Salt for the long term?

Discuss lifestyle changes to better survive disasters. This category is for topics pertaining to being self reliant such as DIY, farming, alternative energy, autonomous solutions to water collection and waste removal, etc.

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ryan80
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Salt for the long term?

Post by ryan80 » Tue May 22, 2012 1:51 pm

First post here guys. I have done a lot of reading on self sufficient living. A lot of the self sufficent books teach you how to make almost everything for yourself. One day I hope to have a self-sufficient farm with very few things that I need to buy from the outside world. One gaping hole to me seems to be where I would get salt for preserving meats. In the southeastern US, where would my supply of salt come from 10 years into an end of society disaster--or just if I want to have a small farm with a minimal number of purchased goods? How much salt would Ineed to have stored to continue to make bacon, hams and salted beef for years to come? Anyone have any thoughts on this?

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Tank Woman » Tue May 22, 2012 2:33 pm

Welcome :)
Salt is one of those things many people stock in large quantity because it is difficult for most people to "make" for themselves. We live only a few miles from the ocean, but have chosen to go ahead and stock salt instead of trying to process or acquire it in bad times. Luckily, salt is very inexpensive, easy to find in many forms, and stores easily indefinitely.
Our stock includes table salt, coarse kosher salt (for pickling), pink Himalayan salt (also for pickling) and we plan to add salt blocks this year. We simply store our salt in their original packaging inside an airtight storage container.
If you are planning to use salt for preservation, you will need large quantities, hundreds of pounds for the long haul.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Gingerbread Man » Tue May 22, 2012 4:36 pm

Salt is one of my main preps. I buy a couple containers every time I hit the store. Too affordable not to.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by VinnieD » Wed May 23, 2012 4:37 am

I wonder how useful buying a big rock of salt lick would be. Also if you live in Mississippi, some parts are known for large salt deposits and even salt caves which are salt outcroppings that have been worn into caves by animals coming to lick the salt.

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Crazy Wolf » Wed May 23, 2012 4:16 pm

Salt was waaaaaay more expensive before the advent of modern salt-refining techniques. Either find and buy a salt mine, buy a shit-ton of salt licks, or make very good friends with people who live by the sea and supply them with fuel to boil away the water, assuming they don't have enough oceanfront property to do the whole French "fleur de sel" salt-marsh techniques (weather and climate permitting). Also, can you find a cave, or fabricate a reasonable facsimile of one with enough insulation?
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by NamelessStain » Wed May 23, 2012 4:56 pm

Regular Guy wrote:Salt is one of my main preps. I buy a couple containers every time I hit the store. Too affordable not to.
+1

Every time I go to Costco I grab a 1 pound box for $1.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Thu May 24, 2012 12:42 am

So what's the best way to buy bulk salt? Will the 40lb plastic bags from a pool supply work? Will they need to be repackaged?
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by ZombieGranny » Thu May 24, 2012 1:14 am

I bought a 50 pound Morton's salt block back in 2007 or 2008 at the feed store for $5. It's salt with iodine added (no weird additives) just like that on your table. Still chiseling chucks off it. No problem with the salt; but the plastic deteriorated, so we have had to replace the container we had it in.
I checked with our doctor before buying it.

*Not all salt blocks are the same! Please check carefully if you plan to do this. You don't want any medications, insecticides, etc. There are NON-mineral added blocks as well.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Stercutus » Thu May 24, 2012 7:07 am

Pool store salt is not approved for human consumption. Does not mean that you can not use it ten years into the apocalypse. Read the package carefully and and make sure there are no proprietary formula additives like anti-algae agents and you will likely be fine. If there are you might get induced Wilson's Disease and die.

