putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Discussions of the best (or worst) equipment to have on hand for use in the event of an injury during an emergency.

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putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by cheech_sp » Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:36 am

I witnessed an accident Saturday night; a drunk lady pulled out of a country bar, almost smashed to bikers, gunned it, started swerving and rolled in less than 60 seconds.

I put on my flashers, flagged other motorists of the wreck, and pulled over to park. My wife called 911, and we saw that the car was upside down on the railroad tracks (active tracks used daily by Amtrak). I got out and ran to the wreck, I didn't immediately see a person, and was afraid that she was under the car. But she was was unconscious laying on the inside roof.

Maybe I shouldn't have, but due to being on the tracks; I opened the door, grabbed her legs and pulled her out. She woke up and sat up next to the car. She had blood on her forehead, but it wasn't coming out too bad. Now I felt dumb, I didn't have anything to put on her head to stop any bleeding. Another witness handed me a stocking cap that must have been in the wrecked car, and I kept it pressed to her head until EMS got there in 5-10 minutes.

Now I want to put together a small kit that I wish I could have grabbed and taken to the wreck. I already have a decent BOB in the trunk, with a FAK. But this kit doesn't need pills, moleskin, water treatment, etc. I just want the items necessary to get to an accident victim, and apply pressure to stop bleeding until EMS arrives.

My Amazon list so far:
http://amzn.com/w/1XUJ3QXSRTL71
- small bag
- seat belt cutter / window breaker
- work gloves (in case of sharp metal/glass)
- nitrile gloves
- goggles
- bandages
- flashlight

Thinking back on the experience, I'm very surprised the door opened and the window in that door was still intact. If the door didn't open I could have broken the window (if I had the tool with me) and then cleared broken glass (with work gloves), and maybe could have pulled her through it. She was not a big person, if she was I probably couldn't have pulled her through a window.

I'm open to any constructive suggestions for the bag or how to handle future situations, thanks.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Murph » Tue Oct 28, 2014 2:02 pm

Here's a few of my suggestions:

resqme The Original Keychain Car Escape Tool
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003PO38P2/
It has a spring loaded window punch, and strap cutter. You can put it on your keychain, but I trick I learned is to zip-tie it to something that both the driver and passenger can reach. (Like a stick shifter.)

Mechanix Gloves (with an elastic cuff)
They're easy to slip on and protect your hands, but still allow for some tactile feel.

Nitrile Gloves that you can see blood on.
If you're assessing a patient and doing a hands on sweep for blood, black doesn't work very well. A cheap pack of light blue works, but recently I've found blaze orange gloves, which also double as a way for people to see you.

Traffic Safety Vest with Reflective Strips
Again, under the "helps people see you" category.

Benchmade Safety Cutter
http://www.amazon.com/Benchmade-BLKW-Mo ... 0013QVC1Q/
These work a lot better than trauma sheers for cutting clothing, belts, boots, etc.

Road Flares
See if you can get your hands on some authentic road flares. All the modern glow sticks, flashing lights, and fold out traffic signs are junk.

Emergency Medical Equipment
First I'd suggest taking at least a Red Cross First Aid / CPR Class, and then seek additional training if available. After that, the keys to providing emergency medical assistance are: Make Sure the Scene is Safe, Stop Major Bleeding, Keep Their Heart Beating, Keep Them Breathing. So things like: Tourniquets, Hemostatic Gauzes, Compression Bandages, Occlusive Dressings, Airway Devices, CPR Masks could all be possibilities if you know how to use them. Another possibility with motor vehicle accidents is spinal trauma, so that needs to be taken into consideration when helping people.

Space All Weather Blanket
http://www.amazon.com/Space-All-Weather ... 0007RSGQ6/
These are way better than those disposable space blankets. They're thicker, more like tarp material, and one with a silver side and a colored side. Again, I'd suggest bright colors. It can help prevent hypothermia and shock.

Tow Strap, Jumper Cables / Jumper Battery, Wrench Set
Not medical related, but are indispensable when it comes to vehicle emergencies.

