13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Topics in this category pertain to planning. Discussions include how to prepare yourself, your family and your community for catastrophes and what you plan to do when they hit you.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

User avatar
slicknickns
*
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:56 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later
Dawn of the Dead, 1977

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by slicknickns » Fri Feb 07, 2014 2:34 am

Ten Eight wrote: Here almost all the houses are block and outswing. Even with pine jambs (a lot of newer homes here have PVC), there are so many dang 3" screws holding the door in that you have to break the whole side of the door to get inside. SWAT hates commerical block buildings, as 90% of the commerical doors here have metal jambs. PITA to get inside, not counting all the hurricane Miami Dade approved stuff. The ram works well only when your ramming WITH the movement of the door lol.
I've read many times, that the hardest door to break down is the trailer park door, due to it's typical nature of opening outward.
Image

Thug Hunter
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by Thug Hunter » Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:59 am

I work as a cop in one of America's 20 largest cities. I've responded to at least several hundred (probably over a thousand) burglaries-- attempts, in progress, and mostly after the fact, to take a report. A few things I've noticed:

The vast majority occur during during the day, while the resident is at work. In the US, fewer than 10% of burglaries occur while the resident is home. Compare that to England, at about 55%. That is just one benefit of the second ammendment to our Constitution. One downside is that night time/ resident home burglars can be very dangerous. Many seem to head straight for the kitchen to grab a knife. That way, they won’t be armed if we stop them in the street before or after the burglary.

The best deterrent seems to be a large, loud dog. I have not seen a successful burglary with one present, but I have seen aborted attempts.

Second best deterrent seems to be an alarm. I have seen a few successful burglaries on alarmed homes, but the criminal just grabs something fast, like tv, video games, or dvd player, and leaves immediately. Without an alarm, they have time to thoroughly search the house, taking many more things like irreplaceable heirloom items. With alarms, they don't seem to make it to the bedroom (where sentimental irreplaceable items usually are) because they know the cops are coming.

Without the alarm (no time constraint on them) they can spend hours tearing a home apart. If you hide it and they have the time, they will find it. Seriously—that perfect hiding place is neither. The damage is unimaginable to most people. In order to have a complete report, we have to leave an addition form with those people because there are so many things taken, moved, or damaged that it takes many hours, even days, to figure out the total loss.

The nearly all (probably over 99%) of forced entries I've seen have been through a door, usually by kicking, but sometimes by breaking a window on the door, reaching in, and unlocking the door. This can be avoided by having a double cylinder dead bolt. The only window entries I can recall were through already opened windows. It can happen through a closed window, though. I am aware of attempted entry through locked windows that were stopped by alarms.

Gun safes seem to work well. Bolt them to the floor and wall studs. While I haven't been to such a call, I am aware of a few burglaries in which several hundred pound safes were taken and apparently opened later. Fire proof boxes and low end “safes” are often pried open during the burglary with basic tools and minimal effort. I know because I’ve opened them during search warrants.

The only burglars I can recall us catching in the act were because neighbors realized something was wrong and called us. It really does pay to know your neighbors.

No house can be made completely burglar proof, but adding a lot of layers of security adds up. I hate to say it like this, but if your home looks like it is the most secure in the area, they will hit someone else.

Have a list of all serial numbers on the items in your house that have numbers. In the age of computers, have copies on thumb drives at work and a relative’s house. You can even email it to yourself as a pdf. That way you can access it anywhere you have internet access. If you can’t give your serial numbers to the cops, you won’t get your items back.
"Time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted."--unknown
"Time spent on rehearsal is never wasted."--Thug Hunter

Thug Hunter
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by Thug Hunter » Mon Mar 10, 2014 9:05 am

slicknickns wrote:I've read many times, that the hardest door to break down is the trailer park door, due to it's typical nature of opening outward.
Any outward opening door is tougher to break down. They are usually easy to pry out. I once handled an apartment burglary with an outward opening door. The burglar simply removed the hinges.
"Time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted."--unknown
"Time spent on rehearsal is never wasted."--Thug Hunter

taskforce71
* *
Posts: 250
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 12:40 pm

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by taskforce71 » Sun Apr 13, 2014 4:19 pm

