Pandemic Preparations - Updated for Ebola.

Topics in this category pertain to planning. Discussions include how to prepare yourself, your family and your community for catastrophes and what you plan to do when they hit you.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Tue Aug 05, 2014 2:44 pm

Free bump ... with ebola in the news...

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by wee drop o' bush » Wed Aug 06, 2014 11:13 am

Great thread, I already have N95 masks and also a Scott half mask respirator because I'm asthmatic and need to wear these when I put down fresh straw for my sheep and feed them hay. But I could always restock my supply.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Old_Man » Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:05 am

Anyone have good resources for decon of gear, masks, gloves, suits etc? I know certain items should be just thrown away (tyvek, latex gloves etc. are intended for limited/ one time use). My big worry is about other gear packs etc..

Since Ebola is in the forefront of the news...There is quite a bit of evidence suggesting infectious particulates can indeed spread the disease.

(CDC has since removed the term 'contaminated air' http://pissinontheroses.blogspot.com/20 ... ebola.html though it can still be found in some literature from the past. http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/fact-sheet.pdf
Ebola-Reston appeared in a primate research facility in Virginia, where it may have been transmitted from monkey to monkey through the air. While all Ebola virus species have displayed the ability to be spread through airborne particles (aerosols) under research conditions, this type of spread has not been documented among humans in a real-world setting, such as a hospital or household.
). 2009 article that may be incorrect in light of the present situation.

Most wandering the Zed landscape will not just be wearing their protective gear, but also have packs, firearms etc.. How do we decon these? Fabric has a tendency to hold things in nooks and crannies. Butyl rubber is easy to clean...but not the other stuff.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by IceWing » Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:42 pm

wee drop o' bush wrote:Great thread, I already have N95 masks and also a Scott half mask respirator because I'm asthmatic and need to wear these when I put down fresh straw for my sheep and feed them hay. But I could always restock my supply.
We have the 3M Full Facepiece Respirator with a variety of different filter types.

For lesser issues, we use the Kimberly Clark Duck Bill style N95 masks (Small, Regular)

My wife loves them for working outside... She gets back reactions to dirt\dust\spray...

Now, here's the bad part... I just ordered additional boxes to replenish, cause you know, we use them, and plus, new and improved ebola!

Both kinds of masks were Amazon Prime, as were the boxes of latex gloves we bought... Took almost a WEEK to get everything... The supply chain is having some disruptions folks... Do NOT wait on stuff likely to become in short supply...
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by wee drop o' bush » Thu Aug 14, 2014 3:57 pm

IceWing wrote:
wee drop o' bush wrote:Great thread, I already have N95 masks and also a Scott half mask respirator because I'm asthmatic and need to wear these when I put down fresh straw for my sheep and feed them hay. But I could always restock my supply.
We have the 3M Full Facepiece Respirator with a variety of different filter types.

For lesser issues, we use the Kimberly Clark Duck Bill style N95 masks (Small, Regular)

My wife loves them for working outside... She gets back reactions to dirt\dust\spray...

Now, here's the bad part... I just ordered additional boxes to replenish, cause you know, we use them, and plus, new and improved ebola!

Both kinds of masks were Amazon Prime, as were the boxes of latex gloves we bought... Took almost a WEEK to get everything... The supply chain is having some disruptions folks... Do NOT wait on stuff likely to become in short supply...
I've never tried the full mask, I should give it a try.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Thu Aug 14, 2014 4:50 pm

IceWing wrote: Both kinds of masks were Amazon Prime, as were the boxes of latex gloves we bought... Took almost a WEEK to get everything... The supply chain is having some disruptions folks... Do NOT wait on stuff likely to become in short supply...

That is good to know. As with anything like this when you need it, odds are good a bunch of other folks need it also. The supply chain is designed with normal demand in mind.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by wildman800 » Tue Sep 16, 2014 4:46 pm

I am thinking, based on what the CDC & WHO are stating, that it is now time to make anew evaluation of the Ebola situation.

I think it is time to update preps for a pandemic.

1. Food and water supplies, N95 or N100 (better) (or gas) masks, gloves (nitrile, vinyl, or latex), rain gear (slicker suit), duct tape, extra meds, extra consumables of all kinds, Chlorox bleach.

