My Ricky Rescue Bag

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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My Ricky Rescue Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Sun Jun 13, 2010 9:26 pm

Finally got my Ricky Rescue Bag put together.
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Surplus M-3 Bag. I see firsthand now that these bags are not much on organization.
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M-3 Bag Open
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Main Pouch: Blizzard Survival Blanket, SAM Splint, CPR Pocket Mask, 6” Elastic Bandage, Israeli Abdominal Combat Dressing, BP Cuff, HyFin Chest Seal, Asherman Chest Seal
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Pocket: Stethoscope and Quick Reference Card
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Pouch #2: Tape, x3 Triangular Dressing, x4 Nitrile Gloves, Nasal Pharyngeal Airway 28 FR, x2 14 GA Decompression Catheters, x6 Alcohol Pads, x2 Eye Shields, Trauma Shears, x2 Bite Sticks, x2 Disposable Pen Lights
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Pouch #1: x2 6” Israeli Combat Dressing, x2 CAT Tourniquets, x2 Compressed Gauze, x2 Combat Gauze, Strap Cutter, x2 Nitrile gloves


Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:54 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:03 pm

Why the steth?

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:37 pm

Cheers,
W-W
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by BobtheBreaker » Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:02 am

Wouldnt even worry about Pulse Oximetery.

Why are you getting Ashermans if you have Hyfins?
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Veritas » Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:37 am

BobtheBreaker wrote:Wouldnt even worry about Pulse Oximetery.
Yeah, especially because I don't see a bp cuff in there yet, unless I missed it. That would be a lot more useful than a pulse ox.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Mon Jun 14, 2010 2:36 am

Cheers,
W-W
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by BobtheBreaker » Mon Jun 14, 2010 3:05 am

wild_weasel wrote:
BobtheBreaker wrote:Wouldnt even worry about Pulse Oximetery.

Why are you getting Ashermans if you have Hyfins?
My thought on having both Asherman and Hyfins is that the HyFin would go on an exit wound while the Asherman would go on the entry.

Cheers,
W-W
But thats where the wrapper from the Ashermans goes :(
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:17 am

You need to focus on items you're trained to use.

A pulse oximeter? Why? Do you carry bottled oxygen? If no, what's a 80%SpO2 reading going to matter? If you're dealing with trauma, opposed to medical, I'd always give oxygen if available. I see little use for pulse oximetry when I'm on a stocked BLS/ALS unit, frankly, let alone a combat medic situation.

A steth? Perhaps auscultating chest sounds can give a indication of a hemo or pneumo but, again, have you been trained to interpret these sounds?

Gauze, tourniquet, decompression kit, gauze, gauze, gauze. Anything else? Call for a medic.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:18 am

Cheers,
W-W
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:44 am

wild_weasel wrote:I was an EMT when active duty in the USAF and have recently been through the Army’s Combat Lifesaver training and qualified to use all the components in the Combat Lifesaver Medical Equipment Set (2009) that I'm basing my kit on. However, I found the course somewhat lacking and needed a thorough EMT-B refresher anyway so enrolled in a class offered locally. The stethoscope and blood pressure were mainly needed for the EMT-B class since I hate sharing ear wax with others, so the first responder bag will make a good home for them. Even when I was active as an EMT I seldom had the opportunity to start IVs, as is my situation now and have no plans adding saline locks, etc. to my kit. I have to agree with you on not really needing the pulse/oximeter, but the gadget factor was overwhelming. I see my role as bridging the gap until the professional EMS arrives on scene and/or getting the casualty to the Casualty Collection Point (CCP).

Cheers,
W-W

Good post, I commend you for your honesty re: gadget factor. I rarely use the damn oximeter even on an ambulance. If I've the slightest assumption that the patient is having respiratory issues then I'll have a medic and their lifepack, plus I'll have them on 15lpm via NRB.

The biggest difference I see between 911 EMS and combat lifesaver; in EMS you're dealing with people of all lifestyles, all weights, all PMH and all sorts of on-board substances. When you're a combat lifesaver, you'll be dealing with young, athletic, healthy males that are required to undergo yearly physical examinations.

A steth and a bp cuff? What's the point? Would it change your treatment modalities? Most likely not. If a guy is injured enough that he's in decompensated shock and having a lower BP, the answer is "HIGHER LEVEL OF MEDICAL CARE". If he's injured and shock-y but not hypotensive, the answer is "HIGHER LEVEL OF MEDICAL CARE".

