Wild Edibles Identification Guide

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Wild Edibles Identification Guide

Post by aa1pr » Sat Apr 24, 2010 10:52 am

I drove past this area just at the beginning of the week and the area along Otter Creek was encompassed with fiddleheads. It was wet and rainy then and for the last few days the sun has been bright and the days perfect. So all the ones I seen had opened up by now. That is OK as most of these were mature and I do not personally like them (a bit dry & sour). So I knew there must be some young ones here as well. So our search begins.

The basic areas to begin your search looked like this, as if there are some you are sure to find more. This plant is so common we all know what it looks like hopefully.
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I like the small immature young fiddle heads and this is what we look for. To consume these I feel is an acquired taste. Either you like them or hate them I have found. Our findings may be a bit late but better now than never.
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Here they are all sliced to perfection and washed off in the colander, I like to wash them off and shake them around a bit as sometimes you can find bugs in them (extra flavor :mrgreen: ). I cut the stalks off as close to the fiddlehead as possible. I like to sauté mine in butter over a medium heat until done. It is also recommended that you: “When cooking fiddleheads, first remove all the yellow/brown skin, then boil the sprouts twice with a change of water between boiling’s. Removing the water reduces the bitterness and the content of tannins and toxins.” According to the USDA
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Carefully brush off and remove the papery brown scales. One must wash fiddleheads in clean, potable water several times until the wash water appears clean. Then bring a small amount of lightly salted water to a boil, add washed fiddleheads, and cook them at a steady boil for 10 minutes. Fiddleheads can also be washed clean and steamed for 20 minutes. Others like to serve them at once with melted butter or vinegar. The sooner they are eaten, the more delicate their flavor. They may be served, like asparagus, on toast. Cooked, chilled fiddleheads can be also served as a salad with an onion and vinegar dressing. I think we may add some to our stir fry later this evening as a first for me.


I am not a biologist but I avoid these hairy ones at all cost. *So please avoid them!* Not sure what causes it or if they are a sub species or what not?
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If anyone else can add or contribute to this topic let's keep it moving. I am no expert but just a part of what I have gathered and done in my humble life time...
Last edited by aa1pr on Sat Dec 18, 2010 8:02 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: FiddleHead Harvesting 56K

Post by Zombies And SlimJims » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:02 am

I can't contribute other than I've seen these all over before and never attempted to eat them. I'm definitely picking a bunch next time I spot some. Maybe it's because I'm hungry right now, but I'm salivating at the thought of sauteed fiddleheads. Thanks for the post!
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Wild leek Harvesting 56K

Post by aa1pr » Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:47 pm

In our search for fiddle heads today my son came across these wild onions or more appropriately known as wild leeks or even ramps. The odor in the air is strong as you know of their presence.
** If there is one thing I must convey here is that if you are unsure of what you are touching or going to consume DO NOT** get the correct books or do the research before you venture out. As in most cases a very small nibble or portion could/can kill you. **

On a side note when you find any wild edible plants do not harvest the complete area only take a few of what you will use… that way there is more for later years and the survival of the plant. In this case the whole hillside is plastered with them. When my son was gathering these another local came out to get some also. So I guess a few know of their location.
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You can tell by the broad, smooth, light green leaves, often with deep purple or burgundy tints on the lower stems begin arriving in small bunches as soon as the snow disappears. The bulbs strongly rooted just beneath the surface of the soil. You should also be able to smell an onion like presence or odor. I seem to always find them in moist woodlands. In the summer and fall they change and have either flower or seeds. To me they appear to look like a mix between and onion and garlic.
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Here are a few of the leeks thinned out so as to provide a better picture of what they really look like. Most books will tell you that they are very strong tasting, but smelling yes. I think otherwise. The whole pant is edible and quite tasty in foods. Again I think some of the leaves will have to go into our stir fry meal later this evening.
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Here is a closer look of the bulbs
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The leaves resemble basal in appearance and are excellent added to salads and other foods for some flavor.
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I must admit all of the work and pictures were taken by my son.. now I just have to get him to join.
Does anyone have any ideas or comments to add please do so and let's keep the idea moving.