2. Curtailment of travel via commercial transportation (especially aircraft & air terminals).

3. Perhaps it is time to avoid events where large groups of people attend (sports arenas, festivals, public govt meetings, etc.

4. Time to make plans to homeschool one's children?

I'd like to hear everyone's thoughts on when such precautions would be prudent to put into action in order to minimize potential infection of one's family unit. What triggers would one look for?
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:05 am

IMO the key thing is to review and re-fresh as required your current preps. Ebola (at this time) is not transmitted via airborne processes except perhaps via aerosol transmission. That means that avoidance and basic hygiene will be very effective in prevention.

What that means is that n-95 masks are likely to be less useful than disposable gloves and basic hygiene (like washing hands, not touching your eyes, covering an cuts/abrasions to avoid exposure).

However, it is clear that the following as a minimum should be on hand:
1) hand sanitizer
2) disposable gloves
3) bleach and similar cleaners
4) Isopropyl alcohol
5) PPE outer garments - a simple rain suit would be good or tyvek suits.
6) Eye protection
7) N-95 masks

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Post by crypto » Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:31 am

One important thing that Army Medical brings to the table is a robust and disciplined approach to biological hazards. While Ebola is fairly bad, it's not nearly as bad as the weaponized biological agents the military prepares for.

The field hospitals will undoubtedly deploy like it was a CBRN environment, and zealously observe decon processes.

On the downside, those poor people, will be stuck in MOPP suits for months on end.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by crypto » Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:35 am

raptor wrote:IMO the key thing is to review and re-fresh as required your current preps. Ebola (at this time) is not transmitted via airborne processes except perhaps via aerosol transmission. That means that avoidance and basic hygiene will be very effective in prevention.

What that means is that n-95 masks are likely to be less useful than disposable gloves and basic hygiene (like washing hands, not touching your eyes, covering an cuts/abrasions to avoid exposure).

However, it is clear that the following as a minimum should be on hand:
1) hand sanitizer
2) disposable gloves
3) bleach and similar cleaners
4) Isopropyl alcohol
5) PPE outer garments - a simple rain suit would be good or tyvek suits.
6) Eye protection
7) N-95 masks
Fortunately, Ebola is unlikely to ever develop an airborne vector. The virus' outer membrane is lipid (fat) based, which serves to make it very delicate in the grand scheme of things. Changing the fundamental structure of the virus is a pretty large leap for any mutation, so the chances of it happening on anything but a geological timescale are rather low.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Kathy in FL » Wed Sep 17, 2014 2:25 am

Crypto it may never reach efficient airborne transmissibility but WHO and CDC have already hypothesized that some changes within Ebola have created limited airborne transmissibility which accounts in some part for the increase in cases compared to all other outbreaks.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Wraith6761 » Wed Sep 17, 2014 6:41 am

Kathy in FL wrote:Crypto it may never reach efficient airborne transmissibility but WHO and CDC have already hypothesized that some changes within Ebola have created limited airborne transmissibility which accounts in some part for the increase in cases compared to all other outbreaks.
Any source links for this? I wasn't able to find anything on either the CDC or WHO sites (or any of the available studies I could find) that suggests that Ebola has managed to get even limited airborne transmission...there were a few 'what-if' hypothetical musings, but the closest it's been reported as becoming airborne is spreading through coughing/sneezing (by an infected person) blood/bodily fluids onto another person (usually even then it needs to hit a mucous membrane or open wound), which is no different than any other disease spread by blood/bodily fluids.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Wraith6761 » Wed Sep 17, 2014 6:47 am

raptor wrote:
IceWing wrote: Both kinds of masks were Amazon Prime, as were the boxes of latex gloves we bought... Took almost a WEEK to get everything... The supply chain is having some disruptions folks... Do NOT wait on stuff likely to become in short supply...

