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Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 6:35 pm
by gobobbie
The water will eventually mix. What they are doing is putting water in the basement to hold against water from the outside. The basement/foundation walls would collapse because of the pressure against them coming from water soaked ground outside.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:53 pm
by KEVINMN
Even if there is some mixing of fresh/contaminated water, if you maintain constant outward fresh water pressure, the contamination may be greatly reduced if the structure and contents ( wood, carpet, fabric, etc) have been pre-saturated with fresh water prior to introduction of contaminates.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 1:06 am
by gart43
KEVINMN wrote:Even if there is some mixing of fresh/contaminated water, if you maintain constant outward fresh water pressure, the contamination may be greatly reduced if the structure and contents ( wood, carpet, fabric, etc) have been pre-saturated with fresh water prior to introduction of contaminates.
Exactly how would you plan to do that?

Oh btw, nice to see another member from Minnesota.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 8:35 am
by IceWing
Well, we live in an area that may or may not have been flooded during the 1913 flooding of the Miami Valley here in Ohio. I know that my town was flooded, but have been unable to find any kind of maps to indicate just how far it went. We're about a mile from the river, so I can't imagine the volume of water which would be required in order to reach our home. There's also some railway berms between us and the river which I would think would help to serve as a levy of sorts, allowing the water to go elsewhere... Couple that with the fact that the massive flood control systems which were developed after the 1913 flood (designed to take over 140% of the water which they estimated came down in March 1913), means I feel relatively safe.

I'd actually consider getting the insurance, but we're not sure how much longer we're going to be in our current house... We've been there 8 years now, and the worst I've seen is a small damp spot in the basement after about a week of heavy rain (I think it percolated UP from underneath, and found a weak spot in the basement floor)

Additionally, if it does flood, the only things that are in the basement which could not be quickly moved upstairs are the furnace and hot water heater...

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:51 am
by raptor
A link to an interesting video:

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-36765?iref=topnews" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

This shows what people could do in 4 hours to prepare they were then forced out under threat of arrest, even though the water did arrive for several more hours.

If flooding is possible do not wait until the last minute to act. This couple by their own admission could have removed most of their possessions if they had a few more hours. They could have moved even more up to the safety of the attic.

They blamed their inaction on the fact that the authorities told them the water would not affect them the day before. However, the water rose higher than they anticipated. If a flood is possible make advance preparations.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 7:30 pm
by gobobbie
There is a lot you can do if you have enough warning. We were flooded (1-2 feet) during Hurricane Floyd. To give you an example of how the water can rise. A county sherriff across the street got off shift, went upstairs to get a shower. At the time there was only heavy rain. In the next twenty minutes there was six plus feet in that area due to streams overflowing.
A lot of the post cleanup involves stuff you might not realize. Your oven has be disposed of because the insulation will wick up water and it will just mildew. Same with your reefer.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 2:17 am
by shillard
gart43 wrote:Well do to recent flooding in the Midwest (right in my home state actually) that affected several members of my family (guess who they get to stay with :D) I wanted to ask my fellow ZSers what they plan to do as far as having Flood Preps?

I mean do you store sand bags and such for protection? Own a pump to try and pump water away? Own flood insurance?
How not to do it:

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 32&t=24744" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 6:54 pm
by gart43
That was EXTREMELY informative shilard. Really nice set of posts you made.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 9:12 pm
by SavageArcher
I live less than 2 miles from the Rio Grande river and about 30 miles from the Gulf of Mexico. Fortuntely I live on a fairly high area about a mile from the nearest levee. I remember some bad flooding when I was a kid. Hurricane Allen I think. None of it was near me, but some folks within a 10 miles of home got it bad.

I'm surprised no one has list a boat as a flood prep. A 12 foot Jon boat with or without an outboard is pretty handy. You can use it to transport belongings and family to high ground once the flow currents subside and get to people in need without exposing yourself to any nasty water.

There been a lot of substandard developments in my area over the years. A direct hit from a Cat 3 Hurricane or bigger would make a mess of the place. It's bad enough now whenever a 2 or 3 inch downpour hits.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 9:24 pm
by raptor
SavageArcher wrote: I'm surprised no one has list a boat as a flood prep. A 12 foot Jon boat with or without an outboard is pretty handy. You can use it to transport belongings and family to high ground once the flow currents subside and get to people in need without exposing yourself to any nasty water.
I did not list a boat because I think you should be long gone by the time you need a boat. If everyone did that there is no need for boat.

I would also caution any but the most experienced mariner to avoid flood waters and any associated currents. A heavily loaded small flatboat with little free board in a strong current is asking for trouble unless you are very familiar with boats. My experience in Katrina without the current was quite an eye opener. Debris is everywhere, if you are traveling on a flooded street there are submerged objects like signs, mail boxes and street obstructions. If the outboard hits something and damages the lower unit or shear pin your engine will be disabled. In a strong current, a disabled engine is extremely dangerous.

Get out before you need a boat is my advice.

Re: Flood Preps?

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 10:15 pm
by bethanyb
My flood preps include living on top of a really big hill, next to a valley. If my house floods, well then we should have already started building an ark.