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Re: Wild leek Harvesting 56K

Post by kir » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:12 pm

Neat! I've not seen those before. Let us know how the leaves in the stir-fry turn out.
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Re: Wild leek Harvesting 56K

Post by Jeriah » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:37 pm

aa1pr wrote:In our search for fiddle heads today my son came across these wild onions or more appropriately known as wild leeks or even ramps. The odor in the air is strong as you know of their presence.
** If there is one thing I must convey here is that if you are unsure of what you are touching or going to consume DO NOT** get the correct books or do the research before you venture out. As in most cases a very small nibble or portion could/can kill you. **
Happily, I believe that any wild plant that smells of onions is edible. Note that LOOKING like an onion is no guarantee at all, but the smell is reliably diagnostic of a safe-to-eat plant. (The smell being the defense mechanism, it requires no additional toxicity to deter being eaten.) Don't be stupid about this, of course, as some malicious prankster may take to spritzing death camas or poison hemlock with some onion juice just to fuck with me, but as a general rule, onion smell = safe to eat.

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Re: Wild leek Harvesting 56K

Post by bluesquid » Sat Apr 24, 2010 2:48 pm

love them.

cool post
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Wild Edibles Identification Guide 1

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:53 pm

This thread is dedicated to the proper identification of wild edibles. All entries must include original photos and should contain pertinent information relating to the proper identification and safe consumption of the edible. To avoid possible misidentification commentary is welcome and the moderators retain the right to delete any post. Consuming wild edibles without first seeking expert advice in the field is not recommended as mistakes can be fatal. You are responsible for your own safety.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Zombies And SlimJims » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:53 pm

Mods, delete this if it doesn't fit the qualifications, but I was just wondering if there is any easy way to yank out a scallion? All over in the woods around here, and I love chewing on them while I hike (I know, I should wash them first, but I peel back the outside layer and give it a quick shake through running water - just boosting the ol' immune system :lol: ) I just hate getting them out of the ground, seems every time I try to pull one up, it will snap off even if I'm grabbing from the base of it, I end up sticking my knife into the ground and prying them out..
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:56 pm

Wild Scallions.

Wild Scallions are a great early season edible. They go by a few names but scallions seems the most common in my neck of the woods.To me they seem rather mild in flavor but make 100% certain what you pick has an onion flavor. I don’t know if there are any false scallion looking plants around but better safe than sorry. In my AO scallions seem to prefer a more open area with good light and fertile ground. I hardly ever find them growing in rock hard soil. They can be found growing in bunches with multiple plants in the area. Normally if you find one bunch there is sure to be more.

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A bunch of scallions consists of multiple stalks growing packed together.

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The stalks are edible and easy to chop. They can be eaten either raw or cooked but my personal preference is raw.

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The bulb is also edible and can be used just like a small onion. I like to cook them with fish and game. They can be removed by grasping the scallion’s stalk near the ground and pulling the plant with a strong steady motion. You can pull the entire bunch or just one bulb.

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I cut off the thin roots and clean the dirt from the bulb. I don’t know if the roots are edible but there are often enough around not to worry about that. On a side note it’s never a good idea to totally remove a forage item from the local environment. It’s best to leave some behind however in a survival situation conservation may not apply.

A short wild scallion video.

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by aa1pr » Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:25 pm

Awesome I would love to find those over our leeks/ramps anyday !!

Glad to see this thread develop !!

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by DarkAxel » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:09 pm

Ok, let's talk Plantain (Plantago Major)

1. You most likely have Plantain growing in your yard. It grows in a wide range of areas, including disturbed/cultivated soil, plains, foothills, and mountainous regions. It's a common leafy green that is a regional favorite here in KY.

