My Ricky Rescue Bag

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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wild_weasel
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Wed Jun 16, 2010 10:58 pm

Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by claren » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:00 pm

This one should do fine:

http://www.rescue-essentials.com/Adsafe ... 0-0170.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Veritas » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:02 pm

claren wrote:I think we can all agree that certain things have no place in care-under-fire / TCCC type conditions. However...
alwayswandering wrote:I see little use for pulse oximetry when I'm on a stocked BLS/ALS unit, frankly
Are you kidding me ? Have you ever taken care of a pediatric respiratory/ALTE patient ? Or a COPDer ? Despite what you said later on in this thread, the answer to everything "respiratory" is not always 15L NRB.
........
And while we're on the topic of space, I kind of assumed that the OP was talking about getting one of those finger-tip saturation meters. Aren't those what the military issues ?
Doesn't matter. Kids and guys with COPD aren't in Afghanistan or Iraq. This thread is only about soldiers. Soldiers without diseases.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:19 pm

claren wrote:I think we can all agree that certain things have no place in care-under-fire / TCCC type conditions. However...

Are you kidding me ? Have you ever taken care of a pediatric respiratory/ALTE patient ? Or a COPDer ? Despite what you said later on in this thread, the answer to everything "respiratory" is not always 15L NRB.
I sure have. If people are in "bad respiratory distress" (i.e. two to three word apnea, "I can't breath"), they need specific drugs (steroids) and oxygen. A glance at a COPD'er can give you a rough idea of how bad they are and if they're improving. Elderly patients, i.e. most COPD'ers, aren't ideal candidates for pulse oximetry anyway due to diminished peripheral perfusion. Again, I'm not saying pulse ox isn't useful in some situations, but surely not in a combat situation and, even in a BLS unit, only moderatly so.

I was BLS, medic riding along and a paramedic student taking "care" of the patient. The student obviously was flubbering all around so the medic took over and told the student to keep an eye on the pulse ox. The student is a professional firefighter and EMT-b, has been for years, but he sat there staring at the SpO2 as if it were about to catch fire and he kept saying "Ninety four... ninety six... ninety three... NINETY... NINETY FOUR... ONE HUNDRED.... NINETY NINE". Over dependance on gadgets. I could tell by looking at this elderly lady that she was CTD, she'd been intubated three times before in her life and needed RAPID care. Did the magic of pulse ox (on a ninety three year old patient) give me this brilliant insight? No. Her presentation told me that.
I don't see what you mean by this. What is the lifepack going to tell you that the Sp02 is not ? ETCO2 ?
In our system, resp distress calls are ALS. If someone is in respiratory distress, the medic and all of his accoutrement will be on hand.
This is a false dichotomy, because a pocket mask takes up about as much room as an Israeli dressing and allows you to provide a much better seal, and the mouth-mask seal is what matters with BLS ventilation. No reason not to carry one. Also, I personally know lots of soldiers (and young men in general) that love tattoos and having unprotected sex, both of which wonderful vectors. I'd rather be a life-saving hero that does -Not- have Hep C, personally.
OK, a CPR mask might not be such a bad idea, especially given the weight/"save" ratio.

WW- As for burn gels and the like, every trauma center I've ever worked with (UMD Shock Trauma, R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma, Johns Hopkins Bayview, Hershey, Penn State, etc) has insisted that burn patients be delivered "dry", no gel, no water, just dry sterile dressings. Your specific protocols may vary, but ask and find out to be sure.

If I sound like a dick, so sorry. My main thing here is "Training > Gear", and that's for everything from firearms to medical equipment.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:19 pm

Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:20 pm

wild_weasel wrote:NOTE: Since we have a ton of the J&J first aid kits scattered around the shop areas I see little need for adding booboo supplies. Other than a small ziplock bag with a few assorted plasters, ibuprofen, and something like Camelbak Elixir for dehydration.

Cheers,
W-W
Out of personal curiosity, which contractor will you be working for and in what capacity? If you'd like to be very broad in your answers, I understand and it's no worries.

aw

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Sckitzo » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:42 pm

Veritas wrote:
claren wrote:I think we can all agree that certain things have no place in care-under-fire / TCCC type conditions. However...
alwayswandering wrote:I see little use for pulse oximetry when I'm on a stocked BLS/ALS unit, frankly
Are you kidding me ? Have you ever taken care of a pediatric respiratory/ALTE patient ? Or a COPDer ? Despite what you said later on in this thread, the answer to everything "respiratory" is not always 15L NRB.
........
And while we're on the topic of space, I kind of assumed that the OP was talking about getting one of those finger-tip saturation meters. Aren't those what the military issues ?
Doesn't matter. Kids and guys with COPD aren't in Afghanistan or Iraq. This thread is only about soldiers. Soldiers without diseases.
But there are civilians here, tons of them. From contractors to Local National workers. I see more people without guns then I do with guns. They do not have the same PT standards that any of the branches do, and in the case of LN and TCN's they only get blood work so often.

