Question about quick clot

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Question about quick clot

Post by Blackout » Mon Jun 22, 2009 9:56 am

I tried searching google and using the search feature here but I couldn't find any answers. If this has been asked before please lock.

So, when you use quick clot, and pour that powdery stuff in your wound and stop the bleed does that powdery substance absorb into the wound or do you have to wash it out later?

Sorry if this is a dumb question. I don't know anything about how it works and if someone can point me in the direction of a thread that talks about it in detail please link me.

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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by JIM » Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:57 am

Yes, if you use a hemostatic agent it needs to be washed out wit saline or water prior to final wound-care in the ER.
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by throwback » Mon Jun 22, 2009 11:31 am

It hasn't been discussed much. Here is a link to the demo video the company put out years ago to try to convince everyone to buy their product. It was shown to pretty much every medic when they did their training down in San Antonio.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WmxV6B9hUU" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Note how they make a point of how easily the excess compound is rinsed out afterward. That is because some poor surgeon is going to have to go digging around in the wound cavity and try to reconnect the severed artery, and having a big pile of hemostatic in the wound makes that harder. Also, while it looks like this is the coolest substance ever in the video, real injuries are never so accessible and neat, nor do you have suction handy to keep the blood level manageable. As you may be able to tell, I'm a bit of a skeptic about hemostatics. Some folks really like 'em though. As always, YMMV.
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by Jaqen » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:03 pm

In the video above it appeared the pig had bled out by the time they applied the Quick Clot. When the doctor wipes out the wound notice the blood flow is near zero before the QC is dumped in.

I have a few bags of QC but after reading the big thread and watching the video above I'd have to be in dire straights to ever use it - like severing a main artery as mentioned in the video. I think using QC on a large non-arterial laceration without advanced medical care afterward would kill most folks due to resulting infection. As long as medical attention was available I'd use it. If in doubt - no way.

Discussions of late have made me spend some time thinking about QC. I see it as a "Hail Mary" option in a PAW unless professional care is available.

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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by DaveJohns » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:11 pm

Jaqen wrote: Discussions of late have made me spend some time thinking about QC. I see it as a "Hail Mary" option in a PAW unless professional care is available.
+1. I have a few packs of both QC and Celox, but I would only put them to use in a critical situation, such as a main artery laceration. I like having the option available, but then again, the general expectation is that these agents need up to 3 minutes to work - 3 minutes is plenty of time to bleed out. I would reach for a dressing and apply lots of pressure in almost every situation I can think of.
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by The Highwayman » Fri Jul 17, 2009 10:07 pm

While I agree that hemostatics are only for use as a last resort, "this guys gonna die if I don't use it" type tool, I just wanted to point out something. I'm not sure of other brands, but I carry QC ACS and QC Sport, both of them latest generation. Not only have they addressed the issue of the exothermic reactions in previous versions, but now the only types I have are actually guaze bandages inpregnated with the hemostatic. Therefore, no more fumbling with pouring some powder all over the place, as well as much easier debridement/cleanup of the wound, IMO.
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by acropolis5 » Sat Jul 18, 2009 4:23 pm

Does this stuff really go useless soon after the expiration date?

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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by Ovationman » Sat Jul 18, 2009 4:35 pm

acropolis5 wrote:Does this stuff really go useless soon after the expiration date?
I would guess no it does not. Seems pretty chemically stable, Just keep it away from water. However if you have the money, conservative is better when it comes to lifesaving stuff.

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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by throwback » Sun Jul 19, 2009 7:38 pm

Does this stuff really go useless soon after the expiration date?
As a matter of fact, in the case of hemcons, at least, the stuff works faster as it gets older. Perhaps there is an upward limit, but as of 2007 (the last time I checked in an official capacity) the company was still granting extensions on every lot of bandages yet sold. That is kind of unusual, particularly for a product that gave them $70- $100 gross with every sale. Gotta give credit where it is due, they stand behind their product.
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by Kutter_0311 » Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:59 am

If you get the '1st Response' QC pouches it is X-ray locatable.

Presumably, allowing a bit of QC to drift into your bloodstream would be a BAD thing...
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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by carbonbased » Fri Jul 31, 2009 7:00 am

Another question on the quick clot sport pouches.
It snuggest that you pack it into the wound to stop bleeding, however thought this would work for a gash or cut, what about a puncture, stab or GSW? Bad idea to try and tear open the packet and pour it into the wound so it can act as close as possible to the source of the bleeding? Better to just apply it to the surface and apply pressure?

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Re: Question about quick clot

Post by Cwood » Fri Jul 31, 2009 3:39 pm

for a gunshot wound just pour it in a apply pressure. A few warnings about quick clot i've heard are that quick clot could actually cause a "bad clot". Say like you get hit and your bleeding from a major artery. Well quick clot did stop the bleeding but small admounts of it are in the blood stream and have mini clots that could go to your brain and cause a stroke. Well when you think about bleeding to death or maybe having a stroke, ofcourse your going to go with the one you know will safe the life and take the risk. There was a artical in the army times about this danger and saying it should be taken out of theater, but the counter to that is it is saving lives and is worth the risk.
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