WaterBOB: Emergency Water Supply

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Seanwins
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WaterBOB: Emergency Water Supply

Post by Seanwins » Sat Nov 24, 2007 3:33 pm

https://www.waterbob.com/


I saw this thing on TV and thought it was pretty cool. There is a video at the link which demonstrates and explains everything. Of course, this only works if you are able to anticipate a water shortage.

The waterBOB™ is a water containment system that holds up to 100 gallons of fresh drinking water in any standard bathtub in the event of an emergency. Constructed of heavy duty food grade plastic, the waterBOB™ keeps water fresh and clean for drinking, cooking, washing and flushing. Water stored in an open bathtub, with dirt, soap film and exposure to debris will spoil and become useless.

During a hurricane or tropical storm, water main breaks and storm surges can interrupt or even contaminate your water supply. It is during these conditions the waterBOB™ may be used for temporary water storage. Constructed of heavy duty plastic that is FDA compliant for food storage, the waterBOB™ keeps water fresh and clean for up to 2 weeks.

The waterBOB™ is very easy to use. Simply lay the liner in any standard bathtub, attach the fill sock to the faucet and fill the bladder to capacity, which takes approximately 20 minutes. A siphon pump is included to easily dispense the water into jugs or pitchers. Never wait in line again to buy expensive bottled water! Be prepared with the waterBOB™.

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Post by Indiana » Sat Nov 24, 2007 3:53 pm


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Post by Seanwins » Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:18 pm

Just when I thought I had something constructive to say..... :cry:

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Post by acropolis5 » Sun Nov 25, 2007 1:14 pm

I'm seriously thinking of buying the WATERBOB. But, I have two questions: 1) How do you empty it if it turns out you don't need it for an emergercy; and 2) How do you dry it out before you put it back in storage? I've e-mailed the company with these questions. Back to you when I get a reply.

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Post by acropolis5 » Sun Nov 25, 2007 1:15 pm

I'm seriously thinking of buying the WATERBOB. But, I have two questions: 1) How do you empty it if it turns out you don't need it for an emergercy; and 2) How do you dry it out before you put it back in storage? I've e-mailed the company with these questions. Back to you when I get a reply.

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Post by ZombieGranny » Sun Nov 25, 2007 1:26 pm

It's designed to be disposable - one time use only. The material is very thin and won't stand up to repeated uses.

I don't know from personal experience - Another site I belong to has discussed these with several people who have one..
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Post by raptor » Sun Nov 25, 2007 1:37 pm

I bought one and I agree it should be considered a one time disposable item.
It is good quality and worth the price, but A food grade barrel though more expensive is probably a better buy since it can be reused easily.

I would also point out that you can store the same amount of water in bath tub without this bag. Just fill up the tub.

This bag may be good if you do not have a bath tub but say only a shower in your apartment/office.

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Post by Seanwins » Sun Nov 25, 2007 2:27 pm

raptor wrote:I bought one and I agree it should be considered a one time disposable item.
It is good quality and worth the price, but A food grade barrel though more expensive is probably a better buy since it can be reused easily.

I would also point out that you can store the same amount of water in bath tub without this bag. Just fill up the tub.

This bag may be good if you do not have a bath tub but say only a shower in your apartment/office.
We keep the tub pretty clean, but I dont know if I would want to drink water out of it.

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Post by Jamie » Sun Nov 25, 2007 2:29 pm

24 hours without water will help you rationalize the filtering capabilities of a bandana if that's all you have...

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Post by rpc » Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:26 pm

One of these fills a certain need, so if it's what you need, then go ahead and get one.

It would, however, require a bathtub (or similar structure) to work. I'm pretty sure it would collapse under its own weight if just left standing by itself.

But for most situations, I think merely filling the bathtub with water would prove adequate (as long as you have additional water set aside in more appropriate containers for drinking and cooking). Also, unless your bathtub is extremely dirty, I would think that boiling would make it reasonably safe to drink. After all, the water you're drinking has been around billions of years anyway, and has passed through much worse places than the average bathtub.

But the vast majority of the water that most people use is not used for drinking. Storing water for drinking and cooking, and then using the bathtub for that additional water seems like the best plan.

I haven't tried the following method. (And it's usually a good idea to try things before actually needing them, since unforseen problems usually arise.) But I have heard of another method of storing drinking water in the bathtub. It will take longer, and there's probably more possibility of waste. But you can use standard garbage bags (not treated with insecticide, yadda, yadda). Again, they won't support their weight by themselves. But several bags in the bathtub will support each other. Begin by covering the drain plug and any other sharp items with something like a towel. It might be helpful to place some water in the tub itself. Then, place one bag under the faucet, fill it partially, and then move it to the back of the tub. Repeat this process, until the tub is full of water-filled bags. Then, you will probably need to top off the indivdual bags (since you won't be able to move them full). A hose would be very helpful, but you could probably just pour in the water with a container. In fact, it would probably be best to start with several empty bags pre-positioned in the tub, and use the hose to fill them from the get-go. Leave the openings of all of the bags above the water line.

Basically, the bags will support each other. Essentially, you will have a tub full of water, with pieces of plastic separating different parts of the water.

If one or more bags spring a leak, you will still have the water, although it will be possibly contaminated.

It seems to me that an even easier method would be to lay a piece of (clean) plastic sheeting at the bottom of the tub, and then fill the tub normally.

Again, this gizmo certainly has its place. If a lot of people buy one and have a safe supply of drinking water as a result, then this is a good thing. And it's probably much more convenient than my makeshift methods. But I don't see this thing as something that many hardcore preppers would need.

Also, once again, I have not tested this method, so I am unaware of any potential pitfalls. As with most survival skills, giving it a dry run is probably a good idea if you think this is something you might want to do in an emergency.

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