Gunny's First Aid Kit **It is Reborn! Page 4&5 (Pics)**

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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Gunny
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Post by Gunny » Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:51 am

Sigh, I heart you guys, thanks again for the info.

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Post by jamoni » Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:55 am

You'll really enjoy it. Getting my EMT-B is on my long list of things to do.
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Gunny
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Post by Gunny » Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:00 pm

Alright:

I finally got away from my tri-fold medical kit. While the bag looks good, the middle fold (last in the trifecta) kept falling out. The bag was made of thin material as well, which made me want to switch over to my Kifaru Foldout system all the more.

This system is the Kifaru Foldout system with various internal dock and lock pouches. This system and pouches can be found at www.kifaru.net

Alright, on to the photos.

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Pack closed, front.

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Pack closed back with single strip of PALS webbing.

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Top-down view

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Opened fully

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Opened fully, top-down view

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Left-side closeup

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Right Side Closeup

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Top-down view, zippers open.

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Right side zippers open

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Left side open

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Center pouches opened.

Lastly, here's two closeups of how the pockets are attached to the blank pals webbing.

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***

All in all, I love this system. It's slick on the outside, which makes it quick and easy to drop into my Kifaru EMR. The zippers are made out of #10 zippers and paracord pulls, which makes them nearly bombproof.

Thoughts, comments, questions?

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Post by Brash » Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:26 pm

Thats a sexy bag. And no I don't feel wierd for saying that. :)
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Post by Jeriah » Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:39 pm

Those are Lock and Load pockets? #1 and #6?
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Gunny
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Post by Gunny » Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:40 pm

Lock and Load, I think I screwed up and called then 'dock and lock'

Jeriah, I'll post here when I get the exact pouches. I'm not sure of the numbers anymore.

Brash: Cheers mate.

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Post by Gunny » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:09 pm

Quick reply to keep everyone updated:

I picked up:

1 (one) 150 (one hundred, fifty) count of Aleve pills that's surprisingly small. This fits well in my medical kit's pill pouch.

1 (one) 12 (twelve) count pack of Immodium AD. I didn't realize I had used most of mine up on camping buddies over the past year.

1 (one) 80 (eighty) count of Mens-One Source vitamins, specifically for the medical kit.

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Post by Eisenbart » Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:36 pm

Ascherman seal,great idea!
Will get some tomorrow!
Morituri te salutant!
Eisenbart.

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Post by Salty » Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:33 pm

Gunny,
I have a lot of experience in pre-hospital medicine. Its my career. 6 years as a Paramedic in New York and 4 years for the Anchorage Fire Department as a FireFighter / Paramedic. I teach EMT I, II, III, Paramedic Trained Boston DMAT in tactical / wilderness medicine along with the Turkish Mountain Rescue Team. Additionally, I spend one month a year participating on a patrol and rescue team for the National Park Service on Denali.
I would be interested in answering some of your questions if your interested.
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Gunny
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Post by Gunny » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:19 pm

Salty:

Can you get me either a Military ACS or the NSN? I can't find either :(

Also, what is a good civilian legal injectible pain killer that would be suitible for a kit like mine?

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Post by Salty » Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:14 am

Abbreviations are killing me.
ACS - Adavanced Clotting Sponge I assume.
http://www.z-medica.com/

Your going to have to help me with the NSN. I know this as 'National Stock Number'.

Toradol is a non narcotic Injectible analgesic. It is a potent NSAID (non steroidal anti inflammatory drug) like ASA or Ibuprofin.

It is really the only thing going for a non narcotic injectables. This stuff works awesome. Probably more powerful than Morphine without the euphoria. I carry it on Denali.
It is super tough on the kidney though. It requires a physician prescription which means pills from the pharm. Find a Nurse, hook up with her and get your drugs that way. Thats my suggestion.
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Gunny
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Post by Gunny » Thu Sep 28, 2006 6:12 am

Sorry was referring to the Achserman chest seal rather than the clotting sponge :)

They were supposed to come out with a new military version that sticks better than the currently fielded model.

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Post by jetsiphon » Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:38 am

Looks good. A lot smaller than mine, which isn't really a bad thing.

I just found out that I let my EMT lapse. Oh well. Since I'm not on the FD anymore it really doesn't matter.

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Post by Salty » Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:02 pm

The chest seal you speak of, well I used it once and will never use one again. It caused more problems it solved. Plus the size and cost isn't worth it in the rare opportunity you need. The flutter valve, which I saw a photo of earlier in the post, is superior to anything but two things. The thing a lot of people don't realize with sucking chest wounds is that they are wet and gooey. So it is hard to seal with the flutter concept.
SO, this is how I manage them. Seal it completely (I like defib pads, but duct tape would work) and then burp it as needed.

At a critical care level, a chest tube is the real solution to the problem. Chest tubes are big and expensive. So a simple chest needle is good. 14 ga Catheter with a stop cock. Seal the sucking chest wound and then prophalactically needle the chest. Carry two needles as the chances of one clogging over time is high.
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Another option....

