Garage Doors

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pyratemime
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Garage Doors

Post by pyratemime » Sat Dec 15, 2007 1:43 pm

I was looking at my garage door today and the question came to me, how well will this door hold up to Zombies banging against it to get in? What about efforts to break it down by raiders? Or to simply lift it up by thieves? Does anyone have any insight into A. any of the above questions? or B. ways to secure/reinforce that door?
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"It wouldn't hurt you people to think like a serial killer every now and again. You know just for the sake of prevention!" - Foamy the Squirrel
DaJoker wrote:In regards to us "normal" humans... well that's why its best to follow pyratemime's advice.

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Post by shenkhu » Sat Dec 15, 2007 1:53 pm

put a heavy lock on the doorchain, as high as possible,.

If you do not plan to use it, nail it down, reinforce with whatever you have, garage doors are not suited to hold impacts, and you can lift it with the proper liverage, a garage door is a big weakspot on a BOL.

B: Secure your door with 2*4 on both sides or simply, put something at front of it
in the begining, there were man and wolfes, not quite enemies, not quite friends.

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Post by undeaddeadguy » Sat Dec 15, 2007 2:06 pm

My garage opens using a wheel on rail system. I normally just jam a screwdriver into the rail, underneath the wheel, and it makes it damn near impossible to open from the outside (I know, I've tried). Give that a shot.

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crypto
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Post by crypto » Sat Dec 15, 2007 2:07 pm

My rolling garage door is pretty stout. even if someone were to cut through the sheet metal, they'd have a hard time getting through the rolled edges of each section of steel, those are 18" apart. My garage door has 2 locking lugs that engage via springloaded cable into the rolling rails on either side of the door. I think the only way you'd get in would be to take a sawzall to it, but a sawzall would defeat pretty much any metal defensive structure you can think of, steel bars included.
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shenkhu
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Post by shenkhu » Sat Dec 15, 2007 2:13 pm

not trying to discourage anyone, but push hard enough on the middle of the door, and a breach is created. 5_10 raiders with a "bélier"(english help please) or many zombs should be enough to break about any garage door...
in the begining, there were man and wolfes, not quite enemies, not quite friends.

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Post by andygates » Sat Dec 15, 2007 2:58 pm

Lots of garage doors are weak as hell. One sheet of mostly unbraced steel is very easy to breach. I've always treated the interior door to the garage as an outside door as far as security goes.
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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:06 pm

Plenty of companies sell security and industrial garage doors.

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Post by shenkhu » Sat Dec 15, 2007 4:32 pm

ZombieKraft wrote:Plenty of companies sell security and industrial garage doors.

$$$$$ not everybody can afford
in the begining, there were man and wolfes, not quite enemies, not quite friends.

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Post by pyratemime » Sat Dec 15, 2007 5:50 pm

I have a normal residential garage door and I use it on a daily basis (it is no nice finally having my own garage!) so I am trying to find ways to reinforce it while leaving it usable and not over-taxing the motor. What I have considered is getting aluminum slats and attaching them between the existing structural braces. This I am looking at as a permanent security upgrade. From there for temporary situations I was going to A. place locks on the tracks, I am also now going to put a lock on the chain as suggested, B. us 2x4 braced up from the center of the garage door to the ceiling. Any other thoughts?
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"It wouldn't hurt you people to think like a serial killer every now and again. You know just for the sake of prevention!" - Foamy the Squirrel
DaJoker wrote:In regards to us "normal" humans... well that's why its best to follow pyratemime's advice.

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Post by Flea » Sat Dec 15, 2007 6:37 pm

Down in SC (on coast) we have to be built to hurricane type code. The garage door in my house has a hurricane reinforcement kit on it which is basically metal studs laying on the short side against the door across each panel of the door (they are fastened with lag screws to the door). I am pretty sure they sell this as a kit an you may be able to get it or order it from Home Depot, Lowe's or a Garage Door installer in your area....
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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 6:58 pm

rflemen wrote:Down in SC (on coast) we have to be built to hurricane type code. The garage door in my house has a hurricane reinforcement kit on it which is basically metal studs laying on the short side against the door across each panel of the door (they are fastened with lag screws to the door). I am pretty sure they sell this as a kit an you may be able to get it or order it from Home Depot, Lowe's or a Garage Door installer in your area....
bob vila has a thing or two on this
http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library/St ... A2021.html

Secure Door is the only Florida Building Code approved garage door retrofit kit available on the market, and it is also designed to be installed by the do-it-yourselfer.
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Last edited by ZombieKraft on Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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pyratemime
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Post by pyratemime » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:03 pm

Rfeman that is brilliant! Exactly what I am looking for.
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"It wouldn't hurt you people to think like a serial killer every now and again. You know just for the sake of prevention!" - Foamy the Squirrel
DaJoker wrote:In regards to us "normal" humans... well that's why its best to follow pyratemime's advice.

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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:05 pm

updated my post with pics. rfleman thanks for the hat tip

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Post by Flea » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:27 pm

Yep that is it. My Garage door looks exactly like that first pic...
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ZombieKraft
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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:28 pm

This video is pretty informative:

http://www.securedoor.com/index.php?page=dsl

The system looks simple enough that you could probably make the same setup out of steel poles and a little bit of hardware. Their aluminum poles seem to bend in the video so steel might be better anyway (who knows sometimes it's good for a door to give a little).

