saw Karen convulse under the white sheets that covered her and large red stains started to appear. Next to her two more of the bodies lying on the makeshift beds started to do the same.

“Shoot them, shoot them for fucks sake,” Damo screamed. Stevie appeared in the lounge but paused for a second, taking in the scene, which was all it took for the Sergeant, or who was, to sink his teeth into his leg. The room erupted into screams, gunfire and confusion so Pete took his chance and pulled James into the utility room, but James resisted and started calling for his mum. Pete forced him out of the back door and into the garden, but James pulled against him. “There’s nothing you can do James, please, you have to leave her.”

“No,” James screamed, pulling himself away from Pete’s grasp. He turned towards the house but an explosion from inside threw them both to the ground. For a few seconds Pete’s senses struggled to make sense of what had happened. His vision was blurred, he could taste blood and smoke in his mouth and his ears were ringing. Then he heard James again, “mum, you’re ok,” but as his vision cleared he saw James’ mum sink her teeth into her son’s arm and rip away a chunk of flesh. James’ scream pierced Pete’s ears but before his mum could bite into him again she lunged for Pete. Pete raised the shotgun at James’ mum realising, for a change, the shotgun was where it needed to be and pulled the trigger.

James’ mum was flung backwards by the impact and span round, arms flailing, like some rag doll but while she was slowed for a second, she regained her balance and screamed at Pete as she launched herself in his direction. Pete pumped another shell into the shotgun chamber and took a few steps backwards in quick succession, almost loosing his balance as he pulled the trigger causing a hole the size of a dinner plate to appear in her chest. James’ mum crashed against an apple tree but by the time Pete had reloaded she had sprung back in his direction. Pete caught his ankle on something and fell hard onto the garden path. Suddenly James’ mum, teeth bared like some rabid animal, loomed over him. The splash of bright red blood across her face and jet-black eyes vibrated against her pale skin and in panic he raised the shotgun and pulled the trigger causing the top of James’ mum’s head to disappear in a red mist. When her body crashed to the path next to him, she finally stopped moving.

James was screaming at the blood pumping out of his arm. His eyes were wide open with pain and Pete could already see the darkness spreading within them. By now the house was on fire and he could feel the heat radiating from inside. Pete stood and backed away from James despite his pleas for help. He couldn’t get infected. He couldn’t do anything for him now. “I’m sorry James, I’m sorry. I can’t.”

The car was parked outside the garden gate and as he made for the driver’s side two of the soldiers, engulfed in flames, ran out of the back door and jumped on James. Pete watched for a second as James was part eaten and part burnt alive in equal measure. James’ screams were still audible as he drove away.

At the end of the road Pete turned left, then left again onto the high street where Zombies were heading in the direction of James’ house, attracted by the screaming and the flames and the gunfire. Pete didn’t swerve or slow down as he hit the first one, an old man, naked except for a blue tie, or the second, a man dressed all in high-vis. “Fuck you,” he screamed as he hit the third then the fourth. He deliberately swerved to hit one Zombie, still wearing pyjamas, and momentarily bounced out of the driver’s seat, hitting his head on the roof of the car, as he drove over the body. He swerved again to hit another, screaming at them as he did, then another and another, driven by anger and pain and a desperate need for revenge. He registered small details, blue dungarees, a checked shirt, a bright red coat, but they were all the same to him; monsters that should just stay dead.

But the next Zombie in his path was a little girl walking down the middle of the road towards him. She looked to be about 6 or 7 years old, her white night dress was bloodied and torn, and she held a teddy bear in her hand. Pete didn’t even see her until he was a few meters away when the small details of the child Zombie brought him back to reality. He slammed on the brakes, turned hard away from her and skidded uncontrollably until he hit a wall. The impact caused the air bag to explode in his face.

Pete sat there for a second, dazed and afraid to move. Everything hurt. Everything was tired. He just wanted to close his eyes and sleep. But she was coming for him. He could see her in the rear-view mirror, her rigid limbs moving her as fast as she could in his direction. Pete grabbed his bag and the shotgun from the passenger seat foot well and got out of the car as every bone and muscle screamed at him in protest.

Back down the road Pete could see his destruction. Bodies formed the tell-tale path of where he had come from. Some didn’t move, others tried but failed to get up and others just pulled their lifeless bodies towards him. Arms and legs pointed from torsos in all directions such was the impact of the car smashing into their fragile bodies.

And on she came.

Pete tried to run, but his body had given up. She was right behind him now slowly catching up with him. When she was close enough, he turned and pushed her to the ground as hard as he could and carried on running but when she finally got to her feet she continued her relentless pursuit. Pete couldn’t go any further. He turned to face her and watched as she got closer. He realised then where he was, the bend in the road that had earlier trapped him in this hell. Pete didn’t think he had any tears left in him but still they flowed down his cheeks as he raised the shotgun, pumped it, like they do in the movies, and for the second time in the space of a few minutes, he pulled the trigger and watched someone’s head disappear, only this time she was just a small child.

Pete looked to the sky and screamed until he couldn’t scream anymore, until his throat burnt like the rest of his body. He thought of Sam. He thought of her dying from this sickness and coming back as one of those monsters and he cried.

He walked back towards the farm as fast as his body would take him, but whether Sam would be there, or whether he would be greeted by a monster, he didn’t know.
Last edited by Coxy on Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Wed Apr 03, 2019 8:34 pm

That was a really great chapter!! To bad about James though.
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:10 pm

Great chapter...thanks!

Edit mode: Cars have brakes...you break stuff when your brakes don’t work! :wink:

And since I’m in edit mode, @Dave Ki: ...too bad about James. :wink:
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Sun Apr 07, 2019 11:36 pm

It could be two.LOL. :mrgreen:
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:32 am

91Eunozs wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:10 pm
Great chapter...thanks!

Edit mode: Cars have brakes...you break stuff when your brakes don’t work! :wink:

And since I’m in edit mode, @Dave Ki: ...too bad about James. :wink:
Thank you ... again! Second time I've made the same mistake!!

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Mon Apr 08, 2019 11:44 pm

Coxy wrote:
Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:32 am
91Eunozs wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:10 pm
Great chapter...thanks!

Edit mode: Cars have brakes...you break stuff when your brakes don’t work! :wink:

And since I’m in edit mode, @Dave Ki: ...too bad about James. :wink:
Thank you ... again! Second time I've made the same mistake!!
We live in an imperfect world! :mrgreen:

Loving the story...keep it coming!
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:41 am

Chapter 7

Pete stood at the bottom of the driveway, looking up at the farmhouse, and let the warmth of a new day wash over him. He breathed in deeply and country smells of morning dew, grass and flowers filled his senses. He tried to forget about what had happened over the last few hours, as if a new day could wash away his sins, but there was something else that he could smell and taste. Death. Carried on a wind that blew from Kimpton. Death and smoke from the fires that raged through the village unchecked. The sensation invaded his nostrils and throat and he could feel it leaking from his pores, covering his skin in a thin layer of self-loathing and guilt.

There was no forgiveness for what he had done, yet he said a silent prayer anyway. So many times, Pete had felt God’s touch through the lives he saved and through those he couldn’t. Was He watching over my family today? He stood there for a moment, too afraid to find out, but as he approached the house, Maeve stepped out from the doorway and the look on her face told him everything that God had to say.

---

Pete sat on the floor facing Sam, cupping her cheek with one hand and feeling her pulse with the other. He noticed how pale and fragile she looked, not like the Sam he knew and loved. He forced her to swallow the antibiotics but her eyes. Her eyes told him that it was already too late. He wasn’t sure how long he sat there with her, but Sam’s pulse was slowing and all he could do was wait and pray, for whatever good that was doing, that her next heartbeat would come.

“What’s happening to her?” asked Maeve. Pete didn’t even hear her come into the room and kneel beside him.

Pete shook his head. Where to start? “I was there … when a woman died of the same thing Sam has.” Maeve didn’t ask who or where, she just let him talk. “She died just like Sam is going to.” Maeve put her hand on Pete’s shoulder. “And then she turned into one of those … things.” He let out a sigh and his head dropped. “There’s nothing more I can do for her.”

“Pete. I … I’m so sorry.”

“James thought his mum had survived. I … I tried to warn him, told him to run, but of course he didn’t listen. He just wanted to hold her but she bit him. He screamed so loudly.” Maeve wiped the tears from her face as she listened. “I shot her. Right in the head. That’s what you do to Zombies eh?” There was no emotion in his voice at the mention of Zombies.

“Oh Pete.” She hugged him as Pete rested against her. She was a stranger but right now she was the only person stopping him from slipping into madness. “You had no choice. Things … I don’t know, but things aren’t right. If you hadn’t shot her … well … she would have killed you.”

“And what about Sam?” He pulled away from Maeve. He was frustrated and scared. “What are my choices there? To sit here while she dies and turns into one of those … monsters. Then what? Kill her?” He looked at Sam and touched her forehead. “Shoot her right here? Or just sit here while she rips me apart?”

“I don’t know Pete. I really don’t.”

“Nana.” Lucy was stood in the doorway. Pete couldn’t look at her, not after what he had done to the little girl with the teddy bear. Maeve told her to come in but she wouldn’t and so Maeve went out to her.

Pete felt for Sam’s pulse and after a faint beat, the next one never came. He kissed her on the forehead, “I love you so much. I’m so sorry,” and pulled the sheet over her face. Pete had seen so much death since … when did this startJesus, only yesterday … but watching Sam die like this left him numb. Not anger, or guilt, or sorrow. Just numbness.

Maeve and Lucy were sat on the bottom of the stairs when Pete came out of the lounge and closed the door behind him. “I’m so sorry Pete.” Maeve said. Pete gave her a small smile but simply couldn’t find any words. “Lucy turned the Playstation on in one of the rooms upstairs. It automatically connects to the internet so maybe you could check your emails. Maybe the girls tried that.”

It was something at least, although Pete didn’t hold out much hope. “Thank you, Lucy,” he said. He saw her scoot closer to Maeve when he made to walk past her.

Pete was weary as he climbed the stairs, sat on the side of the bed and logged into Hotmail but all that was forgotten when he saw a new message from Sarah posted just a few minutes before. He read it through teary eyes. They were both alive, thank God.

“Uncle Thomas and Auntie Jenny are on their way with the boys so we will wait for you and mum”, it read. Thank you, brother. “We’ve locked the windows and doors. We are safe. We just hope you get home soon”. Oh Sam. If it’s possible I think Sarah might miss you more than I will. Pete started to reply, telling them they are both fine, I’ll tell them the truth soon enough, and that they will be home as soon as possible but as he hit send the power cut out. Pete wondered if it sent. It doesn’t matter. Pete smiled to himself. They are alive and Thomas is there. I just have to get back to them.