2. The seeds can be dried and ground into flour or meal. This is a very good source of dietary fiber (A common ingredient in fiber supplements)

3. The young leaves can be eaten raw.

A few examples:

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The leaves are best when chopped very fine or cooked after the fibrous parts have been removed.

Always wash the leaves before eating or cooking.

When cooking older leaves, boil the leaves, then drain, repeat twice more. Best prepared with bacon grease (mmmm, bacon). Bacon grease is also awesome on the raw, young leaves.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:48 am

Wild Black and Red Raspberries (Wineberries):

Here is another great wild edible. In my AO these are summer edibles that will go past season as Fall approaches. Often I find them on the margins (edges) of a clearing, road or trail. The black variety is ripe when as the name would indicate take on a dark near blackbarry color. If redish they aren't ripe.

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Red raspberries in this case wineberries turn a bright red color when ripe, go figure. :lol:

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They are not ripe when the colors trend towards yellow/orange as can be seen below.

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Wild Raspberry bushes tend to have thorns so when working deep into a large bush keep that in mind. The red ones seem to attract a little bug that resembles a very small green walking stick. Easy to eat by mistake and they aren’t all that good so keep an eye out for them. If the bush has been picked over look under the outer leaves as sometimes good berries can be found which escaped notice. I make jam out of the reds but will consume both anytime they turn up. When fully ripe the reds rock but both are great.

Raspberries are made up of little multiple compartments each of which has its own seed so there is a bunch of them in a berry. This isn't an issue beyond the occasional seed stuck between my teeth. As shown in the photos once the berry is picked it will leave behind a core. These factors along with the common use of raspberries makes for an easy to identify wild edible. On a side note just because some berries may have similar colors to these doesn’t mean they are safe. So if you don’t know leave it alone.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 26, 2010 12:50 pm

Wild Blackberries:

Wild blackberries are an easy to identify Summer edible. Blackberries are made of the multiple sections each with a seed. So a berry will have a large number of harmless seeds. Unlike raspberries they will not leave a core behind after picked. Blackberries can be found at the margins (edges) of fields, roads and trails but will take advantage of most any open area. The size of the berry and flavor will vary somewhat between different types however in my AO they all share the same general characteristics.

Some varieties of blackberries grow on the ground.

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Others grow as a standing bush.

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Blackberries turn from greenish red to a deep black color as they ripen.

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The green (not ripe) berries are sour but once ripe they are just awesome. Often good berries can be found hidden from view lower on a bush or behind the leaves. I eat them right off the bush or make blackberry jam which rocks.

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Many blackberry bushes have nasty thorns so watch you’re self. Also don’t become so focused on picking that you forget to look out for bees etc. I always keep an eye on my hands and feet. Like raspberries color alone isn’t a full proof indicator of species so if you have any questions just leave it alone.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by DarkAxel » Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:19 pm

In my AO, the biggest danger while picking blackberries is Copperheads. They love Blackberry thickets for some reason (I think it has to do with all of the wild grazers and birds that like blackberries as much as I do).

Blackberries also make great wine! :wink:
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by aa1pr » Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:00 pm

You can steep (boil) the raspberry leaves as a tea and the dried bark from the blackberry bush relieves diarehea when boiled and drank if memory serves me right.

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Wild Edibles : Dandelions Identification Guide.

Post by aa1pr » Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:16 pm

How many times have you ever stepped upon or over these little deserving plants that taste so delicious and are ever so nutritional…with multiple uses.
Here is my digging stick for getting dandelions. I like the stick to be about 1” in diameter and maybe a foot long if not a bit more. We all know what dandelions look like so I did not take a picture of the flower. They are those annoying plants that seem to infest our yards and the likes. We all know them by the yellow flower and the arrow shaped leaves. Thankfully there are no poisonous look-a-likes for this species of plant. The meaning of the plant in French is “Lions Tooth”. This plant also has many medicinal uses, even though I will avoid discussion of them for our topic.
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Chicory and wild lettuce also resemble dandelions in the spring and are also edible. The milky sap can be used as a improvised glue of sorts? It has been proven effective in removing warts, soothing sores and bee stings and blisters for some. The flowers are used in home made wines as well. Picking these before the flower’s blossom results in the best tasting plants.