Focus on the ABC's, keep them alive until higher medical care arrives.

Airway - I like the NPA, but the OPA works better at managing the airway of an unconscious person. For the size of your syphgmomanometer you could fit in a decent set of OPA's and deal with a life-threat.

Breathing - Eh, not too much here. Maybe one of those small BVM's that I've seen tactical medical companies offer? No need for even a CPR mask, the individual is a young, healthy individual that's been tested for and inoculated against lots of microbes. A kit for a chest decompression and the knowledge to use it. Chest seals, you've got taken care of

Circulation - BIG ONE RIGHT HERE. LOTS OF GAUZE, TAPE, GAUZE, GAUZE, GAUZE, OCCLUSIVE, GAUZE GAUZE GAUZE.

If you can manage those three and keep them alive long enough for a MEDEVAC/CASEVAC, you'll be doing just fine.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Veritas » Wed Jun 16, 2010 1:19 pm

Dude, chill out....it seems like every thread gets crapped on with the whole "are you trained to do that?" argument. Sometimes it is very valid, ie dealing with meds...and sometimes it's just silly, like using a bp cuff or stethoscope. You do no harm to someone by knowing more about them, and it can only help later on to get more info.
alwayswandering wrote: A steth and a bp cuff? What's the point? Would it change your treatment modalities? Most likely not. If a guy is injured enough that he's in decompensated shock and having a lower BP, the answer is "HIGHER LEVEL OF MEDICAL CARE". If he's injured and shock-y but not hypotensive, the answer is "HIGHER LEVEL OF MEDICAL CARE".

Ok, gonna disagree there. Lots of good reasons to know somebody's blood pressure. As stated before, it could help later on. He mentioned needle decompression, I am pretty that's for a tension pneumothorax, and you would definitely want a stethoscope to try and confirm that before you go and give them a pneumothorax. That's not a "maybe, yeah, sure, okay" kind of thing, that is a "yes, you are trained, use it" kind of thing. If that was the only reason for including it, that would be sufficient.
alwayswandering wrote:Breathing - Eh, not too much here. Maybe one of those small BVM's that I've seen tactical medical companies offer? No need for even a CPR mask, the individual is a young, healthy individual that's been tested for and inoculated against lots of microbes.
WHAT?! Come on...don't argue against a CPR mask, that is ridiculous. "Let's not even pack gloves, it takes too long to put them on and they might bleed out before you can help them. That guy doesn't look infected with anything...." Good grief.
alwayswandering wrote:If you can manage those three and keep them alive long enough for a MEDEVAC/CASEVAC, you'll be doing just fine.
Again, I disagree. While your ultimate goal is to keep somebody alive until better medical care can be provided, you have many more goals than simply not letting them die, however unrealistic they may be. Plus, we are talking about prepping here, so you may not always be in a situation where definitive care is just a quick helicopter ride away.

There are a lot of reasons why you may be called you assess somebody, and not all of them include bleeding out and heart attack. The more information you have about somebody, the better you can treat them, or help someone else treat them. Having a bp cuff and stethoscope, in my opinion, are very necessary for a complete set-up. A pulse ox is not necessary. He said he was trained for all the things in the bag, so he needs a stethoscope. Try to think a little more, instead of just reacting. If he was talking about giving morphine or epinephrine, then yeah, I would argue the "scope of practice" thing. But we are talking blood pressure here, man.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 1:49 pm

Veritas wrote:Dude, chill out....it seems like every thread gets crapped on with the whole "are you trained to do that?" argument. Sometimes it is very valid, ie dealing with meds...and sometimes it's just silly, like using a bp cuff or stethoscope. You do no harm to someone by knowing more about them, and it can only help later on to get more info.


Ok, gonna disagree there. Lots of good reasons to know somebody's blood pressure. As stated before, it could help later on.
Later on, when? When the guy is in the hospital surrounded by doctors and, ideally, a surgeon? If his BP is over 80mm/Hg, he'll get operated. If not, he'll get pumped with fluids. Can you do either of those in the field? Why not bring a freakin EKG and put a 12 lead on him, so they'll have a ryhtm strip when he gets to the hospital?