Post by Arclight » Sun Oct 01, 2006 9:32 pm

Awesome job, Gunny et al. That's an impressive kit and good advice/descriptions. Since this is an area of interest to me, my 2c.

<b>First, kit: </b>
Everyone has to consider what *they* want in a kit. One man's perfect kit is not necessarily right for the next guy. As an EMT who often has had to carry all my equipment (vs. having an ambulance, etc.), my kit of choice for basic care comes from Conterra. While they make a variety of specialized rescue-oriented medical kit gear, their Aid Belts are well-designed, sturdy kits for carrying much of what you'd need for "most cases."

I have a full basic assessment and wound care kit in the Patrol III, which has proven to be comfortable for long wear, and attachable to a full size BoB as required. Perhaps not as fancy and hardcore as Gunny's kit, but very practical and multipurpose.
<img src="http://www.conterra-inc.com/contents/im ... s/pfp3.jpg&">

<b>Patient care:</b>
As far as performing lots of exotic techniques, I tend to recommend butterfly closures over suturing for all but the best trained folks. Lots of good wound cleaning is key if you are talking about long term maintenance of an injured person. I keep a good stock of Purell in my kits for general hygeine.

For anyone interested in using said kits, but unable/unwilling to invest in a full EMT/EMT+ training program, First Responder will buy you a lot of time in these scenarios. Consider that as an alternative.
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Post by Tac Medic » Sun Oct 01, 2006 9:38 pm

Your right Arc. You should also throw in some Benzoin with those butterflys. They make them stick ten times better...........

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Post by Salty » Tue Oct 03, 2006 3:53 am

Steri strips, or what not is what I prefer over sutures. I have had lots of opportunities to practice suturing. My girlfriends father is an oral surgeon and he lets me suture from time to time. I think it is a great skill to help a friend who has no health insurance or to prepare for life after health care. But, in the wilderness setting, I think sutures are setting you up for trouble. These wounds tend towards infection after you create additional injury from suturing and creating a nice, well protected, dark, warm, moist pocket for bacterial growth. It will for sure have to be reopened for cleaning and the steristrip with benzoin allows for non traumatic access to re-debride a wound.
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Post by Burncycle » Wed Oct 04, 2006 11:48 pm

Would it be worth it to invest in a couple of NPAs? I have an M3 bag and it came with only one oral.

Although it's kind of a taboo subject, at least one decent tourniquet might be worth having on hand.

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Post by Tac Medic » Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:12 pm

Depends........if your making a trauma kit, then the TQ's and NPA's should be in there. If your making a first aid kit. Then maybe not. It's up to your particular needs. Tourniquets are not taboo. They have saved many lives in the GWOT. Check out the TQ at www.realfighting.com. I designed it with a Wilderness medic/Arborist buddy. It's called the "Q" Tourniquet......or you can check out the MAT, or CAT or a buncha others. Again, it's up to your personal preference. There are currently three main styles of TQ. Windlass, Pneumatic, and ratchet...............if you want more info, you can PM me.

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Post by Salty » Mon Oct 09, 2006 3:55 am

I agree with Tac Medic. Tourniquets in basic educational literature is taboo, but in the real world are super valuable. I have said to my paramedic students over the years that I have never had a hemorrhage that I couldn't stop with direct pressure, elevation and pressure points. But the reality is that I have had two patients in my 10 year career where I had to improvise a tourniquet.
My method is a Blood pressure cuff. I measure a BP and then apply it to the extremity of concern. I pump it up to 10 mmHg below the systolic BP to stop or slow the bleed. Works awesome and it gives some free hands to operate the radio, O2, IV's, etc. It also allows for some distal perfusion.
NPA's are awesome. The reality is that if someone is so sick or injured that they can tolerate an OPA, then they are too far gone towards affective management without more advance tools. However the NPA can temporize an airway in those who have a fighting chance in long term pre-hospital management scenarios where critical care interventions are not available.
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Post by BoltAction » Sat Oct 21, 2006 4:05 pm

You went modular, great idea!

The kit has come a long way; really great job!
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Post by The Ron » Sat Oct 21, 2006 9:53 pm

NPAs??
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Post by Tac Medic » Sun Oct 22, 2006 7:51 am

Nasopharyngeal airways...............flexible tubes that are inserted into the nasopharynx to keep the airway open and aid in ventilation.

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Post by jetsiphon » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:31 pm

Salty wrote:
Toradol is a non narcotic Injectible analgesic. It is a potent NSAID (non steroidal anti inflammatory drug) like ASA or Ibuprofin.

It is really the only thing going for a non narcotic injectables. This stuff works awesome. Probably more powerful than Morphine without the euphoria. I carry it on Denali.
It is super tough on the kidney though. It requires a physician prescription which means pills from the pharm. Find a Nurse, hook up with her and get your drugs that way. Thats my suggestion.
Yeah, just don't use it for more than 5 days, or you'll have a good little GI bleed to deal with. Not to mention, in order to get any, you must have a note from the Dr. sayin' you've already had a dose.

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