That is good to know. As with anything like this when you need it, odds are good a bunch of other folks need it also. The supply chain is designed with normal demand in mind.
Good thing to keep in mind, but don't read too far into it...we (Amazon) managed to kinda break UPS and FedEx...again. Third time in 9 months...and it'll probably happen again in Nov/Dec, so plan accordingly when ordering stuff.
Woods Walker wrote:...I don't think it matters if a backpack has Dora the Explorer on it. Based on my observations from years of hunting and fishing if something looks and acts like prey it will draw in predators.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:52 pm

Kathy in FL wrote:Crypto it may never reach efficient airborne transmissibility but WHO and CDC have already hypothesized that some changes within Ebola have created limited airborne transmissibility which accounts in some part for the increase in cases compared to all other outbreaks.
I think they have found it transmitted in aerosol form much like rabies can be transmitted in a very limited airborne manner. For instance rabies has documented instanced of a careless lab worker using in effect a "blender" which allowed the rabies virus to be turned into minute airborne particles which entered and uncovered wound or though the nose or eyes. Similarly there was a documented case of rabies transmission when researchers checking on bats entered a cave (bat cave :D ) that had a very high population of bats and the virus was transmitted through the high contamination level of bat "snot".

I could see that happening with ebola. That said it would have to be right set of circumstances.

Ironically the one thing that prevented ebola transmission previously was the near 100% fatality rate and relatively fast onset. Everyone got sick and 99.9% died before they could leave the area. As the number of survivors increase so does the possibility of a release of a still contagious person. The virus can be transmitted by almost any bodily fluid including semen. Ebola may be the ultimate STD. :shock:

They are very different diseases and i am not saying either are linked, but if you look at the spread of HIV the disease spread widely mainly as a result of sexual transmission. There may be a similar pattern with ebola.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Sun Sep 21, 2014 10:34 pm

A good article on ebola. The title is a bit melodramatic but it has some good take aways.

The ease with which it is transmitted:
The ease with which it is transmitted: through contact with bodily fluids, including sweat, tears, saliva, blood, urine, semen, etc., including objects that have come in contact with bodily fluids (such as bed sheets, clothing, and needles) and corpses.
The disproportionate percentage of care givers who are affected. (I have not confirmed this as fact if someone can confirm or deny this information it would be useful)
Affected parties are almost all medical professionals and family members, snared by Ebola while in the business of caring for their fellow humans. More strikingly, 75 percent of Ebola victims are women, people who do much of the care work throughout Africa and the rest of the world. In short, Ebola parasites our humanity.


http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-th ... ola-2014-9
As the Ebola epidemic in West Africa has spiraled out of control, affecting thousands of Liberians, Sierra Leonians, and Guineans, and threatening thousands more, the world’s reaction has been glacially, lethally slow. Only in the past few weeks have heads of state begun to take serious notice. To date, the virus has killed more than 2,600 people. This is a comparatively small number when measured against much more established diseases such as malaria,HIV/AIDS, influenza, and so on, but several factors about this outbreak have some of the world’s top health professionals gravely concerned:

Its kill rate: In this particular outbreak, a running tabulation suggests that 54 percent of the infected die, though adjusted numbers suggest that the rate is much higher.

Its exponential growth: At this point, the number of people infected is doubling approximately every three weeks, leading some epidemiologists to project between 77,000 and 277,000 cases by the end of 2014.

The gruesomeness with which it kills: by hijacking cells and migrating throughout the body to affect all organs, causing victims to bleed profusely.

The ease with which it is transmitted: through contact with bodily fluids, including sweat, tears, saliva, blood, urine, semen, etc., including objects that have come in contact with bodily fluids (such as bed sheets, clothing, and needles) and corpses.

The threat of mutation: Prominent figures have expressed serious concerns that this disease will go airborne, and there are many other mechanisms through which mutation might make it much more transmissible.

Terrifying as these factors are, it is not clear to me that any of them capture what is truly, horribly tragic about this disease.

The most striking thing about the virus is the way in which it propagates. True, through bodily fluids, but to suggest as much is to ignore the conditions under which bodily contact occurs. Instead, the mechanism Ebola exploits is far more insidious. This virus preys on care and love, piggybacking on the deepest, most distinctively human virtues.

Affected parties are almost all medical professionals and family members, snared by Ebola while in the business of caring for their fellow humans. More strikingly, 75 percent of Ebola victims are women, people who do much of the care work throughout Africa and the rest of the world. In short, Ebola parasites our humanity.