Pete stood in the hallway, outside the lounge, and ran his hand down the closed door. “The girls are okay.” Pete said, loud enough for Sam to hear, even though he knew she was dead. “Lucy managed to get online so I checked our emails. Thomas is going over so he will look after them until I get there. I’m sorry …” Pete banged his fist against the door in frustration “… I’m sorry I can’t come in and say a proper goodbye.” He breathed deeply. “I love you …” Pete paused. A cough came from the other side of the door followed by a moan. “Sam.” He gripped the door handle. What if he was wrong, what if she is alive. He could hear her clearly now. She sounded as if she was in pain and coughed again as if she was choking. She’s alive. Pete opened the door and saw Sam lying on the floor. “Sam, you’re, you’re ok.”

As Sam slowly turned her head in Pete’s direction he noticed blood sprayed across the room, the smell, that stink of death, and the blackness in her eyes like all the others he’d seen. She coughed again, spraying blood towards Pete as she struggled to her feet, forcing him backwards against the staircase. Pete stood, transfixed, as Sam, his beautiful, loving wife, moved slowly towards him, spasming, as if suffering some violent fit. Every now and then she would emit that screech he had heard so many times already, broken only by the loud snapping of teeth. Her hair that he had so often run his hands through was now plastered against the side of her face by dry blood.

Sam sprang towards Pete. There was nothing in her eyes, no recognition or emotion, but her intention was clear. She was desperate to reach him, to sink her teeth into his exposed flesh. The noise she made sounded as if her throat was being shredded and the smell seemed to hit him with such force he closed his eyes momentarily at the invasion of his senses. When he opened them, she had crossed the room, but still Pete stood there, unable to process what was happening.

The door suddenly slammed shut as Zombie Sam crashed against it. “Pete. Jesus Mary, Pete. What are you thinking?”

“Maeve … I … I thought ...” The noise against the door snapped Pete out of his daze but still he struggled to get the words out.

“That’s not Sam in there Pete,” but whatever she was, was smashing against the door causing a crack to appear down the middle. “Pete, you have to leave.” She had to shout over the noise against the door. “You and Lucy have to go.”

“What? I can’t. I have to … I can’t leave Sam like that.” The noise was relentless now and a piece of wood snapped away from the doorframe.

“Lucy, grab the bags from the kitchen.” Maeve held Pete’s face and looked him in the eyes. “I will take care of Sam.” Pete looked confused but before he could say anything Maeve continued. “There’s a big group of those things out there. We could see them from the bedroom and they are heading this way. There’s a lot of them Pete, more than we could count. Hundreds at least. I’m going to stay here, and I’ll stay with Sam. I can feel it. I’ve felt it for a few hours now. Whatever Sam had. I’m not long left.” Lucy returned with the bags. “You must promise to look after Lucy for me. Get her to Hitchin. You promise? Do this for me Pete.”

“I … I promise. Of course, but I can’t leave …”

“You can and you must. Your girls need you. Sam is gone.” The crack in the door was now wide enough to let patterns of light escape through. “Out, both of you.” She pushed them both out the front door. “Go. Now.” Lucy grabbed Pete’s hand and somehow, he was at the end of the driveway. Pete took one last look behind him as he heard the now familiar sound of a shotgun. A few seconds later they heard another one before the noise was quickly replaced by Zombie screams from the other side of the house.

They followed the road towards Kimpton but Pete couldn’t remember any of it until he saw, up ahead, the bend in the road where just a few hours before he had pointed a shotgun at the head of a young girl, and pulled the trigger. He wondered if her body was where he left her, although he had no intention of finding out. “We can’t go that way,” he said to Lucy. She looked at him, but didn’t question what he had said. She didn’t say anything. Instead she just hopped through a gap in the hedge and once Pete had squeezed through behind her, headed north across the field.

---

The hot sun was high in the sky when they stopped on top of a small hill overlooking the countryside that stretched out before them. Lucy passed Pete a bottle of water and he realised he didn’t have a clue where he was or how he got there. Images of Sam looped around his mind, despite his efforts to block out what she looked like at the end, mixed with the guilt of leaving her and not being able to save her and fear for the girls and what was happening to them. He felt a sickness, to the pit of his stomach, at the things that had happened and the things that he had done.

He realised Lucy was staring at him. There wasn’t fear in her eyes anymore. She looked at him instead as if he was useless. And she was right. Here she was, 10 years old? He didn’t even know, in the middle of nowhere, the world for all they knew consumed by actual Zombies and all she had for support was … a mess.

“Nana said that I need to be patient with you and let you process what has happened.” Lucy snapped him out of his thoughts.

“Lucy … I … I’m so sorry about Maeve.”

“Nana said she could feel it coming and that if she came with us she would put us both in danger.” There were tears in her eyes and Pete felt like a selfish idiot for not seeing how much Lucy was going through. “So, she killed that monster and then she killed herself.”

“Lucy, please don’t call Sam a …”

“That wasn’t Sam.” Lucy yelled at Pete. “Sam was kind and pretty but she died and that monster might have been in her body but it wasn’t Sam. She was already in heaven. She was already gone. Nana said that these monsters are the devil’s work and we shouldn’t feel bad for killing them.”

Pete thought of the Zombies he had killed and the people he had watched die. “You don’t know what it’s like.”

“But I will. If I’m to survive at some point I will but Nana said that you can’t think of them as people because they will bite you and then the monster will take over your body and bite someone else.” She took a breath. “But Nana was wrong about one thing. Patience will get us killed.” Pete was shocked to hear her say that. “I’m sorry about Sam. She was nice. But she’s gone and Nana’s gone and we’re here. And we need to get to Gramps so he will look after me because you can’t. You won’t have to worry about me then.” She turned away from Pete.

“I promised that I would and I will.”

“I bet you don’t even know where we are.” Lucy shouted. “I’m just 9. I shouldn’t be looking after you. I just want my Mam and Dad or Gramps. And what if Gramps is gone? What happens to me then?”

Pete realised at that moment that no matter how scared or lonely he felt. No matter how hopeless things seemed to him, he couldn’t imagine how things felt to Lucy. For all she knew her granddad was dead. Katy, Sarah, Thomas, Jenny, the boys, he listed them all off in his mind, they might all be dead. He felt his throat tighten and his eyes water at just the thought of that. And then what? How was she supposed to get back to Ireland? Right now, all they had was each other and he was responsible for Lucy, not the other way around.

“We will get to Hitchin and find your granddad and then we will see what is happening. But I promise Lucy.” He put his hand on her shoulder and bent down so he was at eye level. He noticed she didn’t flinch away from him this time. “We will do this together and I’m going to do everything I can to get you back to your parents. Ok?” She nodded and Pete thought for a second that they could actually do this. As much as it pained him, he put Sam to the back of his mind. Just for now baby.
Last edited by Coxy on Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:49 am

Chapter 8

Lucy’s hair hung over her face as she looked at the ground and kicked at the dry dirt. “I’m sorry Pete,” she said, “I meant to put the other bottles in the bag, but I forgot.”

For a split-second Pete wanted to smile as he remembered Katy acting in the exact same way when she thought she was about to be told off, but the feeling quickly passed. “Lucy, it’s not your fault. It’s not like I’ve done anything to help.”

Lucy looked at Pete and smiled slightly and Pete was once again reminded of how young she was. “So, what are we going to do?”

“Well, it will still be hours before we reach Hitchin. We will probably be out in this sun for the rest of the day so I think we should find somewhere we can try and get some water. Over there,” he nodded towards a small estate of houses they could see a mile or so away.

“But Nana said …” She trailed off at the mention of her nan. Maeve had plotted out a route for them which would have taken them around any towns and villages before they would eventually join the A505 that would take them into Hitchin. Maeve had told Lucy to keep to the fields and open spaces, and once they got close to Hitchin and on the main road, the army would surely pick them up. Pete thought it was a good plan.

“I know. It’s risky. Hell, everything is a risk at the moment, but we need water. It looks like there’s only a few houses so hopefully it will be quiet and we can be in and out in a couple of minutes.”

---

As they watched the crescent of houses that surrounded a small grassed area, everything looked quiet, almost too quiet, as if everyone was still fast asleep on a lazy Sunday morning. There was only one car on the whole street, parked on the drive of the second house. It stuck out so much that a small alarm went off inside Pete’s head. Maybe we should avoid that house?

“You set?” Pete asked. He tried to sound relaxed, as if they were simply taking a stroll in the park. Lucy nodded and tightened the straps on her rucksack which carried all the medical supplies Pete had taken from the pharmacy. Pete did the same to the duffel bag strapped across his back. In it, Maeve had packed some food, the map, a torch and a few clothes. He could also feel the weight of the shotgun, which he hadn’t been able to touch since he killed the young girl, and the rifle which hung across his chest. Pete and Lucy jumped over the gate onto the quiet road. Pete could imagine there was a nice country pub not far away. What I wouldn’t give for a cold pint and steak pie. His mouth watered slightly at the thought.

The first house was locked but they went through the side gate and into the back garden where a sliding door was wide open and the blinds that normally hung down the inside flapped lazily in the slight breeze. “Stay here.” Pete said to Lucy, barely more than a whisper. “I’ll go in, get some water and then we get out of here.” Pete pointed to the spot she was stood on. “Stay here.”

When Pete stepped into the house it took a few seconds for his eyes to adjust from the bright light outside but once they had, he could see his reflection in the TV. He stared at himself for a moment, watching himself standing inside a stranger’s house surrounded by their possessions, rifle in hand. He felt guilty suddenly, as if someone had shone a spotlight on his criminal act. Pete thought about all the crimes he had committed and started totting them up in his head. He wondered if he’d have to answer for them when things returned to normal. Probably not. After the things he had seen, he wasn’t sure how normal would ever be possible. He’d get away with everything. No one would ever know. For some reason that scared him as much as getting caught.

Pete walked out of the lounge as quietly as he could and stood at the bottom of the stairs, listening to the silence. He couldn’t hear anything, other than the noise of the blinds, or smell anything, except for his own stink, that would suggest someone had died, come back to life and was on their way down to feast on his body. The kitchen was opposite, but he stayed where he was for another second or two, just to be sure.