What will BP show you? If the pt. is shock-y when you get to them, they're in shock. It's not due to a some internal non-traumatic leak, most likely, so the guy will end up in a hospital with surgeons either way. If they're in shock, TREAT FOR SHOCK. I'd rather have an O2 bottle and treat everyone for shock than waste time dicking around with a pulse ox and a cuff trying to see if.... yes he does have some condition I can't do anything about!
He mentioned needle decompression, I am pretty that's for a tension pneumothorax, and you would definitely want a stethoscope to try and confirm that before you go and give them a pneumothorax. That's not a "maybe, yeah, sure, okay" kind of thing, that is a "yes, you are trained, use it" kind of thing. If that was the only reason for including it, that would be sufficient.
Which I clearly said a post or two ago ;-) What are the combat lifesaver protocols for decompression? Have you tried auscultating for breath sounds under fire? I haven't, I've done it in a moving ambulance and it's been difficult sometimes. Their are other signs of a pneumo/hemo you can look for. Obviously if you're waiting to see jugular venous distention you might be waiting too long. I'll say, for now, go with the steth if you must but I'd really like to see the protocols for decompression and the standards they use before it's prescribed for the combat lifesaver.
WHAT?! Come on...don't argue against a CPR mask, that is ridiculous. "Let's not even pack gloves, it takes too long to put them on and they might bleed out before you can help them. That guy doesn't look infected with anything...." Good grief.
I've never been a combat lifesaver, but I understand the fraternity felt by members of the military. If I saw a good friend, or an American warrior, injured, I wouldn't think twice about doing mouth to mouth.

Higher degree of probability: Some American serviceman has an orally contagious, serious disease V some American serviceman will die of inadequate perfusion while I'm dicking around looking for my CPR mask.
Again, I disagree. While your ultimate goal is to keep somebody alive until better medical care can be provided, you have many more goals than simply not letting them die, however unrealistic they may be. Plus, we are talking about prepping here, so you may not always be in a situation where definitive care is just a quick helicopter ride away.
You've got a 19yo soldier with two bullet wounds to his stomach. You've managed to determine he's got a patent airway and is breathing, no other life threats.

Describe the treatment you'd apply and how knowing a SpO2 or a BP changes anything you do.

Those are DIAGNOSTIC tools, not "definitive care" tools. A Pulse Ox won't stop bleeding, neither will a BP cuff. Knowing SpO2 without having supplemental oxygen doesn't mean anything other than you've wasted time applying it and you've wasted pack space carrying that instead of what the man needs, TREATMENT TOOLS.
There are a lot of reasons why you may be called you assess somebody, and not all of them include bleeding out and heart attack. The more information you have about somebody, the better you can treat them, or help someone else treat them. Having a bp cuff and stethoscope, in my opinion, are very necessary for a complete set-up. A pulse ox is not necessary. He said he was trained for all the things in the bag, so he needs a stethoscope. Try to think a little more, instead of just reacting. If he was talking about giving morphine or epinephrine, then yeah, I would argue the "scope of practice" thing. But we are talking blood pressure here, man.
What GOOD does BP do? I mean, he could have a 12 lead and I'm sure it wouldn't HURT, but why bother.

You said a "complete set-up", for what? For an EMS provider? Sure, I can see using those tools to possibly determine the extent of injuries and ensure that the patient is taken to the right hospital. How many times do you have the option, in combat, of "Drive to the normal band-aid station or fly to the trauma center", especially when you've got a guy with bullet holes?

A lot of EMS related stuff seems to focus more on goo-gaws and toys than actual knowledge.

DOES MY PATIENT HAVE A PATENT AIRWAY? IF yes, proceed to B. If no, adjust the head and insert an OPA.

IS MY PATIENT BREATHING? If yes, proceed to C. If no, BREATH FOR THEM. No gear necessary.

DOES MY PATIENT HAVE A PULSE AND IS THEIR ANY MASSIVE, LIFE THREATING BLEEDING? If they have a pulse, yay! If they don't, boo! If you can see evidence of trauma, and they have no pulse, that's not so great. The patient most likely didn't have CHF at the same time that he got shot in the chest, the lack of pulse is due to the trauma and that's a thing that's fixed by surgeons (sometimes) or is listed as a cause of death (much more frequently). If they have a pulse and are bleeding, STOP THE BLEEDING. GAUZE, PRESSURE, TAPE, MORE GAUZE, REPEAT AS NECESSARY.

Complete a trauma assessment... any other life threats? A quick scan is all you need for this, no need for a BP, a pulse ox, a twelve lead, a D-stick or a prostate exam. If you encounter life threats, treat them with your a) Chest seal b) tourniquet or c) needle decompression.

By this point, you've either got a stable patient or you don't and you've either got a bird on the way or you don't. Knowing a complete set of vitals, having their childhood doctor and dentist on the phone and having their complete medical records on hand don't mean one damn thing here, you've done everything you can realistically do for this patient with your level of training.

