Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

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doitnstyle1
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Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by doitnstyle1 » Thu Feb 28, 2019 12:04 am

Admin merge if a dupe but I tried my best to search.

So out of the blue, it suddenly dawned on me, the boiled or treated water taste like crap. I started to think about the problem and how boiling water really is one of the best ways to treat water. I started thinking about how to overcome the bad taste problem. The epiphanous moment when I realized that tea was an important part of English culture as well as around the world simply to bring flavor to boiled and treated water.
Stores quite well. Smaller packages can we stored bug out bags and everyday carrys. Many have medicinal purposes and can be packed away as I do in med kits, like ginger root tea for stomach ailments, mint tea for breathing problems etc.
I'm not huge tea drinker now, mostly coffee, but somehow I've acquired cabinet full of tea. I was getting ready to just gather it all up and throw it out in the trash as I have not used it in a couple of years. Although some of this may still not be any good or have some of the same effectiveness drama I am reconsidering throwing it out and maybe even start collecting Morty and ceiling and storing it properly.
I think back to all the years I spent in the field thinking how much drinking plain old water sucks! All this time I could have been like the Brits and have tea. I think it's something I might have to start getting used to drinking on a regular basis to get accustomed again.
I've been thinking more and more about herbalism the medical benefits that some of the tease may have. Short-term their effects may not be so noticeable, but over time they may have a better effect and taking medications.
I would very much like to hear other people's input on this matter and I would love to hear any personal experiences or family recipes or medicinal purposes for tea.
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by NT2C » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:42 am

While I still have to have my two big mugs of strong coffee every morning (or whatever time I get my lazy, retired ass out of bed) I have long been a tea drinker. My beverage of choice, other than coffee, is sweet tea (a southern habit I'm in full approval of), though I do like tea warm, hot, room temp, whatever, and can take it with or without any of the traditional embellishments, such as sugar, lemon, milk, etc.

I am somewhat picky about types of tea, however. I dislike Earl Gray and Jasmine and favor green or black tea, orange pekoe, etc. I'll drink the cheap stuff just as happily as I drink the premium stuff though.
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by Halfapint » Thu Feb 28, 2019 2:27 am

Our well water is quite amazing so I actually don’t mind drinking plain water. However I do love tea (I hate coffee, fight me!) but I’m a bit of a snob. I love oolong loose leaf tea. The issue with loose leaf is it has to be stored very well or it can go bad.

The gf just quit her coffee habit in favor of tea. While I don’t like how she drinks it, the tea itself is decent, and she buys in bulk. So we currently have 4000+ tea packets and 1000 packets of tea with creamer, sitting here. They are all stored in plastic tbswoyh 100 or so packets. So tea is on the menu for the apocalypse. Plus she bought 2 cases of some shitty coffee creamer to drink with it. So if we want to really butcher our tea, I can dump some of that crap in it.
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by JayceSlayn » Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:43 am

I'm a daily coffee drinker, but I have a good stock of tea at home, and I take tea with me on camping trips because it packs easier than coffee and associated paraphernalia. Both are relatively inexpensive ways to get your daily dose of caffeine, and also to just provide a nice warm drink, which occasionally makes a wonder of a difference for morale.

I'm not particularly sensitive to the taste of water, but I do agree that boiled water tastes strangely flat sometimes. Non-boiling, non-chemical methods of water purification (I think that leaves basically UV and physical filtration/adsorption) don't usually seem to alter the taste of water though. I love the Sawyer filtration systems. While they don't filter chemical contaminants without some additional activated carbon step afterwards, I am comfortable using them on all kinds of water sources which can be considered relatively free from non-biological contaminants, like collected rainwater, non-urban streams, etc. Notably, boiling has the same limitation with most chemical contaminants, unless you are setting up a distillation apparatus as well.

Another thing that boiling water for purification has against it is the extreme amount of energy it requires. Even if you don't have to carry or stockpile your fuel for boiling, it is still a time-consuming and wasteful step. Think how much heating it takes to sanitize 100 gallons of water, and then consider how much energy (effort) it takes to purify the same amount through a good physical filter. Unless it is winter and maybe the heating comes as a side effect of keeping you warm - other times it is likely extra heat that isn't otherwise needed.
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by raptor » Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:10 pm

A few things.