Shovel
I live in an area that gets snow, so a good shovel is another must have.

Mini-Mag Light
Ditch it. It's old technology, there are better lights out there. And in vehicle emergencies it is not very useful, because you generally need to hold to direct the light where you need it, and you'll almost always need two hands to do anything. A headlamp is a much better choice.
Does your BOB at least have: water, basic tools, fire, food, first-aid kit, and shelter?
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by offcamber » Tue Oct 28, 2014 2:09 pm

Murph hit most of the stuff in his post, especially the saftey vest and flares.

The only thing I would really add is a fire extinguisher.

Its a great addition to a personal roadside kit, but can also be used at accidents etc if required.

I'm always surprised at how few folks carry one.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Murph » Tue Oct 28, 2014 2:16 pm

offcamber wrote:The only thing I would really add is a fire extinguisher.
lol, yup.
I knew I'd forgot something without going out to my car to look through it.
Good catch!!
Does your BOB at least have: water, basic tools, fire, food, first-aid kit, and shelter?
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Stercutus » Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:23 pm

I would forget about the key chain rescue tool. Most of them are not worth a cup of spit. A crowbar or wrecking bar on the other hand will get you into just about any car, really fast with minimum fuss. Having one on hand is useful for other stuff too. A strap cutter is not bad idea however it is of limited usefulness.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by LJ126 » Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:44 pm

I generally frown on road flares for car kits. Yes, they're handy, but a mistake that happens more often than you'd think is that in the heat of the moment, people fail to think about unusually dry weather conditions. Stuff rolls, blows, manages to somehow Murphy it's way into where it shouldn't be, and guess what? And if they accident is significant enough, various automotive fluids can be pretty flammable. It could be a medical emergency and a fire waiting to happen.

So yeah, great when you live somewhere that rains every weekend, but during those dry summer spells.... probably better off with the cheezy reflective triangles of doom.

Or... if you're feeling particularly daring, have someone move your car back about 5-10 car lengths from the situation - *depending on the speed of the roadway* - and turn on your emergency flashers, using your vehicle as a beacon. The faster the speed limit, the more distance and advance warning to other drivers you want to give. If someone wants to help but there's no immediate job for them, this is helpful and simple.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by DannusMaximus » Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:14 pm

Skip the space blanket and instead include a wool blanket like you can get (usually cheaply) from a surplus store or surplus outlet. A basic wool blanket can be used for oh so many things...

Keeping a person warm
Providing a way to extinguish small fires
Provide protection from sharps (drape it over jagged metal or glass -- in your example of dragging a person through a car window, for example)
Provide limited thermal protection for you or a trapped person
Roll it up and use it for an ad-hoc c-collar or soft splint
A drag blanket or litter
etc.
etc...
Last edited by DannusMaximus on Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Murph » Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:25 pm

DannusMaximus wrote:Skip the space blanket and instead include a wool blanket like you can get (usually cheaply) from a surplus store or surplus outlet. A basic wool blanket can be used for oh so many things...
Yup, I second that wool blankets are pretty awesome. I have one in my car in addition to the Space All Weather Blanket I linked earlier, because each has certain applications specific only to it.
Does your BOB at least have: water, basic tools, fire, food, first-aid kit, and shelter?
"When planning, prepare for the most likely, and then the most catastrophic."
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by DannusMaximus » Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:04 pm

Murph wrote:
DannusMaximus wrote:Skip the space blanket and instead include a wool blanket like you can get (usually cheaply) from a surplus store or surplus outlet. A basic wool blanket can be used for oh so many things...
Yup, I second that wool blankets are pretty awesome. I have one in my car in addition to the Space All Weather Blanket I linked earlier, because each has certain applications specific only to it.
Fair enough. Having one of each covers that many more contingencies!
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Burncycle » Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:55 pm

Good on you for helping. As a good Samaritan, the decision to even try and help is more than many would make. Just make sure the scene is safe before you get involved.