Sod it. He stepped into the kitchen and searched through the cupboards, one after another, trying to find some water bottles or flasks or something he could fill up. Finally, Pete opened one of the cupboard doors and half a dozen water bottles spilled out. He picked them up from across the floor and started filling them at the sink and stuffing them into his duffle bag. From where he stood he could see out of the window, across the grassy island and into the front gardens of the houses opposite. This place wasn’t like Kimpton. The people here must have had some time to get away and he assumed they had headed to Hitchin where the army checkpoint was. That would be them soon Pete thought. Just a few more hours and he will get the girls and they will be safe and away from this nightmare.

Suddenly a pick-up truck screeched to a halt outside the front of the houses and Pete ducked down out of view, instantly snapped out of his daydream. The feelings of warmth and safety that momentarily filled his body were sucked out of him and replaced once again with hunger, fear and exhaustion. He snuck a look out of the window as two men got out of the truck, before ducking back down out of sight. For a moment, his head started to spin and his body was alert to a danger he’d not yet seen. Maybe he was being stupid? Maybe they could help us? Maybe he was just on edge because he had broken into a stranger’s house. What if this was their house?

From where he was crouched, Pete could hear the muffled sound of raised voices but before he could focus on the noise and make sense of what was being said a scream, Lucy’s scream, came from out the back and Pete immediately ran out through the sliding door and into the garden, but Lucy wasn’t where she was supposed to be. More screams came from the front of the house, high pitched and desperate. “Lads, we’ve got a live one here,” Pete heard a man say. His voice was rough but there was laughter in it, as if whoever it was, was having the time of his life. Pete stole a look down the side of the house and saw Lucy’s legs disappear around the corner as if she was being carried away. Shit.

Pete could hear more voices as he moved after them as quickly and as quietly as he could, trying not to breath so loudly and wishing the beating of his heart would quieten the fuck down. When he reached the end of the house he stopped and carefully looked around the corner of the house. Someone was dragging Lucy away. He had one arm wrapped round her neck and chin, muffling her screams. He was big and muscly and carried Lucy as if she was a small doll. She kicked at him and tried to pull away but the more she fought the more he just laughed at her.

A man lay on the neighbour’s driveway, not moving. Another man, even bigger than the one dragging Lucy away held onto a woman by her hair who was screaming. But he just smiled at her. “Come on love, we will start with those pretty rings of yours then we will see what else you’ve got. Then maybe your fella here gets no more than a bump on his head.”

Somehow Lucy wriggled free from the arm wrapped around her and ran in Pete’s direction and for a split-second Pete and Lucy looked into each other’s eyes. Lucy was petrified and her eyes were bloodshot and puffy. Tears soaked her cheeks.

She screamed again in fear and desperation as the man grabbed her by her bag and hauled her back violently, throwing her to the ground. “Here you go,” he said to another man with bright tattoos covering his exposed arms who appeared from behind the truck. “More your type.” The two big men laughed at that and dragged the woman, still screaming and pleading with them to let her go, into the house next door.

“What the fuck.” The tattooed man called out after them. He was smaller and skinnier than the other two, but big enough as far as Pete was concerned. “For crying out loud,” the tattooed man, snapped at Lucy. “I’m not going to hurt you,” he crouched down in front of her, “as long as you stop that bloody noise.” Lucy stopped crying, although her breathing was short and ragged at the effort.

As the tattooed man couched down, Pete could see a gun stuffed into the back of his belt and he hid back out of sight, shaking with fear. Everything he had to do to survive and get back to his girls was about to unravel. He was so close. Katy and Sarah were just a few hours away but if he went out there, on his own against the three of them, there was a very real chance he’d be killed. Sam, Maeve, James and all the others he had watched die while he lived, would have been for nothing. But despite that, he couldn’t leave Lucy to those men, he couldn’t live with that. Already her screams were haunting him. They’d haunt him for all eternity if he didn’t do something.

---

Pete was just a few paces away when Lucy saw him and her eyes widened. The tattooed man spun around and instantly reached for his gun but froze when he saw the rifle pointing at him. “Hey brother.” He tried to act calm and relaxed, but Pete could see the nervousness in his eyes. “There’s no need for that,” he said, nodding at the rifle.

“Lucy come away from there.” Pete saw the tattooed man flinch, just slightly, when he used Lucy’s name. Lucy scrambled away from the tattooed man and stood behind Pete. Tears streamed down her face but she didn’t make a sound.

A scream came from the house, followed by a loud smack and the sound of laughter. For a split-second Pete looked in the direction of the noise and the tattooed man reached for his gun. Pete wasn’t sure he meant to, he didn’t even remember doing it, but he pulled the trigger and shot the tattooed man in the throat. The impact of the bullet threw him against the truck and he fell to the floor clutching at the wound.

Suddenly the laughter from inside the house stopped and Pete and Lucy moved behind the truck as the two big men came out of the house. “Jake,” the biggest one called but stopped in his tracks when he saw Jake lying on the lawn. Blood was erupting from the wound in Jake’s throat as he struggled to breath, but before the two men could react, Pete stepped into view and pointed the rifle at them.

“Don’t fucking move.” Pete said, trying to hide the fear in his voice, but as he spoke he could hear the fear screaming back at him. He realised then he was in a situation he didn’t know how to handle.

The gurgling noises coming from Jake told Pete that blood was flooding his lungs. When Jake coughed, blood sprayed over his chest and stomach, allowing him to take a short breath, which was just enough to keep him alive, before he inhaled and sucked in yet more blood causing him to cough again. He would die soon enough, but it wouldn’t be an easy death.

The big man watched Jake drowning in his own blood before he looked directly at Pete, slowly and purposefully. “I don’t know who you are,” his voice was menacing, like some character from a gangster film, “but you’re a fucking dead man.” He had to raise his voice slightly to be heard over another coughing fit.

Pete believed him. “Lucy, go inside and get the woman.” He didn’t take his eyes off either of the men as Lucy did as she was told and ran into the house. “You two,” he nodded at the two men as Jake continued to cough and splutter at their feet, spraying himself with blood, “turn around and get on your knees.”

“I don’t …,” the big man started to say.

“Do it.” Pete screamed at them, “Or I’ll shoot you … like I shot him.” He nodded towards Jake who Pete realised had stopped moving and for a second or two, without the constant coughing and spluttering, the air was still and silent.

The big man turned slowly and got to his knees before the other man, stood next to him, followed his lead. “Lay flat and spread your arms out.” Pete said. His breathing calmed and he started to feel in more control of the situation as they did as they were told.

Lucy came out the house with the woman. Her nose was bloody and already a bruise was beginning to show under her right eye but as soon as she saw the man lying on the driveway she started screaming his name. Pete had forgotten about him. “Robert. Robert.” She knelt down beside him. “Wake up, please Robert wake up.” Robert started to come around from his unconsciousness and slowly got to his knees.

“You got keys for this car?” Pete asked the woman, but she wasn’t listening, instead she was trying to help Robert to his feet. “Lady,” he shouted. She looked up at Pete who raised his eyebrows at her. “Keys?”

“What? Yes. They’re in the ignition.” She went back to fussing over Robert, running her hand through his hair and kissing him on the forehead. Pete frowned slightly at her tone of voice, but before he recovered from the rebuff, Lucy interrupted. “Pete,” she said, barely a whisper, “I want to get out of here.” Pete nodded his agreement. “So do I. Help get Robert into the car then we need to go.”

“I’ll find you,” the big man shouted at Pete. He was still laid on the grass but had rolled over slightly to look directly at Pete. “I swear I’ll fucking find you.” Pete didn’t say anything, he just kept the rifle pointed at them as the big man listed off the things he planned to do to Pete. He kept glancing at Lucy and the woman helping Robert into the back of the car, willing them to move faster as the list of Pete’s punishments got more and more violent.

Finally, once Robert and the woman were in the car, Lucy got into the front passenger seat and Pete slowly made his way round the front, still pointing the rifle at the two men lying on the grass. The big man never took his eyes off Pete as he turned the key in the ignition and the engine came to life. Before he got in he took aim and shot the front tyre of the truck which popped with a hiss then jumped into the driver’s seat.

As Pete pulled out of the driveway the big man got up, quick as a flash, and grabbed the gun from under Jake’s body. Pete accelerated away as fast as the car would allow him, revving it hard as he moved quickly through the gears. In the rear-view mirror he saw the big man run into the middle of the road and point the gun at them. He told Lucy to get down as the man opened fire. The side mirror smashed into pieces and the woman in the back screamed as Pete went fast around the corner and out of sight.

As they sped along the country road Pete started to shake slightly as the adrenaline coursed through his body. He took Lucy’s hand. “Are you okay?”

“I thought you were going to leave me,” she said quietly, not looking at him.

“Lucy. I … I was a bit messed up when we left Sam and Maeve but I’m okay now.” He wasn’t, but it was the only thing he could think of to reassure her. “I’m not going to leave you.”

Pete drove as fast as he dared along the country road, constantly checking the rear-view mirror for any sign they were being followed but as he started to feel like they were going to be ok, he rounded a corner and had to slam on the brakes to stop them crashing into the back of a blue Ford which had been abandoned in the middle of the road.

Pete swore and got out of the car, staring at the road ahead which was blocked with abandoned vehicles. There was no way they could drive through that. Lucy, Robert and the woman whose name he still didn’t know had all got out and were watching him intently. He looked back the way they had come from, but they couldn’t go back that way.

“We can’t go back that way.” The woman said, as if reading his mind, but before he could reply she had turned to Robert. “Robert what do you think we should do?”

Robert straightened up as if he was about to make some important announcement. He ran his hands down his white shirt and blue tie, as if he could flatten out the creases and wipe away the blood from the blow he had taken. His wife, Pete assumed, had ripped a length from the bottom of her dress to wrap around Robert’s head. The material had turned a deep red, but had, at least, stemmed the flow of blood. Robert was slightly smaller than his wife, even stretched to full height like he was, but somehow, he looked twice her size. Maybe it was the over expensive suit, Pete thought.

“We should follow the road.” He said confidently, as his wife nodded her approval. “Preston isn’t far away.” He pointed, vaguely, down the road. “We can get some help there.”

There was something in Robert’s tone of voice that made Pete cautions, as if he was used to getting his own way. “We don’t know what’s down that road,” Pete said, thinking about the road out of Kimpton that was crawling with Zombies. He took the road atlas out of his duffle bag and opened it on the bonnet of the car. “We should cross the fields here and go around Preston. We can pick up the A505 here,” he pointed to the main road, “and I’m hoping we will run into an army checkpoint or something outside of Hitchin.”

Robert looked at the map and grunted what Pete assumed was some sort of approval.

“What do you think Robert?” His wife asked, holding his arm with both hands while Robert continued to stare at the map.

“Look … what’s your name?” Pete asked.

“Caroline.”

