Anyone have experience with green goo?

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ssgcmw
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Anyone have experience with green goo?

Post by ssgcmw » Sat Jun 23, 2018 12:17 pm

Saw this on a gear site and was intrigued by the concept: Green Goo First Aid salve

Anyone have any experience using it? Only two reviews on Amazon, so I'm hesitant to take a plunge.

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Re: Anyone have experience with green goo?

Post by JayceSlayn » Sat Jun 23, 2018 1:29 pm

This salve supposedly adheres to the HPUS (Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States), not that I trust the HPUS as much as the USP (United States Pharmacopoeia), but at least it carries a semblance of legitimacy in that regard. Its Active Ingredients label states that all of the various plants used in it are at 1X (10:1) dilution strength. It contains a bunch of plants, but the only ones I'm familiar with in a first-aid capacity are yarrow and sage. The others might be useful too, I just know I've studied those before.

While my knee-jerk reaction is to turn my nose up at anything that associates itself with homeopathy, this salve is at least at a very low dilution (the opposite of "potency" by homeopathic definitions), so at least it contains "something" of the original active ingredients (though it doesn't specify what the final concentrations are, which I'd prefer), rather than literally nothing of the original ingredients. The balance is beeswax and a bunch more plant essential oils etc.

For its intended use - to just cover up minor scrapes and burns - it probably won't hurt. And some of the active ingredient plants have been used historically to treat wounds, so it might be better than nothing, but there is a great lack of modern, high-quality, scientific research to establish the efficacy of natural medicines. I'd like to see more research on natural medicines, but I think it suffers from two problems: the first being that there is a stigma in western medicine against them, and two that I think they are less easily monetizable/patentable for big pharma companies, so they ignore them.
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Re: Anyone have experience with green goo?

Post by ssgcmw » Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:01 pm

Thanks for the in-depth response!

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CG
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Re: Anyone have experience with green goo?

Post by CG » Sun Jun 24, 2018 10:20 pm

Calendula, plantain, comfrey, yarrow, and myrrh are often used in herbal recipes for salves. I have calendula-infused oil in the fridge for when I make my next batch.

I'd definitely be interested in a product like this if I ran across it in a store and could buy a single travel size one.
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Re: Anyone have experience with green goo?

Post by JeeperCreeper » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:14 pm

Reminded me of the ole "black salve" or draw-out-salve.

It's gotten a bad rep due to people using for cancer but I wanna say that "black salve" has been a term used in different recipes of medicinal salves.

The one that I am familiar with... that is quite useful for splinters, boils, ingrown toenails/hairs, and small or superficial infections... is made from ichthammol and sometimes pine tar.

The one that is sold as a cancer cure uses bloodroot and can cause skin necrosis.
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