Monoject Needles ("Kitty Harpoons") - Human first-aid use?

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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Hex7f7f7f
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Monoject Needles ("Kitty Harpoons") - Human first-aid use?

Post by Hex7f7f7f » Sun May 01, 2011 2:35 pm

A little while back I had a cat who required subcutaneous fluids on a regular basis. Unfortunately the cat ended up passing and I'm left with about 50 of these Monoject 18x1A needles.

My ignorance of medical supplies is vast :)
Are these of any use for human medical aid? I'm just trying to figure out what to do with these... if it's worth keeping them for a just-in-case scenario or maybe just contact my old vet and see if they can use them for something...

Thanks!

rat-a-tat-tat
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Re: Monoject Needles ("Kitty Harpoons") - Human first-aid us

Post by rat-a-tat-tat » Sun May 01, 2011 5:41 pm

A lot of private companies that use medics but have limited funding (or military medics with a shitty 4 shed) often DO stock up on vet supplies, as they usually cost less. A needle is a needle. A bandage is a bandage. Tape is tape.

However, if you aren't qualified to be using needles on other humans, don't.

Hex7f7f7f
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Re: Monoject Needles ("Kitty Harpoons") - Human first-aid us

Post by Hex7f7f7f » Sun May 01, 2011 5:56 pm

rat-a-tat-tat wrote:However, if you aren't qualified to be using needles on other humans, don't.
I definitely won't :) I'll keep them around in case someone who is qualified needs them.

rat-a-tat-tat
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Re: Monoject Needles ("Kitty Harpoons") - Human first-aid us

Post by rat-a-tat-tat » Sun May 01, 2011 6:54 pm

Hex7f7f7f wrote:
rat-a-tat-tat wrote:However, if you aren't qualified to be using needles on other humans, don't.
I definitely won't :) I'll keep them around in case someone who is qualified needs them.
Even so, this can be a dangerous proposition.
If someone gets into your kit having seen a few episodes of House, ER, Trauma, etc. and thinking they know the score, that could turn out very poorly..
If you're found in possession of a bunch of needles by LEOs, be prepared to be answering some hard questions for a while, possibly face a fine, and a 99% chance of having your needles confiscated.

I recently inherited a relatively well stocked medic bag from my stepdad and one of the first things I did was throw away all of the sharps, as I have no real use for them.
Being prepared is great, but do proceed with caution. When it comes to med kit and weapons, the potential to do much more harm than good by use in untrained/unqualified hands is very real.

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