“I’m Pete and this is Lucy. We don’t know what is down that road and what has happened in Preston. The only town I’ve been to was full of Zombies …”

“What?” Caroline said, her voice high pitched. There’s no such thing as …”

“Ok.” Pete took a breath and held up a hand. “I’m sorry. But whatever you want to call them, it was full of them.”

Robert was trying to comfort his wife so Pete turned away from them and checked on Lucy. He could hear Caroline, despite her best efforts to whisper in between sobs, questioning why Pete would say that. He wondered if they’d seen or heard anything in the last 24 hours. In contrast, he was amazed how quickly Lucy had accepted the situation, whatever it was, but then children always did seem to have a strength in impossible situations that he had grown to envy and respect in equal measure.

“Ok.” Robert said, turning to Pete and Lucy once Caroline had stopped her protesting. “We’ll do it your way.”

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Thu Apr 11, 2019 11:17 pm

Thanks! Good updates...

And the inevitable frustration and sadness sets in when I realize people this nice would never make it. Even in the presence of evil clearly stating its intent, our intrepid hero is too naive to do what must be done to protect the (mostly) innocent. :ohdear:

Oh, and sweat pours out of pores... :wink:
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:09 pm

Not an update! Just been busy and caught up. That's some great stuff. But agree with 91Eunozs. Our hero is to much of a good guy.
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Thu Apr 18, 2019 6:01 pm

Chapter 9

They were half way across the field that would lead them into the countryside surrounding Preston when Pete told them all to stop. “What’s that noise?” They turned back in the direction they had come from and could see two trucks in the distance. A third appeared behind them. “Shit. That’s those men.” Pete said, grabbing Lucy’s hand. “Head for that gate.” Pete pointed to the field line a few hundred metres away. “We’re too exposed out here.”

“I thought you said …”

“I know what I said,” Pete cut Robert off, “but we don’t have much choice. Unless you want to wait for that lot.” Pete started running, keeping Lucy out in front of him and when he took a quick glance behind him, to make sure Robert and Caroline weren’t stupid enough to do anything other than run, he saw the front truck veer off the road and head across the field in their direction. When they finally reached the wooden gate and climbed over onto the road beyond, the trucks were already close enough that Pete could make out the big man leading the charge towards them.

They ran down the road as fast as they could in the direction of a housing estate, the entrance to which was marked by two stone pillars that stood at the end of a thick hedgerow. Pete had tried, briefly, to push through the hedge but it was too thick and tightly grown.

As they reached the entrance a convoy of five cars drove out of the estate and headed away from them on the main road. Bags of various sizes where strapped to the roofs and he could see children in the back seats staring at them, wide-eyed, through the windows. Pete tried to get their attention, but none of them stopped, despite his pleas.

Pete paused for a moment as the convoy disappeared down the road when, behind him, the first truck crashed through the wooden fence and Lucy screamed at the noise. Pete turned in the direction of it and saw bits of wood flying across the road as the lead truck came to a skidding halt to prevent it from careering into a stone wall opposite. The men had seen which way the group was heading, but it was too late to go anywhere else.

In the estate, the road split into a v shape leading to a dead-end whichever way they went. White, detached houses lined either side of the two roads and each front lawn was neat and tidy. At any other time, Pete’s mind would have whisked him away to a possible future where he and Sam would own such a house, but he wondered if any of that would mean anything anymore. About half way up the street that forked to their left, the front door of one of the houses was wide open. “Get into that house. Quickly.” Pete said, ushering Lucy forward. Robert and Caroline followed close behind.

Pete slammed the door shut and they all ducked down out of sight as the first of the trucks drove into the estate and up the road they were hiding on. “I know you’re here somewhere,” someone shouted from outside. Pete glanced out of the peephole in the door and saw it was the big man leaning out of the truck. “We’re gonna’ find you,” he shouted out in a mocking tone, “and we’ve got a little surprise for you.”

“We need to get out of here.” Robert said behind Pete, who turned to see him leading Caroline towards the back of the house.

“Wait.” Pete paused. “Where’s Lucy? Lucy?” Pete called out in a panicked whisper.

Lucy appeared at the top of the stairs. “Pete, you should to look at this,” she said and disappeared from view.

Caroline frowned at the Lucy’s use of Pete’s first name. “Are you not Lucy’s dad?” She asked, seemingly shocked at the thought.

“No.” Pete replied. “It’s a long story.”

“Well I think Robert is right.” Caroline said. Pete saw her squeeze Robert’s hand and give him a smile as if to reassure him, or appease him even. He wondered then if she ever had an opinion that was her own.

Pete didn’t have time for this. “Just let me see what is upstairs.” Pete didn’t give them a chance to argue. He was done babysitting these two. If they wanted to go then so be it.

Lucy was in the front bedroom, hiding behind a curtain and looking out onto the street, but crouched down out of the way so Pete could have a look. The truck he’d seen was now parked outside and another one had driven up the other side of the estate. He couldn’t see the third. Pete watched as one of the men started smashing the front door of the first house with a sledgehammer until he was able to force it open. Two other men ran into the house, each carrying what Pete recognised as a Molotov Cocktail, before running out a few seconds later, empty handed, laughing and shouting. It didn’t take long before flames started to flick out of the front door and smoke poured from the upstairs windows. The big man was directing the man with the sledgehammer to the next door along. Across the estate, men were doing the same to the houses opposite.

“Come out come out wherever you are.” The big man chanted, as the others laughed even more.

“You should see this as well.” Lucy said from behind him and crept, out of sight, towards the back room.

“Shit. Oh fucking shit.” Pete looked at Lucy and wanted to apologise for his language, but they were the only words he could formulate. The back garden of each house opened onto fields that eventually disappeared over a hill. About a mile away a group of Zombies, 50 or 60 strong, headed in their direction.

“Stay here and keep out of sight.” Pete said to Lucy. At the bottom of the stairs Pete could see, through the lounge window, the man with the sledgehammer walking towards the house next door. Robert and Caroline were in the kitchen trying to find a back-door key.

“If you go out there you're dead.” Pete said to Robert who looked as if he was about to take a kick at the back door.

“If we stay here were dead.” Robert replied sharply.

They all heard the smashing of glass from next door and could see flames flick across the front window.

“Where’s Lucy?” Caroline asked. “We have to leave. You can stay but ...”

“She’s upstairs.” Pete interrupted. “There’s a load of those things out there,” he pointed out the back door, “heading right towards us. You go out there if you want but you’ll be killed. And more of those men are out front about to kick the door down and set fire to the place. Or worse if they catch us arguing here. We have to go upstairs. Now.”

For a second Pete thought that they were going to try and escape out the back but, reluctantly by the looks of it, they followed him up the stairs. As they reached the top the man with the sledgehammer started hammering at the front door until the frame cracked and it was forced open. Pete silently directed everyone into the bathroom and quietly closed the door, leaning his weight behind it.

He motioned for them to be quiet when he heard shouting and laughing from downstairs. Suddenly he heard heavy footsteps on the stairs, the smashing of glass close by and the whoosh of fire taking hold. Pete felt a surge of heat against the bathroom door and smoke began to quickly fill the room from under it. Pete coughed but tried desperately to keep it quiet. “Someone wet a towel.” He said. It wasn’t lost on him that Lucy was the first to react.

Pete ran the towel along the bottom of the door to stem the flow of smoke then opened the window. He poked his head out and saw that they were just a short drop onto a single storey extension, then another short drop into the side access that ran alongside the house. The man with the sledgehammer crossed the front lawn into the neighbours and Pete whipped his head back out of sight. “Alex,” someone outside shouted. He recognised the big man instantly. Robert made to say something but Pete raised his hand to cut him off and tried to listen. “You and the lads crack on, I’m gonna head over and see what Craig’s up to. We’ll flush that prick out sooner or later.” He shouted to be heard over the noise of the fire.

Pete tried to think but was racked with indecision at the absurdity of the situation. He didn’t have a clue what to do, but as smoke continued to find its way into the bathroom he knew they had to get out. It was as simple as that. “We can get out of this window, onto the roof below then down the side of the house.” Pete checked the rifle was loaded, just as Maeve showed him. He thought about the shotgun, but he figured the rifle would do just as well. Not that he knew what the fuck he was doing anyway. Making some sort of strategic decision about what firearm he should be using in any given situation seemed laughable, if it wasn’t so real.

“And then what?” Robert asked, snapping Pete back to reality, a reality that really did involve a decision about what firearm he should be using. He still wasn’t sure, but the shotgun scared him a little so he figured that was as good a reason as any to use the rifle. “You said we shouldn’t go out there.”

“Well now we don’t have much choice. I’m not going to lie Robert, I’m kind of making this up as I go along. If you’ve got a better idea I’m all ears but this place is on fire and filling with smoke fast. Out back is a group of Zombies, or whatever you want to call them,” he added before Caroline could protest, “and out front a group of blokes looking to do some pretty horrible things to us.” Silence. “Right now, that window is our only option. I’ve got this and I’ll use it if I have to.” He raised the rifle slightly to show what he meant, as obvious as it was. “I think there’s only a couple of them next door so when we get out we run left, I’ll lead the way. One way or another we will get past them.” Pete looked at Lucy, “but you don’t stop until you get to the end house and escape out the back.” Still silence. “Robert, you go first, then Caroline, then Lucy and I’ll come last. Drop down onto the roof, into the side passage, and stay low until we are all out. Then we go together.” For once Robert didn’t argue and was up at the window before Pete had stopped talking. Pete thought then that he should give Robert the shotgun, but he was out the bathroom before he had a chance.

Pete helped Caroline out, then Lucy, and they both jumped down into the side path where Robert was waiting. Pete dropped his duffle bag onto the roof below him and made sure the rifle was secure across his back when he noticed Robert was leading the others along the side of the house. He wanted to shout at them to wait where they were and stay out of sight but he didn’t want to make any noise. Lucy looked back up at Pete and tried to pull away from Caroline but she held her arm tight.

Pete climbed out of the window, dropped onto the roof and collected his duffle bag, but it was too late. Robert didn’t stop to wait for him, instead he ran out into the open, pulling Caroline with him who in turn pulled Lucy. Shit. What the hell is he doing?

As Pete crouched on the roof, a sickening stench consumed his senses and seemed to burn the inside of his nose and throat. He swallowed at the smell and could taste it slip towards his stomach making him gag and dry retch. Then there was the noise. The air was suddenly alive with that screeching which drowned out the noise of the fire that previously rang out. Now, all he could hear was that Zombie scream.