More than most other pandemic diseases (malaria, cholera, plague, etc.) and more than airborne diseases (influenza, swine flu, H5N1, etc.) that are transmitted indiscriminately through the air, this disease is passed through very minute amounts of bodily fluid. Just a slip of contact with the infected party and the caregiver herself can be stricken.

The images coming from Africa are chilling. Little boys, left alone in the street without parents, shivering and sick, untouchable by the throngs of people around them. Grown men, writhing at the door to a hospital, hoping for care as their parents stand helplessly, wondering how to help. Mothers and fathers, fighting weakness and exhaustion to move to the edge of a tent in order to catch a distant, final glimpse of a get-well video that their children have made for them.

If Ebola is not stopped, this disease can destroy whole families within a month, relatives of those families shortly thereafter, friends of those relatives after that, and on and on. As it takes hold (and it is taking hold fast), it cuts out the heart of family and civilization. More than the profuse bleeding and high kill rate, this is why the disease is terrifying. Ebola sunders the bonds that make us human.

Aid providers are now working fastidiously to sever these ties themselves, fighting hopelessly against the natural inclinations that people have to love and care for the ill. They have launched aggressive public information campaigns, distributed updates widely, called for more equipment and gear, summoned the military, tried to rein in the hysteria, and so on. Yet no sheet of plastic or latex can disrupt these human inclinations.

Such heroic efforts are the appropriate medical response to a virulent public health catastrophe. The public health community is doing an incredible job, facing unbelievable risks, relying on extremely limited resources.

Yet these efforts can only do half of the work. Infected parties—not all, to be sure, but some (enough)—cannot abide by the rules of disease isolation. Some will act without donning protective clothing. Some will assist without taking proper measures. And still others will refuse to enter isolation units because doing so means leaving their families and their loved ones behind, abandoning their humanity, and subjecting themselves to the terror of dying a sterile, lonely death.

It is tempting, at these times, to focus on the absurd and senseless actions of a few. One of the primary vectors in Sierra Leone is believed to have been a traditional healer who had been telling people that she could cure Ebola.

In Monrovia a few weeks back, angry citizens stormed a clinic and removed patients from their care. “There is no Ebola!” they are reported to have been shouting. More recently, the largest newspaper in Liberia published an article suggesting that Ebola is a conspiracy of the United States, aimed to undermine Africa. And, perhaps even more sadly, a team of health workers and journalists was just brutally murdered in Guinea. It is easy, in other words, to blame the spread on stupidity, or illiteracy, or ritualism, or conspiracy theories, or any number of other irrational factors.


But imagine: You are a parent whose child has suddenly come ill with a fever. Do you cast your child away and refuse to touch him? Do you cover your face and your arms? Stay back! Unclean! Or do you comfort your child when he asks for you, arms outstretched, to make the pain go away?

Imagine: You live in a home with five other family members. Your sister falls ill, ostensibly from Ebola, but possibly from malaria, typhoid, yellow fever, or the flu. You are aware of the danger to yourself and your other family members, but you have no simple means to move her, and she is too weak to move herself. What do you do?

Imagine: You are a child of 5 years old. Your mother is sick. She implores you to back away. But you are scared. What you need, more than anything, is a hug and a cry.

Who can blame a person for this? It is a terrible, awful predicament. A moral predicament. To stay, comfort, and give love and care to those who are in desperate need, or to shuttle them off into an isolation ward, perhaps never to see them again? What an inhumane decision this is.

What makes the Ebola virus so terrifying is not its kill rate, its exponential growth, the gruesome way in which it kills, the ease of transmission, or the threat of mutation, but rather that people who care can do almost nothing but sit on the sidelines and watch.

Many have asked whether Ebola could come here, come West. (The implication, in its way, is crass—as if to suggest that we need not be concerned about a tragedy unless it poses a threat to us.) We have been reassured that it will never spread widely here, because our public health networks are too strong, our hospitals too well-stocked. The naysayers may be right about this. But they are not right that it does not pose a threat to us.



For starters, despite the pretense, the West is not immune from absurd, unscientific thinking. We have our fair share of scientific illiteracy, skepticism, ritualism, and foolishness.

But beyond this, it is our similarities, not our differences, that make us vulnerable to this plague.

We are human. Every mechanism we have for caring—touching, holding, feeding, playing, warming, comforting, caressing—every mechanism that we use to bind us to our families and our neighbors, is preyed upon by Ebola.