Bleeding and airways are two things you can help with that can make the difference between life and death until first responders and EMS get there. If you just have a single patient that you can focus your attention on, direct pressure is probably going to be enough to control bleeding until an ambulance arrives. With severe bleeding (ie, they might bleed out before an ambulance arrives) or if you have multiple patients a tourniquet can be a lifesaver.

Definitely get a fire extinguisher as well, and make sure it's secure in your vehicle so it doesn't become a projectile if you're involved in an accident yourself. I'm also a fan of being able to access your extinguisher from your drivers seat. Get CPR/AED certified and take a first aid course if you haven't already. Most of it isn't rocket science, and personally I think it should be part of every high school curriculum. Moving the patient of course depends on the situation, though you can't always avoid it. Check with your local fire department to see if there is a volunteer organization. Usually it doesn't cost you anything but a little time and they'll provide you with training.

Nitrile gloves are always a part of my EDC, and when I'm wearing cargo pants I usually have an Israeli, CAT, Quick Clot gauze and a benchmade hook in one of the pockets (sometimes a HALO). I have that same stuff in my glove compartment as well.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by manowar1313 » Wed Oct 29, 2014 9:36 am

Sounds like a pretty good list.
Old joke: Blond pulls up to an accident, opens her trunk and two men in trench coats jump out. When the paramedics arrive they ask the woman, "Who are those guys?" She responds, "Those are my emergency flashers. Might think about adding those to your car bag.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by airballrad » Wed Oct 29, 2014 9:43 am

Good stuff from the previous replies.

I was in your shoes a few years ago, and my take-aways (what I didn't have that I wished for in hindsight) were the reflective vest, headlamp, more nitrile gloves, and more 4x4 gauze. In my case a couple nurses came by just after I did but they had no equipment. I just happened to have two pairs of gloves, and they were way more qualified, so I let them use my gear while I held the flashlight and everybody was much happier.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by emt442 » Wed Oct 29, 2014 3:30 pm

Here is my two cents (21 years in ems/fire, currently working level 1 trauma center):
-Headlamp ... Leaves your hands free , energizer makes some decent expensive ones , throw some lithium's in and forget about them
-Chem sticks ...can be used in place of flares and great for
Iighting interior of vehicle
-Blanket...wool or good quality all weather
-Go low tech with med bag....bandaging, bleeding control, pocket mask and ppe (gloves and eye pro). No need for iv kits, chest tubes, chest darts, and all the other crap people carry. For the lay person with a basic CPR/first aid class, keeping someone warm, awake, and from bleeding to death is all they need to do until EMS arrives.

What the other guy said about correct placement of your vehicle is good advice,as well as investing in a traffic vest. I work until the wee hours of the night and routinely come upon wrecks on my way home. I have a lot of training and experience but I rarely, if ever, use more than what I have listed above. I do keep a crow bar in my truck for Popping doors or windows. Hate window punches.

Keep it simple

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Wed Oct 29, 2014 3:36 pm

Spare clothes. Massive oversized t-shirt/sweats (As appropriate) in case something gets bloody, or you happen upon someone who is unclothed/underclothed.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by deidaw » Sat Nov 01, 2014 2:18 pm

Hello,
since i enjoyed this forum for quite a while - and learned quite a few things - I´d like to add something my own.
Being german I appologize for all mistakes in my english in advance - I don´t write or speak english often.

In Germany, you are by law obliged to have a standardised first aid kit, a warning triangle and one reflective vest in your car. Since those are a given, a vehicle kit here is built around these items.

Currently, the first aid kit includes the following, as a guidance:
2 skin cleaning tissues
1 roll of self-adhesive plaster
1 plaster assortment, 14 pieces
1 first-aid packet, large
2 first-aid packets, medium
1 first aid dressing
1 burn dressing, small
1 burn dressing, large
3 elastic gauze bandages, 8 cm x 4 m
2 elastic gauze bandages, 6 cm x 4 m
6 wound compresses (3x2 pcs), 10 x 10 cm
2 triangular bandages, not sterile
1 pair of scissors
1 space blanket (german "Rettungsdecke", literally rescue blanket)
4 disposable vinyl gloves, large
1 first-aid brochure
1 table of contents

This is supposed to give every driver the equipment to help one injured person. The idea is that you can´t take care of more than one at a time. And it´s relatively simple to use and cheap to obtain.