Boiled water will taste flat due to the oxygen being released during boiling. If you simply pour it few times between 2 containers it will improve the flat taste.

Tea is a great prep item as is coffee. I say that because you boil water for both thus if done properly you can be sure that most organics in the water (not prions,but most viruses and bacteria) are dead. So in a SHTF situation boiled water will always be safer.

Boiling water to purify it is energy intensive. However if you make tea your can boil a kettle of water but use only a small portion by making tea one cup or glass at a time. Thus you can retain the boiled and clean water for other potable water uses. There is thus no need to boil vast quantities of water unless you need to do so for other purposes.

Final point note the use of the word "safer". Boiling water will not remove heavy metals, pesticides, arsenic, salt, spores,prions and a wide variety of things. You will need a filter and/or chemicals (iodine or chlorine) to effectively deal with some of these items. Depending upon the contaminate a filter may be your only choice.

That said if you filter your water and then boil it for tea or coffee you should be in great shape. I like r and prefer it over most beverages except coffee. Stil especially when working in the heat water does boring. Iced tea is a great way to vary the flavor.

I also believe that tea kept dry does not go bad and basically has an indeterminate shelf life. On a separate note I planted several camellia sinensis that are used for tea leaf production.They are readily available and as long as the climate is suitable you can have a ready supply of tea on hand.

So yes count me in for some tea.

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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by doitnstyle1 » Sat Mar 02, 2019 1:56 am

Thanks Raptor. Always enjoy your input. I know that someone mentioned distilling water. I would like to mention that distilling is VERY energy intensive and still only makes water safer. Chemically contaminated water will still have volatiles that can evaporate and condensate with the distilled water. A number of collameters would be required to really purify water free of contaminates along with an activated charcoal prefilter.

Too expensive unless you somehow build it yourself. I'm sure it can be done, but...

I've been thinking about building a home distillery for water purification but probably not until I get my homestead up and running.
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by raptor » Sat Mar 02, 2019 4:54 pm

BTW there are several threads in the Hall of Fame that have great information on water filtration.
There are several article dealing with building a water filters.
http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 4d1abfe970

Boiling water is energy intensive but nothing compared to distilling it. That said if you limit this activity to simply your drinking/cooking water you can reduce substantially the energy required. You can also reuse cooking water sometimes. Think boiling veggees and pasta. The water can be reused for other cooking needs.

Now for filtration purposes a lot depends on the contaminate in the water. It should be noted that even a simple tap mounted filter will remove many contaminates. Obviously others do require other approaches and in some cases multiple methods.

You need to look at the label of the water filter to find its NSF certification. If it is NSF 42 certified it is really just a taste filter that removes chlorine and sulfates (egg water) however many of the cheap faucet filters are certified NSF International against ANSI Standard 42 and 53. The NSF 53 certification will state exactly what it is certified to filter. This one for instance is certified to filter down to acceptable EPA limits lead, lindane and atrazine (as well as chlorine, sulfates and particles down 0.5 to < 1 micron in size) from 200 gallons of water. Note after 200 gallons it should be discarded.

https://smile.amazon.com/Culligan-FM-15 ... PJQDMJQA1B

A link to the NSF water filter certification page.
http://www.nsf.org/consumer-resources/w ... aims-guide

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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by NT2C » Sat Mar 02, 2019 7:46 pm

Something to remember, if your refrigerator has in-door chilled water and/or ice it probably uses a cartridge filter that's at least NSF 42 rated, and may even be NSF 53 rated. The one on our fridge is particularly good and is what we used for cooking water when our area was under a "boil water" alert a few months back due to a broken main. Clean, well filtered water may be as close as your fridge in an emergency, if you keep up with filter replacements.

Note: that indicator light on your fridge is just triggered by how many times you open and close the door in most cases, not the actual filter condition
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doitnstyle1
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Re: Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink

Post by doitnstyle1 » Sun Mar 17, 2019 12:43 am

I just found this on YouTube:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Icon-LifeSav ... _sQAvD_BwE

They apparently have a Jerry can version too.
"All religious stuff aside, the fact is people who can't kill will always be subject to those who can." - Brad "Iceman" Colbert, Generation Kill

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