We cannot seal each other into hyperbaric chambers and expect that once we emerge, the carnage will be over. We are humans, and we will care about our children and our families even if it means that we may die in doing so.

The lesson here is a vital one: People do not give up on humanity so very easily. Even if we persuade all of the population to forgo rituals like washing the dead, we will not easily persuade parents to keep from holding their sick children, children from clinging to their ailing parents, or children from playing and wrestling and slobbering all over one another. We tried to alter such behaviors with HIV/AIDS. A seemingly simple edict—“just lay off the sex with infected parties”—would seem all that is required to halt that disease. But we have learned over the decades that people do not give up sex so readily.

If you think curtailing sex is hard, love and compassion will be that much harder. Humans will never give this up—we cannot give this up, for it is fundamental to who we are. The more that medical personnel require this of people without also giving them methods to manifest care, the more care and compassion will manifest in pockets outside of quarantine. And the more humanity that manifests unchecked, the more space this virus has to grow. Unchecked humanity will seep through the cracks and barriers that we build to keep our families safe, and if left to find its own way, will carry a lethal payload.

The problem is double-edged. Ebola threatens humanity by preying on humanity. The seemingly simple solution is to destroy humanity ourselves—to seal everything off and let the disease burn out on its own. But doing so means destroying ourselves in order to save ourselves, which is no solution at all.

We must find a method of caring without touching, of contacting without making contact. The physiological barriers are, for the time being, necessary. But we cannot stop people from caring about one another, so we must create, for the time being, mechanisms for caring. Since we will never be able to beat back humanity, we must coordinate humanity, at the family level, the local level, and the global level.

The only one way to battle a disease that affixes itself parasitically to our humanity is to overwhelm it with greater, stronger humanity. To immunize Africa and the rest of the world with a blast of humanity so powerful that the disease can no longer take root. What it will take to beat this virus is to turn its most powerful vehicle, our most powerful weapon, against it.

Here are some things we can do:

Donate to the great organizations that are working tirelessly to bring this disease under control. They need volunteers, medical supplies, facilities, transportation, food, etc. Share information about Ebola, so people will learn about it, know about it, and know how to address it when it comes.

And inform and help others. It is natural at a time of crisis to call for sealing the borders, to build fences and walls that separate us further from outside threats. But a disease that infects humanity cannot easily be walled off in this way. Walling off just creates unprotected pockets of humanity, divisions between us and them: my family, your family; that village, this village; inside, outside.

One final thing.

When Prince Prospero, ill-fated protagonist of Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Masque of the Red Death,” locked himself in his castle to avoid a contagion that was sweeping his country—a disease that caused “profuse bleeding at the pores”—he assumed mistakenly that the only reasonable solution to his problem was to remove himself from the scene. For months he lived lavishly, surrounded by courtiers, improvisatori, buffoons, musicians, and wine, removed from danger while the pestilence wrought havoc outside.

As with much of Poe’s writing, Prospero’s tale does not end well. For six months, all was calm. He and his courtiers enjoyed their lives, secure and isolated from the plague laying waste to the countryside. Then, one night during a masquerade ball, the Red Death snuck into the castle, hidden behind a mask and a cloak, to afflict Prospero and his revelers, dropping them one by one in the “blood-bedewed halls.” Prospero’s security was a façade, leaving darkness and decay to hold “illimitable dominion over all.” The eventual intrusion that would be his undoing foretells of a danger in believing that we can keep the world’s ills at bay by keeping our distance.

If we seek safety by shutting out the rest of the world, we are in for a brutally ugly awakening. Nature is a cruel mistress, but Ebola is her cruelest, most devious trick yet.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by none1 » Sun Sep 21, 2014 11:11 pm

Just seconding the note in that article that the death rate is higher than 54%. I'm not sure what it is, but, its likely much higher than than the "run rate" being reporting.

EXAMPLE
5200 reported cases.
2600 deaths

2600 / 5000 = 52% death rate.

The problem is that likely a bunch of the 2400 that are alive will eventually die.

This method of calculating the death rate is misleading, as ebola is growing too fast, the deaths this week are from people who caught it a few weeks ago, while the reported are from people who got it much more recently.