Pete looked behind him. The passageway was suddenly full of Zombies, each desperately trying to get at him first. They moved like the incoming tide, pouring towards him, but the wooden fence that separated this garden from the neighbour’s was suddenly flattened under the weight of them and most fell through before others behind stumbled into them and created a barricade of bodies. Pete could see just as many Zombies moving through the neighbour’s garden.

Pete jumped from the roof, onto the path, and ran out into the street. To his right, every house on the row was on fire. He could feel the heat of it and the taste of burning, added to the Zombie stench that already coated his taste buds, turned his mouth into a dry mushy paste. More flames spewed from the houses on the other side of the estate where he could see the big man in his truck, but he hadn’t seen them, yet.

To his left, Richard, Caroline and Lucy stood in the middle of the road as Alex circled around them with the sledgehammer. He called for David and Pete saw the big man turn in their direction, but when Alex saw Pete he smiled, raised the sledgehammer above his head and charged at him. Pete raised his rifle in return and for a split second he saw the smile on Alex’s face disappear as Pete took aim and pulled the trigger, hitting him in the stomach. Alex screamed out in pain and dropped the sledgehammer as he crashed to the road, clutching the wound with both hands. Pete was momentarily surprised how easy it had been to pull the trigger.

Two men ran out of the house, followed by a burst of flames, but before they had time to react to what had happened, Zombies appeared from between the houses and they were immediately swallowed up by the Zombie tide. The ferocity of it was as brutal as it was scary and Pete ran at Lucy, shouting at the others to run. When Pete passed Alex, he pleaded for Pete’s help, but Pete just left him, writhing on the ground in agony, and grabbed hold of Lucy. He didn’t wait for Robert and Caroline, the Zombies were too close for that, instead he ran, pulling Lucy behind him.

---

When Pete reached the house at the end of the road he turned at a chilling scream which rang out above all the other noises that filled the air. Alex had made it to his feet and managed to move a few meters up the road, but the Zombies had caught him easily enough and had begun their feeding frenzy. As Robert and Caroline passed him, Pete watched as three groups of Zombies were knelt over three bodies. Their faces were buried into the men as they ripped away at the flesh, eager to satisfy whatever hunger that drove them. Beyond that, at the end of the road, the rest of the men were also watching, but thankfully had no desire to try and navigate past the Zombies to get at Pete. He caught David’s eye and they held each other’s gaze for a second before Pete turned and moved with Lucy, Robert and Caroline into the back garden and over the rear fence which led into a small wooded area.

When Pete dropped to the ground on the other side he stumbled and fell to one knee, exhausted. Lucy ran to him and wrapped her arms around his neck, just like Katy used to do. “I’m sorry we left you. I didn’t want to.”

“It’s okay. We’re safe, which is the main thing.”

At the edge of the trees a road ran across their path and a sign, which pointed to the right, told them Hitchin was five miles away. Pete crossed the road and turned left. “Where are you going?” Robert asked. “Hitchin is this way. It’s only a few miles.”

“We won’t get there before dark,” Pete said, not bothering to turn around or slow down, “so I think we should find somewhere to rest tonight. Plus, we aren’t going to follow the main road in case those blokes come after us. But that’s just my opinion, you can do what you like.”

He could hear Robert and Caroline following behind. Robert wanted to leave and follow the main road to Hitchin but he could just about hear Caroline persuade him that they couldn’t leave Lucy. Lucy has nothing to do with you, he thought, but he was too tired to have that conversation right now.

They took a few turns here and there to get further from the main road, constantly looking out for Zombies and any sign that David was following them, but the whole time they were walking they didn’t see anyone. Once he felt relatively safe and far enough from the main road, Pete tried each door they walked past until they passed a bright red door that reminded him of home and was grateful that it was unlocked. He stood a few paces inside and took a deep breath. Nothing. He told the others to stay outside while he quickly checked it was safe. Again, Robert didn’t seem to object when it was someone else doing the dirty work.

After Pete had checked the house, closed the curtains and made sure every window and door was secure, he noticed how Robert was much more attentive to Caroline. He washed the blood from her face, asked her countless times if she was okay and said how sorry he was that she was put in that situation. Pete couldn’t help but feel that he was putting on a show and the last thing he needed was to sit there watching that. He heard Lucy finish in the bathroom and made to go upstairs to wash the day’s grime from his body and find something fresh to wear. “Will you pray with us?” Caroline asked as he got up.

“I have nothing to pray for. Not today.” Pete heard Robert sneer at that and he turned to face him. “What’s so funny?” He could feel the fear, pain and frustration from everything that had happened flow out of his body, aimed at Robert.

“I saw plenty of things today that you should be praying for. How many people did you kill?”

“Kill saving you, you mean? For which neither of you have even said thank you.”

To give Caroline her dues, she at least looked shocked at that. “I’m sorry.” She said “Of course we thank you. Don’t we Robert.”

“Don’t apologies to him. He’s no better than those thugs out there.”

“Excuse me? I could have left you and let them do what they wanted, but while you were helpless, I saved your wife.”

“How dare you,” Robert screamed. “I didn’t have the pleasure of having a gun. They knocked me out. I would have done anything to save Caroline, anything, but I’m not the sort of person that can just shoot someone else in cold blood. I’m not the killer round here.”

“No, you’re just the sort of person that runs away and saves his own skin.”

“I was saving my wife and Amanda.” Robert shouted as his face turned a shade of crimson. Pete could see a rage behind his eyes.

“It’s okay Robert, you did the right thing.” Caroline said trying to calm Robert down.

Pete saw Robert look at the ring on his finger. “And where is your wife?” At the flick of a switch, Robert seemed to have that rage under control, replaced instead with utter contempt. “Why are you not looking after her like I’m looking after mine?”

That was the final straw. Pete felt his own rage erupt inside him and he grabbed two fistfuls of Robert’s shirt and slammed him up against the wall. “Don’t you ever mention my wife again. Don’t you forget, I do have the gun and like you said I am the killer round here.” The words coming out of his mouth made him feel sick and he knew Sam would be disgusted with him.

Caroline tried to get in between them. “Pete, no please. Robert shouldn’t have said that. I’m sorry.”

“You have nothing to be sorry for. But him …”

“He’s sorry”. Caroline said quickly. “Robert, you should apologise.”

Robert’s lips curled into a sneer and he raised his hands in mock surrender, bowing his head slightly. “See,” Caroline said, obviously satisfied with Robert’s apology, “he’s sorry and we are both thankful for what you have done for us. Please pray with us. Let us start again.”

Pete let go of Robert, unable to bear the smug look he was giving him. “You can pray if you want, but no one is listening Caroline.” He picked up his bag and headed upstairs for that wash, passing Lucy who was sat on the stairs watching.

“Lucy, will you pray with us?” he heard Caroline ask, but Lucy didn’t reply, she just followed Pete upstairs.
Last edited by Coxy on Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:26 pm

Well that was a fast change of heart! Not quite sure yet that it’s in character...may need to develop him/his character a bit between scenes to show the transition.

Nice update regardless!

Oh and “If you go out there you’re dead.”
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:37 pm

Go Pete. Personally I'd lose Robert some where. Great update looking forward to the next.
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:43 pm

91Eunozs wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:26 pm
Well that was a fast change of heart! Not quite sure yet that it’s in character...may need to develop him/his character a bit between scenes to show the transition.

Nice update regardless!

Oh and “If you go out there you’re dead.”
Your're? Huh,who knew. Really I didn't but now I do thanx!
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:55 am

Chapter 10

Pete laid on the floor with his eyes closed and blanket over him. His entire body ached, every bone felt like it had to be snapped back into place and every muscle felt like it had been worked, stretched and beaten to breaking point. He didn’t remember falling asleep, but he could remember the nightmares that had plagued him when he did. He could feel them as well, too many to count, in the pit of his stomach.

Sam was there. Beautiful Sam, who he watched turn into one of those monsters and who he left behind to rot.

Katie and Sarah were there. Alone and afraid in a world suddenly filled with violence, pain and suffering.

And he was there. Pete the killer. Pete the sinner. Had he really done those things? It didn’t seem possible. How could he open his eyes and face what he had done? How could he live with that version of Pete Barnes?

He couldn’t. That Pete could stay on this cold hard floor for all he cared. The Pete from before, that’s the Pete that was going to open his eyes and get up. First, he would apologise to Robert and Caroline. He would put that right. Then he would go to Lucy’s granddad and make sure she was safe.

Then he just had to get home. Everything would be okay if he could just get home.

---

When Pete sat up from the cold, hard, floor he expected to see Lucy in the bed next to him, asleep, but she wasn’t there. Up and awake the strangeness of the surroundings hit him, but before he called out to Lucy he heard voices downstairs.

Pete stood on the landing and listened to Caroline and Robert praying in the room he left them in last night. He heard Caroline mention Amanda and he frowned when he remembered that Robert had said that name when they were arguing. Someone special no doubt, but he harboured enough pain and sorrow for the special ones he had lost or couldn’t get too, to pay Amanda much thought. Pete started down the stairs quietly, so not to disturb them he told himself, but really, he wanted a chance to learn some more about these two. He would apologise, but he didn’t trust them just yet.

“Good morning Lucy,” he heard Caroline say. The way she said it made Pete feel like this was a normal morning, that the country wasn’t being overrun by Zombies and any second now the smell of bacon and eggs would flood his nostrils. But of course, it wasn’t a normal morning and in an instant, that feeling disappeared. He’s stomach growled so much that he felt sick.

“Who’s Amanda?” Lucy asked. Pete smiled at the innocence of children. They were about as subtle as a brick. He reached the bottom of the stairs and could see across the hall and into the lounge where the others were stood.

“She’s our daughter.” Caroline replied. She smiled, but Pete could hear the strain in her voice. Pete felt guilty at that. He knew as well as anyone what it felt like to be apart from your kids right now. He noticed something flick across Robert’s face. Was that anger?

“Caroline.” Robert said taking her hand in his. Pete noticed his demeanour change in an instant to one of concern. “You don’t have to.”

“She looked a bit like you Lucy.” Caroline continued, ignoring Robert. That was the first time Pete had seen her act like that towards her husband. As if he wasn’t there. “She was a little older but you’re very tall for your age aren’t you, so you’re about the same height. And you have the same dark hair.” She reached out and touched Lucy’s hair. Pete expected Lucy to flinch at that, but she didn’t. Caroline knelt in front of Lucy. “I think you would have been good friends.”

“Where is she?” Pete saw Robert flinch at Lucy’s question.

“We don’t know. She went missing a … a few days ago, I think.” Pete was watching Robert closely. There was something in his eyes.

“I’m sorry.” Lucy said.