What if you do use your BP cuff and he's hypotensive? How do you respond? Grab the Ka-bar and do an exploratory lap surgery? Hardly. Useless gadget in this setting.

What if he's got a low SpO2? How does that change things? Do you break out the O2 bottle and give him supplemental oxygen? Would you withhold oxygen if his SpO2 was 98% but he was just drug from a burning HMMWV and had massive trauma? Of course not. Useless gadget in this setting.

I understand the importance of trending in a "regular" EMS setting, but not in a front-life combat lifesaver situation. I mean, why not bring a backboard or two along and immobilize his spine while we're at it!

The purpose of combat life saving is to take a trauma patient, deal with any life threats and GET THEM TO A SURGEON.

I don't mean to come across as an arrogant dick here, sorry if I did. No hard feelings, just calling them as I see them. You can ruck along a whole emergency room, if you'd like, but what are YOU going to use any of that stuff for? I'd rather bring the stuff I know how to use, use it well, and get them to a doctor QUICKLY. THAT'S the thing trauma patient need, not a prolonged scene time playing with gadgets, not someone so anxious to play with their gizmos and fill out a vital signs sheet that they failed to do a trauma assessment.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 1:53 pm

Bah, I'm gonna post even more :)

In the space of one "standard" syphgmometer you could have two or three SAM splits that could be used to splint an injury, relieve pain and possibly remove pressure from the circulatory system and return perfusion to ischemic tissue. THAT'S life-saving.

In the space of one pulse ox, you could have a whole metric shit ton of bandages that would STOP a severe bleed. Also, life saving.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Sckitzo » Wed Jun 16, 2010 1:57 pm

His steth and BP Cuff is for the class he's taking, depending on where he does his clinicals they may make him use his own. I didn't but thats because the instructor refused to go to Craig Hospital for the clinicals :lol:

Kit looks good man.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by KMAC179 » Wed Jun 16, 2010 4:19 pm

A BP Cuff and scope have little, if any practical application in a combat situation. always wondering made some excellent points. I will add the following, however.

The BP cuff can be used as another pressure dressing. The docs in the rear dont care what his BP was in the field, and with the equipment and training you have the pt's bp will not alter your treatment of the pt.

The scope....

In a combat scenario, you will not be checking breath sounds with a scope. This is a combat lifesaver-type bag, so it should follow the TC3 guidelines. When it comes to breathing, more specifically a Tensio Pnemuo, you will not be assessing that in phase 1 of TC3 (point of wounding, active engagement), you will begin to assess it in phase 2, Tactical Field care, which is done under solid cover away from the engagement. A trained provider will be able to tell if the pt. has a tension pnemuo without listening for breath sounds, remember this is not conventional med., and we do not use conventional techniques. If the guy has some obvious torso trauma and resp. distress, with no other obvious injuries, he probably has one. There are few reasons that a soldier will have trouble breathing when injured. It will either be an upper airway issue, IE blocked airway, or a lower airway issue, either a sucking chest wound or a pnemuo. And again, a trained provider that has seen this before will know what it looks like, and we do not teach in the military to confirm with breath sounds. If you want to, go right ahead, but when I move my pt. to a safe area a little ways from an engagement, i might not be deafened by small arms fire, but those 105's raining down on the field a 1/4 mile from me will make it pretty damn hard to hear anything, or that incoming pavelow, or the incoming medevac. Using a scope in active combat is pretty much useless.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by Veritas » Wed Jun 16, 2010 4:39 pm

I should never have entered this thread. I thought it was perhaps something that could one day evolve from simply keeping somebody alive in Afghanistan. I didn't realize it had only one purpose, my bad. All the following is apparently outside the scope of this particular set-up. I apologize for offending anyone by suggesting they might actually be capable of using their bag for more than bandage application and airway insertion. WIth that said, I am going to post it all anyway, in case the OP decides to one day make a more comprehensive kit and not just a CLS bag. He mentioned getting more classes, going for an EMT-B, etc. and I think it's a great idea to get more training, who knows what he will end up with. Anyway....

alwayswandering, this is why I try not to post in threads with any of the following words in them: "combat" "tactical" "first responder" "ems" etc. You get the picture. It's always the same thing: don't do anything except put gauze on the guy because the only thing you could ever possibly deal with is a multiple gun shot wound, so ignore everything else. Scope of practice. Not a hospital. Gun shots. War. HSLD.