** If there is one thing I must convey here is that if you are unsure of what you are touching or going to consume DO NOT ** get the correct books or do the research before you venture out. As in most cases a very small nibble or portion could/can kill you. **


Younger ones (plants) may not have the arrow shaped definition just yet. These I feel are somewhat tastier in my opinion. These leaves are excellent added to salads. Just try to get them before the yellow flower develops or otherwise they can be bitter tasting. Or you can boil them a couple of times in the summer and fall to improve their taste as well. The leaves have a higher nutritional value than any commercially produced vegetable one can buy. Just make sure you harvest them away from roadsides or known places where one uses pesticides.
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Here my daughter is demonstrating how the digging stick is effective in the plants removal.
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Here she is with the plant removed; this is a mature plant even though I feel the leaves on these mature ones are bitter. You can boil them to improve their taste if so desired, kind of reminds me of spinach. I intend to use just the roots this time for a coffee substitute. Not sure if you can see how more arrow shape defined a mature plant leaves are.
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Here you can compare the new & old side by side before my consumption. The young leaves may go into a salad for lunch. The mature ones I will only use the roots as well as all the roots from the others for either boiling or a coffee alternative. The roots if found are edible all year long.
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The roots are OK tasting boiled. To make the coffee substitute you first roast the roots and then grind them. You can than steep them over water and there you have your coffee substitute. I have never tried this yet, as this is the purpose here. I even read somewhere once that the root of goats beard can also be roasted and ground to make a coffee substitute. Goat’s Beard resembles a dandelion head when the white seeds are blossoming except it has holes in the pattern like a waffle ball effect. In my area they are not very common.

Here I tried to clean the roots as best as one could. I gently scraped the side of a knife broad side the roots to hopefully remove any excess soil.
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Here are the cleaned roots in preparation to being roasted or in this case I am going to bake them until brittle in the oven. Or you can boil them at this point and consume them in this manner also.
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Here the roots are before grinding and brewing for my coffee. This pile of roots after grinding maybe yielded a teaspoons worth. I left out the grinding pictures as I really broke it up into the finest pieces I could.
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I wonder if you could use it to dye wood…LOL

So here is my homebrew coffee… so the next time you have these removed, at least enjoy the fruit of your labor. It actually tastes a bit like someone added a hint of tea to my coffee. Different but unique to say the least, so give it a try!

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:12 pm

Hickory nuts:

Hickory nuts are one of my favorite Fall wild edibles. They are an easy to identify edible despite variations in both trees and nuts. Hickory nuts can be stored longer than many other forage items. In a good year Hickory trees can drop a great deal of nuts. Like many nuts they are high in both calories and fat which is a real benefit. Some Hickory trees produce a very nice tasting nut.

http://www.prevention.com/cda/vendorart ... /nutrition" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here are some examples of Hickory bark.

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This one seems to be an over achiever in the shaggy department. :lol:

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Sorry to say the leaves are not fully developed yet so will have to update this thread with a photo and description in a few weeks.

Edit.

The leaves are out. I guess a photo is worth a 1,000 words.

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Some Hickory nuts in pouch.

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In a good year it doesn’t take all that long to pick a bunch of them. But like any wild edible l leave some behind and move on to another area.

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They are ripe when the husk turns from green to black and splits open. Sometimes the nut will remain inside the husk longer when ripe and other times they separate faster. Husks are a good indication of Hickory and like these can be found even after winter.

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A green (slang for not ripe) nut will be whiter in appearance with a green husk. The husk will be bonded to the nut. They are extremely bitter so my advice is to avoid consumption until ripe.

A green hickory nut.