Robert’s eyes narrowed slightly and whatever Pete had seen in them was gone, but as he stood behind Caroline looking down at Lucy, there was something else now. What is that? It was brief, but Pete saw it. His eyes looked lifeless, his expression cold and hard but before he could explain it, Robert noticed him stood on the stairs and smiled, a broad, friendly smile as if Pete was a long-lost friend, and called out his name.

Robert held his hand out as Pete approached. “Ah Pete. Look, I wanted to apologise for last night. It was terrible business and I was rude and obnoxious.” Pete thought he sounded like a dodgy politician, or a second-hand car salesman. Caroline was beaming at his words, even Lucy seemed to be smiling. Robert shook Pete’s hand, giving it an over exaggerated squeeze and placed his other hand on Pete’s shoulder as if wrapping him up and bringing him in to his confidence. “What you did for us,” he continued, “well, I can’t thank you enough.”

Robert reminded Pete of a chameleon, changing from one thing to the next in a blink of an eye. Perhaps he was a politician or a second-hand car salesman. Although Pete doubted that. Not enough money in either of those he reckoned.

Pete let him squeeze his hand more than necessary and he let him show him off to his wife as if he’d achieved some great feat, but Pete just couldn’t find it in himself to trust him and despite his smile in return and his equally enthusiastic apology for his behaviour the night before, there was a silent understanding between the two. That neither meant a word of it.

“Excellent.” Caroline said, clapping her hands together. “Why don’t you all sit down and I will find something in the cupboards for breakfast.

“Perfect my dear.” Robert said before he pulled out a chair for Pete. “And a chair for you Lucy.”

Caroline produced an assortment of crisps, popcorn, tinned fruits and nuts. “This really is excellent Caroline.” Robert said, serving food onto four plates. “Just what we need for the day ahead eh Pete.” Robert smiled at Pete as he handed him a plate. “I’m impressed,” Robert looked at Caroline, “we’re impressed, with the route set out. Fingers crossed we will be in Hitchin in no time at all and we can get all this straightened out.” While Caroline beamed at his words, Pete felt like Robert was treating him like some performing monkey and had a feeling that was exactly the sort of people Robert was used to surrounding himself with.

Once breakfast had finished, Pete excused himself and stood in the doorway at the front of the house, sucking in the fresh air. He had a full stomach from their breakfast, wore clean clothes and even had a shave, despite the cold water, but a wave of anxiety flowed continuously through his stomach. The girls are so close, but his mind kept going back to his nightmares and he could barely think straight because of it.

The street was eerily quiet and there was no movement from any of the houses. Cars were still parked on driveways, and along the road, and there wasn’t any discarded luggage or possessions that indicated that whoever lived here left in a hurry. “Where did everybody go?” Lucy asked, breaking the silence and taking Pete by surprise.

Pete shook his head. “I don’t know. Maybe the army took them all to Hitchin.” He thought of James and his family, or maybe they are behind closed doors and drawn curtains dying from this virus, or worse. He didn’t share those thoughts with Lucy.

“I don’t like it. It’s scary.”

Pete had to remind himself that Lucy was still a child. Of course she was scared. He put a hand on her shoulder. “A few hours and we will be safe. We will cross into the countryside, just like Maeve said we should, and keep going until we reach Hitchin and then we will find your granddad.” Lucy didn’t look convinced, and he couldn’t blame her. How could any of them be safe anymore?

---

They walked in silence for most of the morning. At one point, they had to skirt around a town which sat underneath a big plume of black smoke that reminded Pete of Kimpton and they gave it a wide berth before continuing north as best they could guess. Eventually they could see what they thought was the A505 in the distance, cutting across their path. Just a few more fields to go through and they would intercept it, but as they were half way across what Pete hoped was the last field, he froze.

Lucy bumped into him as he came to a sudden stop but before she could say anything, he turned to face her and knelt to block her view. “I’m going to carry you, ok? But you have to keep your eyes closed. Do you understand?” She looked confused and scared by the tone of Pete’s voice.

“Why are we …” Robert stopped talking and looked beyond Pete. “Fucking hell.”

Caroline started to scream but Pete just looked into Lucy’s eyes. He could hear Robert saying they shouldn’t cross the field and they should go back, but he blocked that out. “Lucy there are some dead people in front of us.” He could see that she was shaking now. “So, I’m going to carry you and you are going to keep your eyes closed.”

Caroline was being sick. He didn’t blame her. Across the field were bodies. More than he could count. He could smell it now, the stink that stuck in his throat, coating it with a disgusting smell of rotting flesh. Viscera covered the grass and body parts lay where they fell.

“We can’t cross here, we have to go back.” Robert demanded.

“Go back where?” Pete was calm, he had to be for Lucy’s sake. “There’s nothing back there. The road is just the other side of this field,” he looked at Lucy now, “and so is Hitchin.”

Pete picked Lucy up and held her close. She was heavy with the bag and rifle strapped across his back, but they didn’t have far to go. “Keep your eyes closed, okay.” She nodded and cried quietly into his neck.

Caroline had stopped being sick but clung to Robert as if her life depended on it. “We can’t … I can’t go through that.” She screamed.

“You can.” Pete said. “You hold on to Robert and you follow me.”

Pete started to cross the field, careful to avoid standing on something, like an arm or a torso, that would make him fall. Blood and flesh stuck to his boots and he could hear the squelch of God knows what organ underfoot. Every now and then Caroline screamed behind him, in between the constant noise of crying. He heard Robert throw up at least twice, but he didn’t turn to look and focussed instead on where he was stepping.

Many of the bodies had big holes in their heads, from what Pete assumed where bullets. He could see the darkness in their eyes and where the skin was visible, between bloody stains or exposed muscle and sinew, the greyness made them look as if they had aged a hundred years in a moment. Other eyes looked normal, not like he’d seen from the infected, but they too were covered from head to toe in bullet holes. He could only imagine the horror that unfolded in this field.

They were about half way across, surrounded now on all sides by death and destruction when a soft whoosh filled the air. They all screamed as a Zombie, which was stood just a few metres away and unseen by them, was thrown to the ground by some invisible force. From the treeline, at the end of the field, four soldiers appeared, weapons raised, and fanned out in a line facing them.

One of them shouted an instruction to walk forward. At that, Robert dragged Caroline in their direction. She stumbled as they came past Pete and Lucy, but just about kept her feet as she fell against her husband. Another whoosh filled the air and Pete turned to see another Zombie disappear to the ground. More were struggling to their feet, but as quickly as they stood, they were shot by one of the soldiers.

Robert and Caroline had reached the end of the field and Pete saw Caroline fall to the ground screaming and crying in panic, and relief no doubt, at crossing the field of death. Two of the soldiers were shining a light into their eyes and throats and Pete noticed then that each of the soldiers were wearing the same masks as the ones at James’ house.

Pete could see, out of the corner of his eye, two Zombies scrambling across the field towards them with frightening speed. Although they struggled with the amount of dead bodies as much as Pete did, every time they fell they sprang back up, getting ever closer. He heard the whoosh of bullets and both Zombies fell amongst the dead, but one of them recovered and continued its frantic pursuit. Another whoosh and the Zombie’s arm was torn from its body, at the shoulder, but on it came. Pete tried to move faster but the combination of Lucy’s weight and fear of losing his footing meant he couldn’t move as fast as the Zombie that was chasing them.

He could see the Zombie now, just a few metres away. It was an old man who would have looked relatively normal if his arm hadn’t been torn from place, if his irises and pupils weren’t as black as night, if his face wasn’t coated in blood, if his stench didn’t make Pete’s eye’s water and his stomach twist, if his lips weren’t pulled back over his gums exposing a set of teeth that seemed to jump from its mouth ready to bite into a piece of exposed flesh and if he wasn’t making a primeval screeching noise that seemed to rip at every fibre in Pete’s body.

He tried to prise Lucy’s arms away from his neck but when she saw the Zombie she screamed and panicked and wrapped herself around him so tightly he could barely breathe. When the Zombie was just an arm’s length away, as it opened its mouth even wider ready to bite down onto Pete, he saw Sam in the old man’s face and he wished he had never seen her look like that.

Lucy was screaming so loudly that Pete didn’t hear the whoosh of a bullet, but he felt it pass by him as the Zombie’s head exploded from the impact, and it fell at Pete’s feet, what left of it landing with a squelch at his boot. Pete’s legs were physically shaking as he tried to calm Lucy down, promising her that the monster had gone. He waited a second or two and took deep breathes, before he took a step and when he reached the end of the field he carefully let Lucy drop from his grasp and onto the grass. As she did so he noticed the soldier that saved his life step behind him. “We need to check you over,” another one said. His voice was muffled slightly from the mask he was wearing.

They weren’t being threatening, but he could feel the tension. He realised then he couldn’t see Robert, Caroline or the other two soldiers. “See Lucy,” Pete said, trying to ease the situation, “we’re safe now. They just need to check we aren’t hurt.”

Once the soldier was happy their eyes were clear and they had no signs of the infection, Pete shook the man’s hand that stood behind them. “I thought I was a goner then.”

“Nah,” the soldier replied with a smile. He had taken his mask off and Pete realised how young he looked. Or maybe, Pete thought, he was just getting old. “We had plenty of time.” He said with a wink. Pete gave a nervous laugh at that. “Anyway, your mates are through here.” He led them through a treeline, onto a footpath the other side, where Robert and Caroline were sat.

Caroline got up and hugged Pete. “I’m so sorry. I panicked. I’m sorry.” Pete noticed Robert visibly scowl when Caroline hugged him. She knelt to Lucy and hugged her as well. “But we’re safe now. Look.”

The footpath led directly through another field, clear thankfully of any bodies, and onto the A505. Hundreds of people were walking along the road and military vehicles lined the way either side.

“Once you’ve reached the road over there just follow it with everyone else and you’ll reach Hitchin soon enough.” One of the soldiers said.

“Look. I think we deserve some sort of explanation as to what is going on around here. What the hell was that all about?” Robert said, pointing back the way they had come. He had clearly found that arrogance he couldn’t help but exude now that they were safe.

“I wouldn’t know about that sir,” the soldier replied. “They don’t tell us anything important like that. Just to help people like you and point them in the right direction. Which is that way.” He nodded to the road and before Robert could say anything else, the four soldiers disappeared through the trees. Pete doubted very much that he didn’t know what was going on, but he didn’t ask. He reckoned they would find out soon enough.