I like to give my opinion, which is to keep a comprehensive kit, not just something that is good for keeping somebody alive until you get to the hospital. Since this is a prepping website, I like to discuss options outside of the normal, everyday occurrence. You obviously feel like a CLS is always a CLS and never anything more than a CLS. I disagree, and think that people should seek out more knowledge. If they have that knowledge, they should also have the tools to use it. I have no problem with somebody acquiring equipment that might come in handy later. That's why I suggested bp cuff and not pulse ox.

You mention bringing along a whole hospital and an EKG. That's not far from some of the kits on here. Also, I think it would be a great prep to have an AED, which is along the lines of an EKG. If you look around here, people are planning on being their own doctors. I hope you never find the antibiotic threads if this whole bp cuff thing has got you flustered. Talk about scope of practice...

I said SpO2 is not useful, don't know why you think I didn't. I also saw the post were you shrugged off checking for breath sounds as "perhaps" a good reason for a stethoscope, I was saying it is "definitely" a good reason for a stethoscope. Thank you for the ABC lesson, but once again, in the real world, outside of EMS and CLS and ALS and whatever else you are a part of, you might not be dealing with an emergency. You might want some information like bp, or listening for wheezing or rhonchi, or rales, or whatever. Once gain, I now know that this is not the case, that this set-up is for use in combat, hence the name. Carry on.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by BobtheBreaker » Wed Jun 16, 2010 5:22 pm

alwayswandering wrote: In the space of one "standard" syphgmometer you could have two or three SAM splits that could be used to splint an injury, relieve pain and possibly remove pressure from the circulatory system and return perfusion to ischemic tissue. THAT'S life-saving.
yes, conversely he can place that standard syphgmometer 2-4" proximate someone's bloody stump and crank it to about 200mmHg...which would also be life-saving.

And he wouldn't have to worry about not having syphgmometer for class...and when he is sitting around bored he can take peoples blood pressure for practice.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 5:36 pm

BobtheBreaker wrote:
alwayswandering wrote: In the space of one "standard" syphgmometer you could have two or three SAM splits that could be used to splint an injury, relieve pain and possibly remove pressure from the circulatory system and return perfusion to ischemic tissue. THAT'S life-saving.
yes, conversely he can place that standard syphgmometer 2-4" proximate someone's bloody stump and crank it to about 200mmHg...which would also be life-saving.

And he wouldn't have to worry about not having syphgmometer for class...and when he is sitting around bored he can take peoples blood pressure for practice.
Valid points all around. A BP cuff, in my limited experience, isn't that effective as a tourniquet and IIRC the OP said he was bringing a tourniquet.

As I said I'm not trying to be a dick or be rude, anything I'm saying is from tactical medicine, PHTLS and EMT-b curriculum.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 5:52 pm

I'm not sure why you're so dramatic here man, were all friends here and have the same goals.

Tactical/combat medicine is a unique animal and has unique traits and protocols.

For example, the AED is worthless in almost all true trauma situations. V fib doesn't occur as a result of cardiac trauma, so it wouldn't fix anything. Pulseless, apneic trauma patients are, for the most part,totally and really dead.

If the OP wants to be a b, a medic or a brain surgeon after he gets back, that's great. First priority? Getting back alive. An AED, a 12 lead, a life pac... none of those will, in his hands, keep him or any other warfighter alive.m

Don't feel that I'm discounting your opinion and don't feel that you should censor yourself here. We're all here to learn.

Veritas wrote:I should never have entered this thread. I thought it was perhaps something that could one day evolve from simply keeping somebody alive in Afghanistan. I didn't realize it had only one purpose, my bad. All the following is apparently outside the scope of this particular set-up. I apologize for offending anyone by suggesting they might actually be capable of using their bag for more than bandage application and airway insertion. WIth that said, I am going to post it all anyway, in case the OP decides to one day make a more comprehensive kit and not just a CLS bag. He mentioned getting more classes, going for an EMT-B, etc. and I think it's a great idea to get more training, who knows what he will end up with. Anyway....

alwayswandering, this is why I try not to post in threads with any of the following words in them: "combat" "tactical" "first responder" "ems" etc. You get the picture. It's always the same thing: don't do anything except put gauze on the guy because the only thing you could ever possibly deal with is a multiple gun shot wound, so ignore everything else. Scope of practice. Not a hospital. Gun shots. War. HSLD.