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On the flip side when ripe I think they’re downright good eating. The shell is very hard and most standard nut crackers will be full of fail. The best way to crack a Hickory nut is to place the nut on a rock and use another rock to smash it open. Apply the right amount of force to break the shell but not so much as to obliterate the nut.

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Hickory nut issues.

You are in direct competition with squirrels and other woodland critters. A person can’t be assured that the same quantity of forage will be available even in the short term. If a tree is worked over or has a poor output I move on to the next tree or area. Hickory nut harvests can be unreliable. Basically some years are good and others not so much. Sometimes I will find a little grub inside the nut but on the flip side I get to crush the buggers with a rock. Within in my AO I know of Shagbark, Mockernut and Pignut Hickory. Some nuts are sweeter than others and it’s very possible that certain Hickory species produce bitter nuts. Shagbark Hickory is easy to identify given its bark and well known for producing a sweet nut. Shagbark nuts might be a good candidate for those unsure. I had good luck with other types as well.
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Rick12337 » Tue Apr 27, 2010 6:51 am

here in Plattsburgh a lot of people I know love to pickle leaks. No luck in finding any so far though.

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by aa1pr » Wed Apr 28, 2010 5:37 pm

Rick12337 wrote:here in Plattsburgh a lot of people I know love to pickle leaks. No luck in finding any so far though.
We have a whole hillside if you ever make it over here....

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by riverjoe47 » Sat May 01, 2010 8:20 pm

Paw Paw hard to find but worth the effort . It took me ten years to discover my Paw Paw grove but if Id have known this trick I could have found them much earlier . Right now they are in bloom with very small leaves so they really stand out . You must return in the fall and pick the banana like fruit while still green or the critters will beat you to it .
Just let it ripen on the porch until they get to looking like a ripe Avacado .
Flavor to me is like citrus custard . Really great if half frozen .
Like to grow near rivers and creeks among all the other brushey trees .
Like rabbits where theres one theres two .(actually more like 10 or 15 ) they share a common root system .
I beleive they are much more common then people realize . Here are the flowers which cant be mistaken for anything else .
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Violets Identification Guide.

Post by aa1pr » Sat May 15, 2010 6:46 pm

Wild Violets

** If there is one thing I must convey here is that if you are unsure of what you are touching or going to consume DO NOT** get the correct books or do the research before you venture out. As in most cases a very small nibble or portion could/can kill you. **




This is another one of those wild plants that is considered a weed by many. It is easily identifiable by the violet color where the name is derived from. The stalk contains no leaves and the leaves themselves are heart shaped. I gather the leaves or the flowers specifically. The flower consists of five (5) petals. The leaves have shallow teeth around the edge when identifying them and remember the heart shape. What is odd is that the flower and leaves emit from the ground separately, but in close proximity. Spring time makes them the easiest to identify and locate in my opinion.

One must be careful as the dwarf larkspur is similar to this plant while it has a different leaf and a spur behind the flower. **So see warning** the rhizome or stalks are toxic as well.

The arrow points to the violet in my area and its leaf. In some regions they are yellow or even blue in color. The yellow species may cause stomach issues so be careful if consumed in large quantities. I always seem to find these in somewhat moist or shadowed areas in my locale.
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Composite shot of flower and leaves of violet plant for a visual ID. We had a thunder storm approaching so these began to curl before I could get the shot off.
Image

You can add the flowers to honey as flavor or make a tea from them as well if you enjoy tea. Or dry store them and add to your favorite foods over the year for an extra bit of flavor. The leaves can be added to your bush salad. I never seem to find enough of these in one location so I use them as a snack.

So hopefully here is another plant we can add to our collection of wild edibles.

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gillis
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by gillis » Tue May 18, 2010 3:20 am

These are some of the plants I had trouble identifying on my trip to the canyons this weekend. I posted links so you could see them in vivid detail. Do any of you guys know the names and edibility of these? Thanks in advance. I put letters above each for referance. For the sake of Argument use the central plants for referance if there are multiple plants in the scene. It should be pretty obvious the subject matter. If it isn't let me know.