DAVE KI
* * *
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:47 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: WWZ though nowhere as good as the book.
Location: The Great State of (cough cough)Oregon

Re: Z-UK

Post by DAVE KI » Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:57 pm

Thanx bunches for the rather long chapter. I enjoyed it. Think someone could put boot to Roberts ass? Just saying. :mrgreen:
"We'll Fight Them, Sir!, Until Hell Freezes Over, And Then We'll Fight Them On The Ice! Sir!

User avatar
91Eunozs
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:16 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: All of them!
Location: Hill Country, Texas

Re: Z-UK

Post by 91Eunozs » Thu Apr 25, 2019 11:08 pm

Thanks for the moar!

Don’t know if it was intentional but I had a good chuckle at the line about the zombie chasing them across the field getting within “...just an arm’s length...” of them.

One armed zombie...arm’s length...lulz. :rofl:
Molon Latte...come & take our coffee order
Doctorr Fabulous wrote:... It's fun to play pretend, but this is the internet, and it's time to be serious.
zengunfighter wrote:... you don't want to blow a tranny in the middle of a pursuit...
woodsghost wrote:... A defensive gun without training is basically a talisman. It might ward off evil, but I wouldn't count on it.

User avatar
bodyparts
* *
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 9:25 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: land of the dead
Location: sw , mo

Re: Z-UK

Post by bodyparts » Sat Apr 27, 2019 9:41 pm

Thanks for the update! Please keep up the good work. The one armed zombie seen was awesome.

User avatar
Halfapint
* * * * *
Posts: 3947
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: all?
Location: Central Cascadia

Re: Z-UK

Post by Halfapint » Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:47 pm

Finally caught up!! Great work sir! and.... MOOOOOAR
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

Coxy
*
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead! 28 Days Later ... 28 Weeks Later
Location: UK & Ireland

Re: Z-UK

Post by Coxy » Thu May 02, 2019 10:41 am

Chapter 11

They followed a dry, beaten, path that led diagonally across the field towards a checkpoint that crossed a section of the A505. To their left, small pockets of people were strung out along the main road as far as the eye could see but beyond the checkpoint, hundreds of people walked slowly towards Hitchin. Most carried some form of luggage strapped across their backs or pulled behind them on wheels. Even at this distance the atmosphere felt tense and nervous, made worse by the stifling, humid, heat. Countless vehicles were scattered across the surrounding countryside, but other than a few 4x4s that were weaving their way through them, most were abandoned and people continued their journey towards Hitchin on foot.

Most of those that Pete could see walked in silence, heads down, reliving their own hell that brought them to this point no doubt. Pete never felt far from the hell he had experienced. He could feel it, like a heavy stone in his stomach. It was a constant reminder of the things he had done, the reality of Sam being gone and the fear he felt for the girls. Every now and then the sound of someone wailing carried on the breeze, but other than the march of footsteps and the rattle of bags, it seemed unnaturally quiet for that amount of people.

“Are all those people from Preston?” Lucy asked.

“I don’t know. Maybe.” Pete took her hand. “Just keep hold of my hand okay. I don’t want to lose you.”

Before they could reach the checkpoint, a Land Rover sped across the field towards them and the sound of its beeping horn caused some on the road to turn and look in their direction.

“Who’s that?” Robert asked. There was panic in his voice. “We should hurry.”

“Wait a minute.” Pete said as a smile slowly spread across his face.

“Are you fucking mad?”

“Robert.” Caroline practically screamed. “You mustn’t use language like that. Especially in front of Lucy.” Pete noticed Robert turn a deep shade of red at Caroline’s reproach and she looked away, nervously, under his glare.

Robert took a couple of deep breaths to calm himself before he spoke to Caroline, but he was clearly angry at the way he had been spoken to. “We don’t know who that is.” He pointed at the Land Rover which was getting closer. “But I’d rather be safely behind those soldiers.” He pointed again as if to make his point. “Than stood in the middle of a field with a stupid grin on my face.” The last bit was clearly aimed at Pete, but he didn’t care. “We are moving. Now.” He grabbed Caroline’s arm and started towards the checkpoint moments before the Land Rover skidded to a halt a few metres in front of Pete and Lucy.

A tall man with an olive complexion and round stomach got out. He was dressed in army fatigues, but they were so clean and spotless they practically shone. “Pete.” The man laughed, pushing his thick curly hair out of his eyes. “What the hell are you doing out here.” Before Pete could answer, the man wrapped his big arms around him in an embrace.

Pete hugged him back and felt the relief wash out of him. “Mate, you have no idea how good it is to see you.”

The man stood back from Pete. “You look like shit. He noticed Lucy stood beside him. “And who is this lovely lady?” He said, standing to mock attention and holding his hand out to Lucy.

“I’m Lucy Kavanagh.” Lucy said, shaking his hand.

“Pleased to meet you Lucy Kavanagh, I’m Gareth Varsany.” He gave her an exaggerated bow which made her laugh. “And you two are?” Pete turned and saw Robert and Caroline. He sighed inwardly that they hadn’t disappeared into the throngs of people walking the road to Hitchin.

“Robert Simmons.” Robert said in a friendly, charming manner, shaking Gareth’s hand. “And my wife Caroline.” Pete noticed Robert’s change in personality once again as he introduced Caroline who smiled graciously and shook Gareth’s hand.

“Pleased to meet you.” Gareth pushed the hair from his face again.

“Are you in charge around here?” Robert asked, motioning to the crowd of people that stretched along the A505.

Gareth chuckled, as if embarrassed at Robert’s words. “Good Lord no. I’m a doctor out of Lister Hospital in Stevenage. We’ve been stationed at Hitchin ever since the army rolled in on Saturday morning, but, well, to cut a long story short the place has gone tits up and me and the missus are getting the hell out of here.” Gareth looked at Pete with a frown. “Speaking of which. Where’s Sam?” Pete just shook his head slightly and looked away from his friend. Tears welled up in his eyes, but he fought them back with a deep breath. Gareth stood there for a second, his mouth open slightly, before he hugged him again. “Pete. I’m so sorry. What happened?”

“I … I can’t. Not now. Not here.”

“What … what about the girls?” Gareth stood back from Pete but kept his hands on his shoulders as if afraid to let go.

“I’m not sure. Last I heard they were at home and Thomas was on his way.” Pete could feel Gareth breathe a sigh of relief.

“Then let’s get you home.”

---

Gareth had plenty of food and water which they all devoured, ravenous from a day walking across the countryside in the hot sun. The more Pete ate, the more he realised how hungry he was and how exhausted he felt, but eventually, his body couldn’t take anymore and he stared out of the window. Army vehicles and personnel lined either side of the road. Every few hundred metres, a barricade crossed the road and people were spot checked for what Pete assumed were signs of the infection, before being allowed through. He saw one man being dragged away from his family by two soldiers as people around him suddenly gave him a wide berth, but they drove past before he could see what happened next. Every now and then a tall watchtower sprouted out from the ground and snipers scanned the crowd from up high.

Gareth’s voice pulled his attention away from what he was watching. “That field you crossed for example.” Gareth said, obviously half way through a story. “A few hours ago, they just came up on people from nowhere. Within seconds you couldn’t tell who was infected and who wasn’t. In the end, the army didn’t discriminate between infected or not, old or young, they just shot everything that moved. It was over almost as soon as it begun.
“But small groups like that, maybe 50 or 60, aren’t the problem. There’s a herd about six or seven miles away of thousands. I’ve been attached to a unit monitoring them, but this morning the guys decided they’d had enough and went AWOL. Just up’ed and left. Not that I blame them. Society is literally collapsing.”

“But we’re safe now, right?” Robert asked from the back seat.

“Honestly?” Gareth shook his head slightly. “No. No we’re not.”

“So, what are you going to do?” Pete interrupted. He didn’t need to know how bad things were. He’d seen enough to know things were pretty messed up. He just needed some help getting to the girls.

“Well, Gemma is in Hitchin with what’s left of the Stevenage team. As for what we are going to do, is get Gemma, do whatever you need to do, including getting the girls, and we are heading east.”

“Wait. What?” Pete held up his hand. He knew Gareth tended to run away with things once his mind was made up.

“People are coming to Hitchin because they think it’s safe but it’s not. The scale of this thing is going to be biblical. It’s like a tsunami rolling through the country, across the whole world in fact, and it’s just going to get bigger and bigger. London, Birmingham and Luton fell to this thing like that.” He clicked his fingers for emphasis. “That herd is going to crash through Hitchin like it’s done to dozens of other small towns and villages and it’s going to keep going.

“People are either desperate to get to safety, like the hundreds trying to get into Hitchin and every other town surrounding the infected areas, or they are staying put and hoping the army is going to protect them. Some places will be lucky to survive the riots, if you can believe that. There are some nasty people out there. But soon there won’t be any help. At the moment, the army is set up as best it can and it’s protecting hospitals like Lister and towns like Hitchin but that’s all about to end. They’re pulling out but no one knows where. That’s why those lads I was with went AWOL. They’re local lads. They’ve got family around here. They weren’t going to just leave them behind, and who can blame them.

“I don’t know what you’ve seen out there but I’ve seen enough and I’ve heard enough stories. Right now, people in general are frozen. The majority don’t know what to do. So, we should move, before the roads block up and before this virus or infection or whatever it is spreads to every inch of the country. We might already be too late, but I think we can just about make it. Even Thomas said the coast was the right choice.”

“You’ve seen Thomas?”

“No. Last summer when we were in Suffolk. He said …”

“Bloody hell.” Pete interrupted with an incredulous laugh. “We were drunk. You know what he’s like. This isn’t the movies.”

Gareth slowed the car as he was waved through a checkpoint and into Hitchin. They stopped briefly while more people in hazard suits checked them over. “It’s just a precaution.” Gareth assured them.

When they got back into the Land Rover Gareth turned to Pete, staring at him intently. “A few hours Pete. A few hours and all this will be gone. Gemma will tell you the same thing. We either stay here and I say I told you so as we all die, or we at least try and get out of here. What’s it to be?”

Pete rubbed each side of his head with the end of his fingers. He felt annoyed at his friend. It had taken them almost two days to walk a few miles from Luton to Hitchin and barely survived that, let alone get all the way across to the coast. Gareth made it sound like it would be a nice drive through the country. “We need to get to Lucy’s granddad, we need to get home to the girls and I need to speak to Gemma. And then we can decide.” In truth, he was desperate to get home, but he promised Maeve he would get Lucy to her granddad first.

“Okay, okay.” Gareth said, holding up his hands in surrender. “Lucy, where are we heading?”

Lucy directed Gareth through Hitchin but other than people dressed in military uniforms, and armoured vehicles that passed them by, Hitchin was practically deserted. “Where is everyone?” Caroline asked.