KnightoftheRoc wrote: And, when you get rid of those boxes, rip them up- it's not just easier for the trash man, but safer- you can put them printed side down, instead of advertising your nifty new purchase with the empty box out on the curb.
But that doesn't mean they won't poke around inside a trash can. Try to put the trash out at the very last minute, when you hear the big ol trash truck coming to the neighborhood. It makes me nervous how silly my neighbors are. Many still leave the boxes of new Xmas stuff in PLAIN VIEW next to their trash cans. I won't name the neighborhood but one neighbor has a spiffy new stereo and another got some very expensive power tools for Xmas. This is why I dread Dec. 27 more than any other day on the calendar. I fear that the burglars will check my trash AFTER breaking into the neighbor's house after finding out about his $500 worth of power tools. I always put the boxes in my car and DRIVE to a public dumpster but then, you'll do that just once a year. Why take the risk?

taskforce71
* *
Posts: 250
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 12:40 pm

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by taskforce71 » Sun Apr 13, 2014 4:23 pm

Thug Hunter, a question about guns: it shocks me how much effort crooks go to try to remove serial numbers from stolen guns. Does that make it impossible for you to trace them? My handgun
is registered but the stupid manufacturer put the S/N on a PLATE. It would take little effort to pry it off. There is a matching number carved on the barrel but then, they can switch the barrel to conceal its
original place of registration.

User avatar
PhunkyMunky
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2010 3:21 am

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by PhunkyMunky » Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:48 pm

If I am home and someone breaks in.... I'm going after them with buckshot. I have a light on my Mossy and in a dark home, with your eyes adjusted to the light, it's gonna hurt when 150 lumens lights you up. And that will be followed by buckshot. I'll not rely on OC (I have used it for work, it's effective, but if you're in my house you're getting shot) as I have seen people just wipe it off their eyes and throw it back (foam OC) or they just act like you seasoned them. And it gets scary after that. OC works more often than not. In doors you could get away with foam. It's much better suited for inside. It doesn't make the whole building have to deal with it. But be aware that pepper spray doesn't work on everyone. If they are wearing contacts, the effects could be permanent.

I used to do security patrols for Low Income Housing projects (Mostly section 8 housing) and after working one night my work partner and I went to Denny's to see his girlfriend and give her a hard time. It was a popular spot for local PD as well. We got our coffee and I got up to go take a leak and my buddy put some OC into my coffee. When I returned I took a drink and spit it all over the place grabbing for my water. Well, I returned the favor... Bad idea. There were probably 6 cops in there, who didn't know we had done this but soon knew SOMEONE let it off because the air circulation system had taken fumes and spread it to the kitchen, bathrooms, and the rest of the dining area. :clap: I never seen a place clear out so fast! The cops looked at us, knew we did it, and they had a laugh at our expense. No harm no foul. Just a story for the guys. 8-)

So if you're going to use OC, use foam.
"History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen."—Enoch
Powell, Member of the British Parliament

Thug Hunter
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by Thug Hunter » Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:32 pm

taskforce71 wrote:Thug Hunter, a question about guns: it shocks me how much effort crooks go to try to remove serial numbers from stolen guns. Does that make it impossible for you to trace them? My handgun
is registered but the stupid manufacturer put the S/N on a PLATE. It would take little effort to pry it off. There is a matching number carved on the barrel but then, they can switch the barrel to conceal its
original place of registration.
It's been a while since I checked this thread, sorry.

It seems to be fairly rare that criminals remove serial numbers from guns. It is a federal offense to remove one, or possess a gun with an obliterated serial number. There are forensic lab techs that specialize in serial number restoration. I'm told they are fairly successful, but nothing is perfect.

In the end, a criminal may not be charged with possessing a stolen gun, but will be charged with possessing one with an obliterated serial number.

However, some very old guns don't have serial numbers.
"Time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted."--unknown
"Time spent on rehearsal is never wasted."--Thug Hunter

User avatar
Scottyhikes
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 7:03 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Zombieland. WORLD WAR Z. Dawn of the Dead
Location: 93446 Adelaide

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by Scottyhikes » Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:26 am

hawk55732 wrote:Unfortunatly, now days you would probably lose and have to pay money to the burgalar. Thats the sad state that our legal system has come to.
:D

Yes, this is so true.

But theres nearly no difference between other countrys system and ours. We´re not alone.
My friends are my estate.

Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.

zombiepreparation
* * * * *
Posts: 1120
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:21 am

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by zombiepreparation » Wed Oct 22, 2014 10:48 am

Tagged

27Island
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2015 7:27 am

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by 27Island » Thu Apr 23, 2015 9:26 am

A good collection of thoughts i appreciate the effort but burglars starts from here only, they have many tactics hidden under their arms

User avatar
AS556
* * * * *
Posts: 1099
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2011 6:31 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead ('04),28 Days Later,Shaun of the Dead,Zombieland
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: 13 things (and more) a burglar won't tell you

Post by AS556 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 11:34 am

Tagged

Post Reply

Return to “Contingency Planning & Preparation”