Taking first aid lessons is the one thing i recommend most, as several other posters mentioned. You may have all the stuff in the world in your trunk - it´s useless, unless you know how to use it.
Of course, I don´t know exactly what you´d learn in courses held in the United States oder Britain, but here you learn other stuff than threating crash victims, too. How to recognize strokes or heart attacks, or to treat electrocution or drowning victims, for example.
Plus, knowing what to do helps making you doing it in the first place. Quite often people won´t help because they are insecure. Sometimes they don´t even phone for help - I can´t say why, but it happens.
Equally important: Don´t take the course just once. As the first aider at work I am obliged to visit a repeat course every two years to keep the certificate - there are reasons for this. You forget stuff, and there are frequent improvements in procedure. At the last repeat they introduced new procedures for CPR and helmet removal for motorcycle drivers, for example.

I added several things to my car kit:
- Light. I always carry a Fenix flashlight on my belt, i have a headlamp in the glove box (both with lithium batteries), and chemical lights - one under the seat, and three in the first aid kit. I´d use them to secure the site, as emergency light if the electric lights fail, or leave one with the crash victims if I had to leave for a moment. They are near panic anyway, no need to let them sit in the dark.

Had to look up road flares - I dont believe you get those over here. But I plan to get one of those emergency lights with a magnet on the base which you can set on the car roof.
And I got a little red cone I can put on the Fenix - you can then use it to direct traffic or use as something like an electric road flare.

The point is, helping in a car crash at night is difficult and it is dangerous. Try finding anything in the first aid kit in the dark. Or even the victims of the crash - one of the two crashes where I helped so far was in the night and i saw them go off the road and down a small hill. Luckily they weren´t severly injured, only quite shaken and with some cuts and bruises. But, without the flashlight I would have had a hard time even finding the car, since they lost their car battery - literally. And you can´t always use the headlights on your own car as floodlights. Half the time you are just blinding yourself with them.

At the very least get an app for your smartphone to use your camera LED as a flashlight, if it doesn´t come with that feature on its own.

Secure the site and make yourself visible! And make it the first thing you do! Yes, there are people hurt, maybe even in danger of dying. But you can´t help anybody if you are run over by a another car. You´d only make the situation worse.

Turn on your flashers, turn on your headlights (flashers are, depending on the angle, only dots in the dark. The headlight beams make it easier to see the position and heading of your car. The beam is more or less the same length on all cars, so its easier to gauge the distance to it).

If the crashed car or cars are still on the road, position your car before it, if possible. Your lights are working and you will prevent other cars from crashing also.

Put up the warning triangle in a considerable distance. I often see broken down vehicles on the highway with a triangle two meters away from the trunk. The drivers could leave them in the trunk for all the good it will do them.
When you do set it up, wear a vest and, if at all possible, don´t walk on the road, especially the highway. Walk beside it and hold the warning triangle in the direction you are going.

And get warning vests for all seats in your car. Make your passengers use them. And get them in 3XL. Something I learned when my car broke down in the midst of winter - a vest you can wear over a t-shirt does definitly not fit over winter clothes...
Nice trick I actually learned from youtube: If you have one more vest than passengers and you have to stop on the road, take it and hang it in the open trunk hatch. Even the slightest breeze will make it move and the movement together with the bright colour it will make your car more visible from behing, even in daylight.

Always leave the car on the non-traffic side. And leave the road, if possible, at least to the other side of a guard rail, if its there.

The second crash where I was one of the first responders, if not a first aider, was when a package delivery guy had his van break down on the highway. He pulled to the side, left the car, even put on his vest. He opened the engine compartment, stepped to the side and got hit by a semi. He was instantly dead.
As a pedestrian, you don´t wear a ton of metal like a driver. Treat the traffic with the utmost respect and stay observant and attentive. Always expect others to make mistakes and try no to mistakes yourself.