“Hitchin is on lockdown.” Gareth explained. “Everyone is pretty much under 24-hour curfew. There are eight quarantine and inspection areas set up where people are sent to when they arrive then in theory they are assigned somewhere to stay, but between us there are simply too many people to process. Even if they had the time, those people trying to get in haven’t got a chance.

“Right, here we are.” Gareth said stopping outside the house Lucy was pointing to excitedly. She had opened the door before Gareth had even stopped. “Why don’t you two come with me,” Gareth said to Robert and Caroline before they had a chance to follow Lucy. “I could do with a hand getting our gear together.” He smiled politely, which was returned by Robert as Caroline agreed that of course they should help. She called after Lucy, saying they’d be back soon, but Lucy just ran up the garden path without turning around.

Gareth grabbed Pete’s arm as he made to get out. “Half an hour and I’ll be back with Gemma then we will go and get the girls. And then we will have a proper chat.”

Gareth smiled at that but Pete didn’t know where he would start. Maybe with all the people he had killed? For the first time, he felt distant from his friend, as if a gulf suddenly existed between them. Pete had changed and a part of him had been left behind, but Gareth was still Gareth. Still smiling, still looking for that next adventure. He wasn’t sure he’d ever be able to admit to him the things he had done, so he just returned the smile with a non-committal nod and closed the door.

Lucy used a key that was hanging from her neck to open the front door, and called out for her granddad as she ran inside. Pete closed the door behind him and followed Lucy straight into the dining room, beyond which was the lounge and then the kitchen, where Pete watched Lucy embrace her granddad who was beaming from ear to ear at her sudden appearance. He looked older than Maeve and as he stooped to hug Lucy, one hand, which rested on his walking stick, shook slightly as he did so. Pete smiled at the reunion, but knew then that he wouldn’t make it five minutes outside these walls and to leave Lucy here would be as good as a death sentence.

“And who’s this?” Lucy’s granddad asked when he saw Pete standing watching them.

Lucy turned in Pete’s direction, smiling. “This is Pete granddad. He helped me get here.”

“Then I owe you a great debt.” He nodded in Pete’s direction. “My name’s William, but most people call me Bill.”

“He saved us and looked after me when …” She suddenly went quiet and held onto her granddad while she cried.

“Where’s Nana Lucy?” He asked but she didn’t answer. Instead he looked at Pete. “Where’s my wife?”

Pete had had this conversation with strangers more times than he could remember, but on this occasion, he was lost for words, so he just told William the truth. “She died. She died so Lucy and I could live. I’m sorry. She … she was a very brave woman.”

Bill nodded silently. There was sadness in his eyes but also relief, Pete thought, that at least now he knew and at least his granddaughter was alive and well. “Help me to my chair Lucy. Then Pete here can tell me what happened exactly.”

And so, Pete told Bill their story while Lucy sat in his lap and rested her head against his chest. He told him about escaping from the airport, about Sam and her virus, and what happened to her. He told him about the girls. He told him about what Maeve had done so they could live. Pete told him about the men they encountered and how they escaped. There were things he left out, a lot of things, but he wasn’t sure he could admit to what he had done. All the while silent tears flowed down the old man’s cheeks as he cuddled Lucy and listened, staring into space. Finally, he told them about Gareth and what he had told them.

“So, you’ll get your daughters and head east?” Bill asked, running his hands through Lucy’s hair before kissing her on the top of her head.

“I … I don’t know.”

“It’s a good plan.” Bill said nodding. “But first,” he reached behind Lucy and picked up the phone, “we should phone your mam.”

“Lucy’s safe,” was all Bill managed to say before Lucy tore the phone from his hands and called for her mammy. Pete could hear voices on the other end, but Lucy spoke in Irish so he couldn’t understand what they were saying. He could understand the sorrow and fear in her voice though and he heard Lucy mention himself and Sam. Pete hung his head at the mention of Sam’s name and closed his eyes to fight back the memories of those last few hours with her.

“Pete.” Pete looked up at Lucy. “Mammy wants to speak with you.”

For some reason, he was nervous at that. No. With good reason. What the hell was he going to say to her. He took the phone and brought it to his ear. He started with ‘Hi’. There was a pause, and he wondered if the phone had gone dead.

“Thank you. Jesus Mary, thank you.”

Pete didn’t know what to say.

“Lucy says you’re going to bring her home.”

“Yes.” Pete replied. He looked at Lucy and Bill who were both watching him intently. “I’m going to bring Lucy home.” What else could he say. He desperately wanted it to be true. He’d have to start with that. Lucy beamed at his words, but Bill suddenly looked despondent.

“Thank you Pete. And God bless you. We’ll be waiting right here.”

Pete handed the phone back to Lucy who chatted even more excitedly down the phone. He shared a look with Bill that silently spoke of the enormity of the challenge.

Lucy wiped her tears as best she could and handed the phone back to Bill. “I’ll call you back shortly,” he finally managed to say before he hung up.

“We are going with Pete aren’t we granddad?” Lucy said, a confused look on her face.

Bill paused and looked at Pete briefly, before his eyes settled on Lucy. He helped her wipe her tears away with his fingers. “Oh Lucy. I can’t.”

Lucy stood up, pushing herself away from her granddad and folded her arms across her chest. “Why can’t we? Gareth said if we stay here we will all die, didn’t he Pete.”

“Please Lucy.” Bill held his hands out to her. “I’m old Lucy. Whatever happens, I can’t go out there. I’d put you all in danger.”

“Then I’ll stay here and look after you so.” She allowed Bill to wrap his hands over hers.

There was silence in the room. “Lucy …” Pete said, but before he could say anything Lucy turned towards him.

“No.” She shouted. “We left Nana and we left Sam and now we have to leave granddad? This isn’t fair.”

“You’re right Lucy. It’s not.” Pete said.

But whether Lucy heard him or not, Pete didn’t know, because now she was crying uncontrollably in Bill’s arms.

“You have to be brave Lucy.” Bill said as he apologised over and over again, until finally, she calmed down.

“I’m scared.”

“I know.” Bill replied in a whisper.

“I want mammy.”

Pete watched them hold each other for a few seconds until he realised he was holding his breath.

“Lucy.” Bill said. “There’s a box in my bedside table I’d like you to get please.”

“Why?” She said defiantly.

“Please Lucy. It’s important.”

Bill watched Lucy walk up the stairs until she’d disappeared, out of view, before he turned to face Pete. “I’ve seen the news. I can’t leave here, that’s clear enough. A few years ago, maybe but,” he taped his cane, “it all catches up with you eventually. And if your friend is to be believed, Lucy can’t stay here.”

“My youngest, Katy, She’s not much older than Lucy. I know how your feeling, believe me. I can’t explain what’s going on Bill. I don’t have any answers. But Gemma and Gareth. They are good people.”

“You’re doing pretty well yourself Pete. You mustn’t forget that, especially now.”

“Maybe.” Pete wasn’t so sure anymore. “But my point is, we will look after Lucy and we will do everything we can to get her home.”

“That’s all I ask.”

Lucy reappeared with a shoe box and handed it to Bill. In it he took out another box, about the size of a paperback novel, which opened to reveal a wealth of jewellery. He took out a gold bracelet and put it on Lucy’s wrist. “Your Nana would have wanted you to have this.” Bill said. “It was her favourite. The rest,” he said handing the box to Pete, “is for you.”

“I can’t …”

“You can. You must. It’s no good to me. The coast will be a dangerous place and money won’t be worth the paper it’s printed on. This might help at least.”

“Thank you.” Pete said, but before he could say anything else there was a knock at the door.

Pete opened it to find Gemma stood there. As always, her mousey brown hair was pulled back in a tight ponytail but despite her youthful glow, betraying the years she had on Pete, Gareth and Sam, she looked tired. But when she smiled her big smile, the tiredness seemed to wash away and even caused Pete to feel slightly invigorated. She seemed to have that effect on people.

Before he could say anything, she stood on tiptoes so she could reach up, and wrapped her arms around his neck in a hug. She whispered in his ear that she was sorry about Sam. “But let’s get the girls first and then we can talk.” She smiled again and walked past him into the house. “And you must be Lucy. I hear you’ve already met that big lump of a boyfriend of mine.” She winked at Lucy making her eyes light up slightly, despite the situation.

Pete watched as Gemma spoke with Lucy’s granddad. Even Bill seemed to have found some new energy while they spoke. He was glad she was there. She had a knack of making people comfortable and feel at ease. He heard Gemma mention Ireland, and a big adventure, before Gareth called his name from the door and pointed at his watch. Pete noticed he’d got rid of the army fatigues and now wore his traditional shorts and colourful Fijian style shirt.

“Lucy,” Pete said. “I’m sorry. But we have to go.”

As Bill stood, Lucy hugged him so hard, Pete thought he might snap in two. She cried uncontrollably against her granddad and Pete looked away at the scene, unable to comprehend what she was going through. He thought of Sarah and Katy and imagined them in Lucy’s place. He tried not to, but he cried silently. He couldn’t help it. Pete heard Lucy tell Bill she loved him and watched as Bill knelt down, without his cane, and cupped her cheeks with his hands.

“You’re the bravest young woman I’ve ever known.” He said, looking directly into her eyes. “You get that from your Nana and your mam. You need to be brave now. You listen to Pete and Gemma. You stay with them and you get home to your mam, dad and brothers. I love you Lucy. You’ve been the light of my life and I truly believe me and Nana will see you again. Not for a long time I hope. But one day.” He kissed Lucy on the cheek and pried her away into Gemma’s arms.

Bill thanked Gemma and hugged her too. Pete saw her put something in his hand, discreetly, before she kissed him on the cheek.

Gemma held Lucy close, who struggled to take in breath as she cried, and led her out of the house. Bill and Pete shook hands before they left. There were no words spoken between them, just a silent understanding of what they both would face.

Pete took Gemma to one side as Lucy climbed into the front of the Land Rover. “What did you give Bill?”

Gemma checked Lucy wasn’t listening before she spoke. “Just something to help him on his way, if that’s what he wants. If you know what I mean.”
Pete could guess. “How did you know?”

“I didn’t.” Gemma shrugged. “But I thought there might be a chance, you know, that he wasn’t going to come with us.”

Pete took one final look at Bill’s house, as Gemma climbed into the Land Rover, before they drove away.

User avatar
Halfapint
* * * * *
Posts: 3947
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 5:41 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: all?
Location: Central Cascadia

Re: Z-UK

Post by Halfapint » Thu May 02, 2019 2:01 pm

Great update!
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

Post Reply

Return to “Fiction”