I like to give my opinion, which is to keep a comprehensive kit, not just something that is good for keeping somebody alive until you get to the hospital. Since this is a prepping website, I like to discuss options outside of the normal, everyday occurrence. You obviously feel like a CLS is always a CLS and never anything more than a CLS. I disagree, and think that people should seek out more knowledge. If they have that knowledge, they should also have the tools to use it. I have no problem with somebody acquiring equipment that might come in handy later. That's why I suggested bp cuff and not pulse ox.

You mention bringing along a whole hospital and an EKG. That's not far from some of the kits on here. Also, I think it would be a great prep to have an AED, which is along the lines of an EKG. If you look around here, people are planning on being their own doctors. I hope you never find the antibiotic threads if this whole bp cuff thing has got you flustered. Talk about scope of practice...

I said SpO2 is not useful, don't know why you think I didn't. I also saw the post were you shrugged off checking for breath sounds as "perhaps" a good reason for a stethoscope, I was saying it is "definitely" a good reason for a stethoscope. Thank you for the ABC lesson, but once again, in the real world, outside of EMS and CLS and ALS and whatever else you are a part of, you might not be dealing with an emergency. You might want some information like bp, or listening for wheezing or rhonchi, or rales, or whatever. Once gain, I now know that this is not the case, that this set-up is for use in combat, hence the name. Carry on.

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AZMedic
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by AZMedic » Wed Jun 16, 2010 7:09 pm

Welcome to the first aid forum!!!!
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I am a Paramedic.
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Rush2112 wrote:
the_alias wrote:
AZMedic wrote:'86 damn almost missed this cutoff. I remember baywatch ya then I became a lifeguard and was like wtf this isn't the same......
I honestly thought you were around 45 + :lol:
He's crotchety enough.

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by alwayswandering » Wed Jun 16, 2010 9:42 pm

Addendum. Commotio cordis is a v fib producing occurence brought on by trauma. An aed would be definitive care, then. Sorry to have forgotten it

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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by wild_weasel » Wed Jun 16, 2010 9:52 pm

Cheers,
W-W
Last edited by wild_weasel on Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by AZMedic » Wed Jun 16, 2010 9:57 pm

I no likely the premade water burn dressings. They take up a lot of room. I just buy the bottle of the shit and pour it on to the right size of the wound and use burn sheets.

You can get a keychain CPR mask that cost a buck and takes up less room than gloves..looks like a condom.
Take Action.
I am a Paramedic.
ZS Arizona Chapter 18: Officer

Front Offensive Line of SpamWar 6/10:Axis of Oxycontin8878 I was a warrior.
Rush2112 wrote:
the_alias wrote:
AZMedic wrote:'86 damn almost missed this cutoff. I remember baywatch ya then I became a lifeguard and was like wtf this isn't the same......
I honestly thought you were around 45 + :lol:
He's crotchety enough.

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claren
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Re: Combat Lifesaver / First Responeder Bag

Post by claren » Wed Jun 16, 2010 10:37 pm

I think we can all agree that certain things have no place in care-under-fire / TCCC type conditions. However...
alwayswandering wrote:I see little use for pulse oximetry when I'm on a stocked BLS/ALS unit, frankly
Are you kidding me ? Have you ever taken care of a pediatric respiratory/ALTE patient ? Or a COPDer ? Despite what you said later on in this thread, the answer to everything "respiratory" is not always 15L NRB.

alwayswandering wrote:If I've the slightest assumption that the patient is having respiratory issues then I'll have a medic and their lifepack
I don't see what you mean by this. What is the lifepack going to tell you that the Sp02 is not ? ETCO2 ?

alwayswandering wrote: I've never been a combat lifesaver, but I understand the fraternity felt by members of the military. If I saw a good friend, or an American warrior, injured, I wouldn't think twice about doing mouth to mouth.
Higher degree of probability: Some American serviceman has an orally contagious, serious disease V some American serviceman will die of inadequate perfusion while I'm dicking around looking for my CPR mask.
This is a false dichotomy, because a pocket mask takes up about as much room as an Israeli dressing and allows you to provide a much better seal, and the mouth-mask seal is what matters with BLS ventilation. No reason not to carry one. Also, I personally know lots of soldiers (and young men in general) that love tattoos and having unprotected sex, both of which wonderful vectors. I'd rather be a life-saving hero that does -Not- have Hep C, personally.

And while we're on the topic of space, I kind of assumed that the OP was talking about getting one of those finger-tip saturation meters. Aren't those what the military issues ?
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