So, using this currently reported death rate, and comparing to previous 80+ death rates and saying something has changed is wrong maths.

Its a great example though (pedagogically speaking). Calcing true death rates is hard in any fast growing pandemic, and early death rates are often understated.
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:27 pm

I am giving this thread a bump not just because of the Ebola news but also because flu season is right around the corner.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Chicago Zombie » Wed Oct 01, 2014 8:00 am

There is a FREE online class right now offered by Coursera & Penn State:
Epidemics - the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases.

I posted about this class in the ZSC:020 Chicagoland forum, viewtopic.php?f=97&t=113939#p2539173
but if somebody isn't signed in, they might miss that post. This class sounds too interesting to miss, so I wanted to cross post it here.

The class is 8 weeks long.
Starts: September 29, 2014
Ends: December 1, 2014
(This class will rerun in the future, it ran last year.)

https://www.coursera.org/course/epidemics

Students who successfully complete the class will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructors. :wink:

Here's the class description:
Not so long ago, it was almost guaranteed that you would die of an infectious disease. In fact, had you been born just 150 years ago, your chances of dying of an infectious disease before you've reached the tender age of 5 would have been extremely high.

Since then, science has come a long way in understanding infectious diseases - what they are, how they spread, and how they can be prevented. But diseases like HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis, or the flu are still major killers worldwide, and novel emerging diseases are a constant threat to public health. In addition, the bugs are evolving. Antibiotics, our most potent weapon against bacterial infections, are losing their power because the bacteria are becoming resistant. In this course, we'll explore the major themes of infectious diseases dynamics.

After we’ve covered the basics, we'll be looking at the dynamics of the flu, and why we're worried about flu pandemics. We'll be looking at the dynamics of childhood diseases such as measles and whooping cough, which were once considered almost eradicated, but are now making a comeback. We'll explore Malaria, and use it as a case study of the evolution of drug resistance. We'll even be looking at social networks - how diseases can spread from you to your friends to your friends' friends, and so on. And of course we’ll be talking about vaccination too. We’ll also be talking about how mobile phones, social media and crowdsourcing are revolutionizing disease surveillance, giving rise to a new field of digital epidemiology. And yes, we will be talking about Zombies - not human zombies, but zombie ants whose brains are hijacked by an infectious fungus.
ANNNNNNNNND, to enhance the learning experience there will be a massive virtual simulation of an epidemic unfolding during the course! :mrgreen:
The Grading Scale:
8 Quizzes at 10 points each (total of 80 points possible)
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raptor
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Wed Oct 01, 2014 10:25 am

Great links thanks for posting them!


Ebola is going to be in the news a lot and I suspect that we will see some more cases in the US. In times like this it is very important to both keep abreast of events but also be sure to view any and all news with a healthy skepticism.

The basic take away about Ebola is that it requires contact with contaminated bodily fluids (like sweat, semen, blood, blood, saliva, mucus, urine and feces) to be transmitted to you. There have been documented aerosol transmissions where aid workers were in a enclosed room with a lot of infected people, but that is not the normal vector route. If you stay 6+ feet away from an infected person (and any bodily fluids) you are not likely to get infected.

This is a disease that can be prevented with basic hygiene and basic PPE (unless obviously you are caring for or directly interacting with patients). In many ways the same basic procedures used to deal with hepatitis and HIVAIDS that have been place for years should be quite effective.

By basic hygiene I mean:

1) Wash your hands completely before preparing any kind of food, eating, touching your eyes and nose. Hand sanitizer is OK but plain soap and clean water is actually in many cases preferable and cheaper.

2) Wash any eating utensils with soap and water before using them.

3) if you come into contact with organic matter of any kind, wash your hands with soap and water.

4) Cover any cuts and or abrasions with a proper bandage to avoid exposure to any contaminants until they heal.

5) If you have any open cuts or abrasions on your hands wear gloves to protect them when dealing food prep, organic matter or anything that may lead to contaminants being introduced.

6) Do not share or reuse any needles.

Get my drift...basic hygiene.

Most blood borne pathogens are generally not absorbed through the skin but rather introduced through entry via the nose, eyes or cuts in the skin.