I am writing all this because site security is a point my first aid instructors make sure is driven home every time I take the course.
Police, firefighters, ambulances - they have all the lights and all the safety equipment they can and still they frequently get rear-ended or they get run over. Private cars even more so. Even large semis with their lights on get rear-ended on the breakdown lane. You wouldn´t suppose someone would overlook one of those.
So reduce the chances of that happening by whatever means possible.
(My first aid instructors are from the Red Cross and are always active EMTs themselves. At least one of them has seen this happening, resulting in one dead and one disabled police officer when they were hit by a car and thrown against a bridge support against which a car had crashed beforehand).

By the way, a lot of the stuff I am writing down here comes from those Red Cross members, not me. Thanks a lot to them.

And please, please, double-please: Do not gawk when passing an accident! It´s a hazard. Look at the damn traffic. This is a serious problem here in Germany. Some drivers even try to take pictures - while driving.

- A window breaker/ belt cutter combo. Have to admit, i never even thought about a small crowbar or such. Hmmh, next time when I´m in the hardware store..

- Winter work gloves. The winter model not because of the cold, but because of the added padding.

- My old Samsung cell phone, prepaid, in the glove box. After years of resisting I now carry a smartphone. Very usefull overall, but I need to charge the thing at least every other day. The old cell gives me a second way to call for help if I forget the charging part.

- Upgrades to the mandatory first aid kit:
the above mentioned chemical lights
better scissors
a second space blanket (by the way, people here often forget they do have means with them to keep warm, for example in traffic jams or in broken down cars)
a CPR mouth cover. I do not know the english word for those. You put them over the victims mouth while giving rescue breathing.
Better gloves. Those in the commercially sold first aid kits suck.

- Some stuff not related to accidents. A fleece blanket, my old 3in1 outdoor jacket and starter cables in the winter. Some tools, towline, a cheap rain poncho, a half a liter soda PET bottle with wiper fluid, a set of replacement bulbs for all car lights (once both headlights in that shitty Hyundai I drove then blew out at the same time. Good luck finding replacements in the middle of night if there isn´t a gas station nearby. It was a long walk).

I´d really like to have a fire extinguisher in my car, there just is no place for it. The father of one of my exes once had an electrical fire and ripped out cables with his bare hands to keep the fire from spreading. Guess it wasn´t that pleasant an experience, judging from his burn marks.

Oh, and take some thoughts on where you put your emergency stuff. A first aid kit is something you need very fast. Putting it in the trunk under the spare tire doesn´t cut it.
I found a set of first aid kit and warning triangle combined in one bag with velcro on the outside. I put it behind the driver seat on the front base of the rear seat. This way, a passenger on the rear seat can give it to me or I reach around the back of the drivers seat and grab it myself.

And rearrange your first aid kit, especially if its a commercial one. The designers of these things are more concerned with making them as compact as possible and arranged neatly. Put the band aids, the gloves and the scissors loosely on top.
If there is just a cut or something not so dangerous, you don´t have to empty the entire kit, just use the band aids. If there is a serious accident, it doesn´t matter if you loose them, you´ll need the heavy stuff. And then you´ll need the gloves first. If there are serious injuries, you´ll need the scissors second, to remove clothing. I often read here on the board that your first aid kits contain some military type bandages which might be used on oneself. These might also be put on top.
I don´t keep the window punch/belt cutter combo in the first aid kit. I may have to use it myself one day, so I keep it in a easily reached dash compartment. Maybe I´ll get a second one and put it in the first aid kit. All in one place.

And one advice I´d like to give from personal experience:
When I whitnessed the first crash, I nearly panicked. I had seen accidents and treated wounds before, but in that moment when I saw that car crash (well, I only saw the headlights first go up and than vanish in the dark, but it was clear what happened) there was such an adrenaline rush, I suppose, I very nearly crashed myself and then stopped and went looking in the dark - without my first aid kit.
Btw, thats why i mentioned the use of the chemical lights for leaving them with the injured. I had to leave those two sitting in the wreck without a light and climb up the damn hill to get the damn first aid stuff and then go back that damn hill back down again. Stupid.
So if you happen upon an accident - stay seated some seconds, take a deep breath, calm down (easier said...). And try to visualize what you´ll need and where it is in your car. It helps if it is all in one place.
Better to loose seconds thinking and gearing up than to loose minutes by running back.