Nice to know for those who are short on change. That's pretty amazing. Original door failure at 70mph and this simple addition strengthens it to 180mph. Now all you need is some precut 10 gauge sheet metal to strap to the outside of the door and your garage doors are completely secure! If anyone wants to look at he parts the installation PDF can be downloaded here:
http://www.securedoor.com/index.php?page=installation

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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:56 pm

Heh this is what FEMA wants you to do:
http://www.fema.gov/pdf/plan/prevent/howto/how2016.pdf

Looks like their advice sucks about as much as their response to Katrina.


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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 8:00 pm

Just in case anyone wants to know what the 4 most likely areas of failure are:
After Hurricane Andrew, a team of experts examined
homes that had failed and ones that had survived.
They found four areas that should be checked for
weakness—the roof, windows, doors, and if you have
one, garage door.
http://www.fema.gov/pdf/rebuild/recover/agstwnd.pdf

Pretty much common sense. It looks like garage door makes up 80% though. So this little device is a godsend. Thankyou rfleman!

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Post by ZombieKraft » Sat Dec 15, 2007 8:13 pm

Looks like schmucker is the best doors I can find that still look normal:

http://www.schmuckergaragedoors.com/doors/dab.html

only 24 gauge steel though. Anyone know of any better?

The result was the Hurricane Master™, the industry's first garage door system engineered with a structurally reinforced load-component concealed within the perimeter of each door section. This patented structural component transforms the door into a monolithic wind barrier that is better able to resist the effects of severe windstorms.
Built-In Windload Resistance System in Each Door Section

Extensive independent testing confirms how DAB's Hurricane Master™ is able to withstand the intense pushing and pulling effects of extreme wind velocities from 90 MPH to over 150 MPH in both coastal and inland wind zones for the broadest wind coverage available.

....

Slender 2 1/4" u-bars can be easily added to meet and exceed the strictest wind codes.
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Post by TravisM.1 » Sat Dec 15, 2007 8:18 pm

A couple side latches would keep it from being lifted open easily-
http://www.doityourself.com/invt/6460521
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Post by SweetTea » Sat Dec 15, 2007 8:42 pm

ZombieKraft wrote:Heh this is what FEMA wants you to do:
http://www.fema.gov/pdf/plan/prevent/howto/how2016.pdf

Looks like their advice sucks about as much as their response to Katrina.


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What's wrong with this? It's not comprehensive in the least, but it helps to reinforce the panels themselves. Getting stouter brakets isn't the end solution, but it's way better than nothing.

Be it raiders or weather, it seems like there are 4 forces you have to worry about:
1-lifting up on the door
If I were a raider, I would try this method before anything else, since it's the way the door was designed to move. This can be solved by bolting a _| |_ to the floor with anchor bolts and then bolting a T to the bottom of the door so that the "stem" of the T fits between the two brackets. Then you could drill a hole through all three and slip a bolt in it when you need extra security (this could be for special occasions or every night, depending on how worried you are about your door).

2-sucking "out" on the door
This can be solved by something like the securedoor system that Zombiekraft shared with us (thanks btw). Either DIY or buy a kit, you choose. The FEMA suggestion of strengthening the individual panels helps this too.

3-pushing in to cause torque on the hinges and bend the door
This is the classic battering ram to center mass idea. Because of the torque being exerted on the hinges and tracks, this seems like the thing to worry about the most. See number 2.

4-pushing in to knock the hinges off of their bolts
This is taking a sledge to the corners of the door because the tracks are usually the weakest parts of the door. The door itself remains relatively whole, it's just taken off it's mounts. The tracks could be reinforced without inhibiting the movement of the door by bolting a U-shaped piece of steel around them.

P.S. +1 on treating the door from the garage to the house as an external one.

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Post by ZombieKraft » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:25 am

What's wrong with this?
FEMA is a highly funded organization that failed miserably when responding to Katrina. When it comes to information volunteer organizations provide much clearer, precise and comprehensive information.

That's what is wrong with it.

EDIT: Damnit, one of my posts didn't go through. I'm too tired to retype it all but here is a much more thorough site than FEMA's
http://www.ibhs.org/publications/
on garages
http://www.ibhs.org/publications/view.asp?cat=78&id=555
here's another
http://redcross.tallytown.com/library/H ... trofit.pdf

ok I'm done. I had other lin

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Post by Ranked Below » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:50 am

If you're stuck out, with nothing, good steel bar in one of the slats, two holeson either side of the metal and the brick....
Bam, a good no-push lock.
INFORM

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Post by SweetTea » Sun Dec 16, 2007 11:03 am

ZombieKraft wrote:
What's wrong with this?
FEMA is a highly funded organization that failed miserably when responding to Katrina. When it comes to information volunteer organizations provide much clearer, precise and comprehensive information.

That's what is wrong with it.
Nobody's going to argue with you on the point that FEMA is a wholly incompetent, bloated sack of lose. However, this plan does strengthen garage doors, which is what they set out to do. Yes, the plan is laughable in its inadequacy, but it's better than nothing. When you compared this plan to the management of katrina, it sounded like you were suggesting that following FEMA's advice would weaken the door in the same way the FEMA got in the way of many relief efforts in NOLA. Also, FEMA has to cater to the average citizen, and the average citizen is perfectly content to evacuate, let the house blow down, and rebuild with the insurance money. If I were making a website about how to harden a garage door to hurricanes, this plan would be a the "light" level, with a medium and heavy plan next to it. Yes, it's absurd to think that this will protect you from anything stronger than a tropical storm, but it's better than nothing.

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Re: Garage Doors

Post by Biff » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:29 pm

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Last edited by Biff on Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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