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Trauma Kit

Posted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 2:39 pm
by acropolis5
Many thanx for the good advice. I read the article, as well. A bit above my skill level, but I think I got the important parts. I've kept an Asherman, 33" Gorilla tape(2"), and a decompression needle in my small "trauma Kit". I mainly keep the needle for use by someone with the required skill level. I've also included a TK-4 tourniquet, compressed crinkle gauze, 25gr. Quik Clot sponge, roll of 3" Coban, 8" x5" Combine dressing, 4" x10" ThinCinch dressing and a pair of nitrile gloves. It all fits in a heavy duty, 5"x8" zip-lock bag. That along with vial of common OTC med.s, including chewable aspirin, and a "boo-boo" kit, in a 3"x5" bag, are my EDC bag first-aid-kit.

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 6:44 pm
by weatherdude
acropolis5 wrote:Many thanx for the good advice. I read the article, as well. A bit above my skill level, but I think I got the important parts. I've kept an Asherman, 33" Gorilla tape(2"), and a decompression needle in my small "trauma Kit". I mainly keep the needle for use by someone with the required skill level. I've also included a TK-4 tourniquet, compressed crinkle gauze, 25gr. Quik Clot sponge, roll of 3" Coban, 8" x5" Combine dressing, 4" x10" ThinCinch dressing and a pair of nitrile gloves. It all fits in a heavy duty, 5"x8" zip-lock bag. That along with vial of common OTC med.s, including chewable aspirin, and a "boo-boo" kit, in a 3"x5" bag, are my EDC bag first-aid-kit.
Get a better TQ....TK-4s SUCK.....go with a SOF-T or CAT.

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:32 pm
by acropolis5
Weatherdude: The relative merits of thee TK-3/4 seems to raise a lot of strong feelings on both sides. The first time I read the "it sucks" criticism, I researched the available on-line studies, including one done for the armed forces. Everything I read rated the TK -4, highly and easiest to store and apply. Can you share the basis for your opposite opinion? Many years ago, as a volunteer EMT, I managed to effectively tourniquet the almost severed leg of a bus driver with a medium size thickness of latex tubing. He lived to leave the hospital, minus the leg. So I know it worked. The TK -4 should be better, IMO. What say you? P.S. I left out of the Trauma Kit list the 28 French nasal airway, that's also packed.

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 2:14 pm
by Doctorr Fabulous
My assessment of the TK4 is that it doesn't give enough compression without narrowing down and potentially causing tissue damage. It's not something I'd want to apply when the ETA for higher echelon care is a big question mark. Better than nothing, but I'd rather have a CAT, because it's what I'm familiar with.

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:26 am
by Murph
acropolis5 wrote:Weatherdude: The relative merits of thee TK-3/4 seems to raise a lot of strong feelings on both sides. The first time I read the "it sucks" criticism, I researched the available on-line studies, including one done for the armed forces. Everything I read rated the TK -4, highly and easiest to store and apply. Can you share the basis for your opposite opinion? Many years ago, as a volunteer EMT, I managed to effectively tourniquet the almost severed leg of a bus driver with a medium size thickness of latex tubing. He lived to leave the hospital, minus the leg. So I know it worked. The TK -4 should be better, IMO. What say you? P.S. I left out of the Trauma Kit list the 28 French nasal airway, that's also packed.
Not sure what "studies" those are, but here are two research studies:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16263675
http://oai.dtic.mil/oai/oai?verb=getRec ... =ADA480501

And if you don't like big words and data here is a decent run down of things:
http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/n ... ated-equal

I own a number of different TQs. I've found that the elastic/rubber based TQs are both harder to apply and don't work as well (completely stop my pulse.) I'd suggest reading up on it, evaluating multiple products yourself, and making an educated decision. Saying a shitty TQ could work better than an improvised TQ isn't exactly informed "Science!".

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 12:10 pm
by VXMerlinXV
acropolis5 wrote: Many years ago, as a volunteer EMT, I managed to effectively tourniquet the almost severed leg of a bus driver with a medium size thickness of latex tubing.
You stopped an amputated leg's arterial bleeding with a length of surgical tubing?

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 3:11 pm
by DannusMaximus
Murph wrote:I own a number of different TQs. I've found that the elastic/rubber based TQs are both harder to apply and don't work as well (completely stop my pulse.)
Concur with the above.

I use a SWAT-T at work because it's what we're issued.

I have a CAT in my own FAK's because I think they are easier to apply (especially to yourself, and especially one-handed) and work better.

YMMV.

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 12:20 am
by acropolis5
vXmerlinXV, Yes I/we did. I was lead Crew Chief. It was early 1970s. It amazed me even then. The driver had crashed into the Semi ahead. It was an old flat front bus. The dashboard had just about cut his leg off. The tubing was our only tourniquet. We got it on skin and used the mouth block, i.e. 3 wooden young depressors, wrapped with a 4"x4" and taped over, as a windlass. We also applied pressure bandages. Then the FD cut him free. We had stretcher, at the ready, loaded him and had him to hospital in 3-4 minutes. It is a very urban area. Perhaps the crush injury helped to occlude the artery. I don't know. But it worked

Re: Trauma Kit

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:08 am
by VXMerlinXV
acropolis5 wrote:vXmerlinXV, Yes I/we did. I was lead Crew Chief. It was early 1970s. It amazed me even then. The driver had crashed into the Semi ahead. It was an old flat front bus. The dashboard had just about cut his leg off. The tubing was our only tourniquet. We got it on skin and used the mouth block, i.e. 3 wooden young depressors, wrapped with a 4"x4" and taped over, as a windlass. We also applied pressure bandages. Then the FD cut him free. We had stretcher, at the ready, loaded him and had him to hospital in 3-4 minutes. It is a very urban area. Perhaps the crush injury helped to occlude the artery. I don't know. But it worked
Nice work! Maybe surgical tubing was stiffer in the 70's?