This is true for ebola, hepatitis, HIVAIDS and to large extent even the flu. Your mother was right when she told you as a child to wash your hands!



Please feel free to add and/or discuss your preparations for this risk.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Gingerbread Man » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:14 pm

Ok, is there a PPE suit inbetween "HEY, HERE THE FUCK I AM!" white or yellow and the "HOLY CRAP, IT'S ALL GOING TO FUCKING END" NBC suits? I'd very much like to find the middle ground here. Maybe tan, maybe green, something that isn't full on NBC suit and tyvex. I'm not opposed to the tyvex but the color is just a bit much. If I had to operate* in some contaiminated area I'd like to be a little, well, subdued not like a large "HEY OVER HERE!" suit.


*Not a phone operator. Just a dood doin' his thang.

I found this review while looking around at protective suits:

The end is near. Those with Hazmat suits will thrive. We and the cockroaches will inherit the earth. We will rule the infected.

The selection process to pick just the right suit will not be an easy task. It must protect me from numerous contaminants, be durable, and look stylish and classy. The selection of hot chicks could be greatly diminished after Armageddon... being stylish and classy will set me apart from the other losers. As the last woman I hit on so eloquently put it "Not even if you were the last man on earth and my very survival depended on it". OH HO!! We will see if her meth polluted, whisky influenced mind feels the same way after nuclear war.

I must put the Tychem Hazmat Suit through some tests before declaring it the royal outfit of the new king of a devastated world.
Test 1 - Nuclear exposure. Naturally I have no nuclear waste, so off to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear waste facility we go. After being denied access and laughed at extensively at the gate (very unprofessional), I decided to sneak in. I parked 200 yards down the road and in full Tychem Hazmat Suit I hopped the fence. Negative number one, in a full on sprint the suit's hood helmet fogs up quickly. It will cloud your vision so much that you don't even see a small platoon of security as they descend on you like killer bees. Footnote: this suit does not stop taser projectiles. Just so you are aware of that little tidbit. I woke up in jail. Tychem Hazmat Suit missing.

Test 2 - Four days and two hefty fines later - Picking up chicks.
I chose a local bar and a grocery store to give this test a wide range. Full yellow Tychem Hazmat Suit. Test was an ultimate failure. This will hurt the suit's overall rating. I was kicked in the nads, laughed at once again, refused service, and hit with a shopping cart. On the plus side, the girl who used pepper spray failed too, I didn't feel a thing.

Test 3 - Situations that I may find myself in.
Swimming - Not good. Suit began to fill with water 40 yards out. Started sinking. Thank goodness a couple park rangers came to check out why the big yellow buoy was moving and yelling curse words. Rangers used the words "first time ever" a lot and took multiple pictures with their cell phones to document our adventure together.
Sky diving - This one went bad quickly. The hood came off in two seconds... it smacked me in the face is now lost forever. One sleeve ripped up to the shoulder. The loose fabric flapped in the wind and beat me in the face for a full minute before I pulled the cord. It was like a soccer game and my head was the ball. That beating was worse than my Yucca Mountain beat down in test 1.

Final warning. Don't pass gas in this suit. It lingers forever and will make you ill. Think of it like sticking your head down the hole of an outhouse. Your eyes will water also... makes people think you are crying.
This suit did not do as well as I had hoped but is still winning so far. I will need to test other suits soon and design tests that are much less painful. Maybe a wind test in Kansas during tornado season. Maybe bear wrestling, or shark swimming. I will come up with something
.
Shrapnel wrote "nobody is trying to be a dick and give out warnings for every little thing" :|
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:49 pm

That is a good question. I will tell you what I have and suggest. I am sure others can chime in here.

My supplies are simple rain suits. They come in wide variety of colors. I have light blue ones for exactly the reason you mentioned. To be somewhat discrete.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Panoply-Work-We ... 0778323528

That and plain rain boots coupled with a combination of chemical gloves and latex exam gloves should provide protection. I have elbow length gloves because there are situations where that alone is adequate.