Hmmh. This post has gotten a lot longer than planned... Hope it helps and i hope i didn´t put to many mistakes or "germanisms" in it.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by K9medic » Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:14 am

I would also add a disposable camera or a cheap digital one, note book and a few different coloured pens, just in case vehicles need to be moved for safety reasons.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Gaston » Mon Apr 06, 2015 3:37 pm

deidaw wrote:I´d really like to have a fire extinguisher in my car, there just is no place for it.
By whatever means necessary, FIND a place, please. I've used mine to put out two engine compartment fires, and one to finish extinguish a kitchen fire in my home (I used up the kitchen extinguisher but had some fire left, had to run out and retrieve my car unit to finish the job).

I'm sorry for the necro-post but I'm fairly new to the forum and just happened upon this post, and I thought this important enough to comment. If you can't put out or at least seriously curb an auto fire, the rest of your kit may be worthless.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by taipan821 » Sat Jun 06, 2015 9:04 pm

Just found this topic. very interesting to see people's views.

I've recently started to carry a set of eflares in my vehicle, http://www.eflarecorp.com/
and deidaw, they do make products that conform to german road regulations
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by teotwaki » Wed Jun 10, 2015 3:23 pm

eFlares and chemsticks can also be safer to deploy if there is any worry of gasoline spills from the wreck(s)
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by LyraJean » Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:18 pm

Not weather related but car related. Along with jumper cables I keep a 2 gallon plastic gas can in my car. Just in case I run out of gas. I only have a 2 gallon because I doubt I could carry a 5 gallon one by myself. I have practically zero upper body strength but it's getting better my 3 year old weighs 41 lbs and I can carry him a good spell.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Langenator » Thu Jun 11, 2015 10:05 am

Good stuff in this thread. I have a pickup truck, and I'm still trying to figure out a good spot to stash a fire extinguisher, without stashing it in the milkcrate of random items (oil, anti-freeze, etc) that lives in the bed.
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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by drop bear » Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:09 pm

LyraJean wrote:Not weather related but car related. Along with jumper cables I keep a 2 gallon plastic gas can in my car. Just in case I run out of gas. I only have a 2 gallon because I doubt I could carry a 5 gallon one by myself. I have practically zero upper body strength but it's getting better my 3 year old weighs 41 lbs and I can carry him a good spell.
Run your car constantly full rather than constantly empty. Costs the same.

A shifter to remove the battery and prevent fires.

Rope to secure the car if it ts teetering.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by Cosmic Osmo » Mon Sep 14, 2015 4:26 pm

Keeping a container of gas in your car is generally a bad idea. Containers always "breathe" a little bit of vapor, so you are filling your car with flammable and toxic gasoline fumes. In an accident, the gas can is easier to rupture than your actual gas tank, so you are increasing the chance of that accident becoming a flaming accident.

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Re: putting together a Vehicle Accident Kit

Post by AfleetAlex » Mon Sep 14, 2015 4:42 pm

Never move an accident victim unless it is an emergency, meaning you see the train actually coming or you see artery blood spurting. Instead, clear the way to remove the victim if necessary, but leave them in place until EMS can assist.

For basic accident First Aid, all you need is disposable surgical gloves, disposable surgical masks, surgical sissors to remove clothing, absorbant cloths, strips of cloth to tie onto multiple wounds requiring pressure, tourniquets for arterial bleeds and space blankets. Carrying a fire extinguisher is a great idea. If you want to get really fancy, check out a YouTube vid on recognizing and stablilizing a sucking chest wound, and carry the large bandages and tape required to apply the dressing.

As for securing the scene...Park a car at least 200ft before the accident in flow of traffic blocking the accident and use flashers. If some idiot comes, you don't want them running you all over. Use your car as a shield.
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