I also see fat ass Soldiers/Airman/Sailors (only ever seen "chunky" Marines) so the sterotype that everyone here is in "good" health is pretty damn misleading. Maybe better then most of the "civilian" world, but I wouldn't say by that great of a margin. Even those of us in good shape might not be clean, if one of my buddies went down would I do no mask CPR? Yes, in heart beat, but if I have time I will at least put on gloves. If I watched a LN go down for whatever reason, you can damn well bet I'm going to take the extra seconds to don BSI.

WW isn't on a firebase where its 90% combat troops, he's in a base the size of a small city.

I keep a CPR mask in my bag, as well as gloves. I also keep the Steth I got and BP cuff as honestly, I had no where else to put em. No pulse ox though, if I was given one sure, but I have other shit to spend money on that the kit actually needs.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by K9medic » Thu Jun 17, 2010 5:14 pm

May be things have changed since I was in the “green machine” but as the Colour Sgt always told us as we got leave “draw condoms as you pass the Med Centre because you lot will stick it wear I won’t put my pace stick”.

If I saw a squaddy that needed CPR I would defiantly use a face mask if I had one. If it was one of my mates? Well we were probably in the same club last night anyway.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Thu Jun 17, 2010 5:56 pm

I wasn't aware that the OP was in a "non-combat, combat" area (as my father says). That case, having some basic diagnostic tools might be beneficial but, even still, I'd opine that they aren't. Here's why;

When I'm dealing with a trauma or a medical patient, odds are good that they're going to go to a doctor (or die, or both). My main decision isn't "what can I do on scene to save them", it's "what type of medical facility do they need?". If a trauma patient is hypotensive, I'll know they are in late stage shock, their bodies aren't compensating and they need rapid transport (in my area read: fly-out) to a surgeon . I'm not sure what the capabilities are of hospitals in Afghanistan, so I can't really comment here.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Sckitzo » Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:53 pm

Battle Trauma still is likely where he is at, but so is the PT having a heart attack since he's been here for 6 years and doesn't skimp on the ice cream.

Its weird, a mishmash of TCC and "normal" medical calls (from what I hear and see, not a medic) and a mishmash of peoples general level of health.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:17 pm

Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by guy1138 » Tue Jun 22, 2010 2:14 am

wild_weasel wrote:...there have also been a couple contractors that have gone down with heart attacks here, all good reasons to be up to date on AHA or ARC CPR for the professional, and have a pocket mask or shield handy. There is also a coworker with controlled high blood pressure that wants me to check his BP, between scheduled doctor visits, once my steth and BP cuff arrive
This is pretty much what I was going to chime in to say... As a contractor you're probably going to see 10x as many heat injuries, chest pains, dizziness, etc than you are shrapnel wounds, multiple gunshot wounds and amputations. Plenty of out of shape contractors that might fall out for whatever reason. Also, plenty of civilian DoD employees as well. Maybe you're a contractor that does go outside the wire, but most don't, and your diagnostic tools may come in very handy given your peers.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag PHOTOS ADDED

Post by wild_weasel » Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:25 am

Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag PHOTOS ADDED

Post by Sckitzo » Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:12 am

Looks good man

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag PHOTOS ADDED

Post by VXMerlinXV » Wed Jun 30, 2010 10:50 am

Just a couple of suggested tweeks:
1) I like what you've got, the only thing I would add would be a couple of 5x9's, for where an izzy would be tough to use or overkill.
2) While the M-3 is tough to organize, I find in almost level of aid kit, keeping like items together works best. You've got tools in four different pouches; ortho, ETD's, and gloves in two. This is going to get confusing when you use the bag in a hurry.
My posts are my opinion, and do not reflect the standing or policy of any group I may be associated with. Nothing typed here should be considered medical advice, or permission from myself or any governing body to perform medical intervention. If this is a medical emergency, please get off your computer and dial the appropriate local response number.

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