You can add a regular n-95 mask and face protection if you have get close to an infected person or clean up after them.

http://www.dynaweld.com.au/528/safety/e ... hield.html

http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-X-Large-26- ... ant+gloves

http://www.amazon.com/Disposable-Latex- ... ble+gloves

This BTW is the same gear I would use in a HAZMAT escape situation.
Disinfection of a contaminated area should not require anything more than an appropriate amount of bleach, soap and water.

http://www.cdc.gov/hicpac/Disinfection_ ... ction.html

The one caveat though about the above gear. If you deploy this because of a risk either real or imagined you should clean and decontaminate the gear before you start removing it. You should likewise store the gear separately from your living and food preparation area. Outside on a hanger should work. Do not introduce contaminated gear into an uncontaminated area. Also if you are not 100% certain the gear is not contaminated you should assume it is contaminated and treat it accordingly.

I would note that regular clothing like long pants, socks, shoes, long sleeve shirt and such should provide at some protection against ebola. That basic clothing is better than walking around barefoot in shorts and shirt sleeves.

I would note that in Africa the caregivers for the infected suffered a very high infection rate. Soiled clothing, linen, mops, towels, kleenex and eating utensils should be considered HAZMAT materials. They should be disinfected diligently or incinerated. Any trashcans, buckets of water in the buckets used to clean up bodily fluids likewise should be considered HAZMAT materials and disinfected properly.


IMO the disposable gloves are likely to be the most needed item followed closely by house hold bleach.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Gingerbread Man » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:00 pm

Cool, yeah I really don't need a NBC suit because well, anyone starts tossing that stuff around the future will be very bleak. Entire armies are taken out of the fight just to deal with the clean up and de-con, I doubt I could tackle that. And really, I'm not that concerned about nuclear and chemical threats.

However, serious illness that are easily passed do give me the heebie jeebies. I have the gloves, googles and masks. I have hoods too.

Anyway, I have always believed in discretion and not going full on milspec stuff.

Thanks, I'll look into the rain suits. I had not consider that but a rubber impermeable layer should be more than sufficent. If need be I could probably seal it up a little more with some duct tape.

What do you think?
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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by raptor » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:15 pm

Gingerbread Man wrote:Cool, yeah I really don't need a NBC suit because well, anyone starts tossing that stuff around the future will be very bleak. Entire armies are taken out of the fight just to deal with the clean up and de-con, I doubt I could tackle that. And really, I'm not that concerned about nuclear and chemical threats.

However, serious illness that are easily passed do give me the heebie jeebies. I have the gloves, googles and masks. I have hoods too.

Anyway, I have always believed in discretion and not going full on milspec stuff.

Thanks, I'll look into the rain suits. I had not consider that but a rubber impermeable layer should be more than sufficent. If need be I could probably seal it up a little more with some duct tape.

What do you think?
I think it is fine without duct tape if they have elastic cuffs and you over lap the coverage. For instance the elbow length gloves and the rain suit sleeve. However, duct tape would work well also.

The key problem is the head and face area which BTW is also a key risk area with mucus membranes in the nose, not forgetting of course the eyes and mouth. You can get NBC hoods which provide greater coverage of the head and neck than say a simple rain hood.

http://www.interamer.com/nbchoodforgasmasks.aspx

However you can also make your own out of a simple garbage bag. Coupled with a splatter resistant face shield should be good.

BTW in HAZMAT situations where you are decontaminating the gear be sure the decontamination area is also well away from living and food prep areas...like in the back yard well away from the house.

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Re: Pandemic Preparations

Post by Mikeyboy » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:32 pm

Gingerbread Man wrote:Ok, is there a PPE suit inbetween "HEY, HERE THE FUCK I AM!" white or yellow and the "HOLY CRAP, IT'S ALL GOING TO FUCKING END" NBC suits? I'd very much like to find the middle ground here. Maybe tan, maybe green, something that isn't full on NBC suit and tyvex. I'm not opposed to the tyvex but the color is just a bit much. If I had to operate* in some contaiminated area I'd like to be a little, well, subdued not like a large "HEY OVER HERE!" suit.

Touching on what Raptor said, another option is Driduck rain suits. They sell them for $20 in sporting good stores and walmart. They are the econo line of Frogg Toggs, basically its rainsuit made of material similar to tyvex but a little more breatheable. The good thing they come in earthtones like Khaki and green. And if there is never a worldwide pandemic, but some other SHTF event that involves rain....you have a rain suit.

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