A)
http://img191.imageshack.us/i/dsc00339qh.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I think this one is peppergrass?

B)
http://img10.imageshack.us/i/dsc00148rv.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Don't know at all?

C)
http://img294.imageshack.us/i/dsc00227ph.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/1706/dsc00226r.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Perhaps 3 leaf Sumac?

D)
http://img197.imageshack.us/i/dsc00198qz.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I think this might be locoweed? Poisonus

E)
http://img571.imageshack.us/i/dsc00421i.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No idea

F)
http://img706.imageshack.us/i/dsc00256n.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea

G)
http://img189.imageshack.us/i/dsc00254lx.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea - Maybe Carrion Flower?

H)
http://img405.imageshack.us/i/dsc00253yn.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea

I)
http://img691.imageshack.us/i/dsc00424i.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea

J)
http://img576.imageshack.us/img576/4121/dsc00134k.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Solomans seal?? You can see horsetail at the bottom but I'm not interested in that.

K)
http://img691.imageshack.us/i/dsc00412m.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img32.imageshack.us/i/dsc00411nj.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img194.imageshack.us/i/dsc00410z.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Somthing similar to Amaranth?
Last edited by gillis on Thu May 27, 2010 8:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Blast
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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Blast » Tue May 18, 2010 8:42 am

Danny,

I can't access your pictures at work but I'll see if I can identify them when I get home tonight.

-Blast

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Re: Wild Edibles Identification Guide.

Post by Blast » Tue May 18, 2010 9:03 pm

[quote="DannySkillZ"]These are some of the plants I had trouble identifying on my trip to the canyons this weekend. I posted links so you could see them in vivid detail. Do any of you guys know the names and edibility of these? Thanks in advance. I put letters above each for referance. For the sake of Argument use the central plants for referance if there are multiple plants in the scene. It should be pretty obvious the subject matter. If it isn't let me know.


A)
http://img191.imageshack.us/i/dsc00339qh.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I think this one is peppergrass?
Yes, peppergrass/field pennycress

B)
http://img10.imageshack.us/i/dsc00148rv.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Don't know at all?
Looks like some form of mustard/Brassicaceae. Maybe "plains wallflower"

C)
http://img294.imageshack.us/i/dsc00227ph.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/1706/dsc00226r.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Perhaps 3 leaf Sumac?
I don't think it's 3-leaf sumac. Not sure what it is.

D)
http://img197.imageshack.us/i/dsc00198qz.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I think this might be locoweed? Poisonus
Might also be Ground Plum (Astragalus crassicarpus) which is edible. Have an expert ID it in pperson before eating it!!

E)
http://img571.imageshack.us/i/dsc00421i.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No idea
Probably Dakota Vervain (Glandularia bipinnatifida) or Rose Vervain (Glandularia canadensis).

F)
http://img706.imageshack.us/i/dsc00256n.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea
If I had to guess (which I have to) I'd say it's some sort of dogwood.

G)
http://img189.imageshack.us/i/dsc00254lx.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea - Maybe Carrion Flower?
Smilax herbacea (Carrion Flower) has palmate veins, which the leaves in picture do not. I'm not sure what it is.

H)
http://img405.imageshack.us/i/dsc00253yn.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea
Definitely some sort of primrose. The flower is a perfect match.

I)
http://img691.imageshack.us/i/dsc00424i.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
No Idea
No idea, either.

J)
http://img576.imageshack.us/img576/4121/dsc00134k.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Solomans seal?? You can see horsetail at the bottom but I'm not interested in that.
No, Soloman's seal leaves are palmate-veined and are alternately-placed on the stem. Not sure what it is.

K)
http://img691.imageshack.us/i/dsc00412m.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img32.imageshack.us/i/dsc00411nj.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://img194.imageshack.us/i/dsc00410z.jpg/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Somthing similar to Amaranth?
Curled dock. Very yummy.

-Blast

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