Pool store salt does not have iodine in it either. So I would not use it at the table.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Thu May 24, 2012 8:04 am

What's with the iodine? And the feed-store salt lick seems to be the way to go, with careful reading of certain labels.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Gingerbread Man » Thu May 24, 2012 8:09 am

Doc Torr wrote:What's with the iodine?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodised_salt" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Iodised salt (also spelled iodized salt) is table salt mixed with a minute amount of various iodine-containing salts. The ingestion of iodide prevents iodine deficiency. Worldwide, iodine deficiency affects about two billion people and is the leading preventable cause of mental retardation.[1] Deficiency also causes thyroid gland problems, including "endemic goitre". In many countries, iodine deficiency is a major public health problem that can be cheaply addressed by iodisation of salt.

Iodine is a micronutrient and dietary mineral that is naturally present in the food supply in some regions, especially near sea coasts, but is generally quite rare in the Earth's crust, since iodine is a so-called "heavy" element with the highest atomic mass of any element needed by mammals for life), and abundance of chemical elements generally declines with greater atomic mass. Where natural levels of iodine in the soil are low and the iodine is not taken up by vegetables, iodine added to salt provides the small but essential amount of iodide needed by humans.

Iodide-treated table salt slowly loses its iodine content through the process of oxidation and iodine evaporation.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by ZombieGranny » Thu May 24, 2012 9:08 am

Doc Torr wrote:What's with the iodine? And the feed-store salt lick seems to be the way to go, with careful reading of certain labels.
Salt without iodine is good for pickles, the iodine makes the brine cloudy.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Florida_Tony » Thu May 24, 2012 11:38 am

Hi Ryan. Welcome. :)

If you're 10 years into a disaster and you still can't buy salt somewhere, then I think you'll have bigger problems to worry about. Humans need salt to survive, so if there's any semblance of society, people will mine and sell salt. It may be expensive, but it'll be available.

Nevertheless, I still store a lot of salt. I've got two of those 5 gallon buckets filled with salt. To keep it from caking, I used mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. Those buckets will last indefinitely.

Each person needs 2-3 pounds of salt per year in their diet. I've got over 60 pounds stored, so that should last me and my family quite a while. If you need to preserve meat, then store even more. I'm sure others will need it during a crisis, so it's also good for trading.

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by GunnerMax » Fri May 25, 2012 4:09 am

This topic has my attention. Thank you for the approximation that a person need about 6 pounds of salt a year.

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Polie » Fri May 25, 2012 4:24 am

ZombieGranny wrote:
Doc Torr wrote:What's with the iodine? And the feed-store salt lick seems to be the way to go, with careful reading of certain labels.
Salt without iodine is good for pickles, the iodine makes the brine cloudy.
You NEED iodine in your diet. So you need to have a way in ingest iodine, and salt with iodine is a decent way. Use your picking salt for preserving but you still need to have iodized salt.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by buck85 » Sat May 26, 2012 11:51 pm

Salt will become a major trade item in the paw. Living near the gulf coast of north Florida,production of salt from the ocean has crossed my mind,but I have to many other active interests/hobbies to give it no more than a passing thought.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by AKFTW » Sun May 27, 2012 2:28 am

Salt is the foundation of civilization, and the control over salt has been one of the major sources of wealth and power throughout history. If in a PAW you have any thoughts that society may revert back to a more primitive form than the present day, I'd say it's definitely a worthwhile prep.
http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_HistoryOfSalt.asp

Plus, y'know, you can put it on food and stuff to make it taste better.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by ineffableone » Sun May 27, 2012 5:25 am

Historically salt has been a major trade item. People often defended their salt mines, or other salt sources with extreme seriousness. The term salary comes from salt from when solders were paid with salt.

So where would your salt come from? Most likely from someone who did their research and located salt mines. Or from the sea. You will most likely trade quite a bit for your salt.

If you want to be the one sitting on the salt mine, trading with others, then check the links below.

You can look here for the major salt deposits of the US http://www.saltinstitute.org/content/view/full/4229

Or you can find more regional info like this one for Kansas http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bull ... _salt.html

Of course one problem with a lot of minerals, if society collapses it might be difficult to access minerals as we have taken most of the easy to get surface mineral deposits already. 10 years into PAW if things have not come back then it is likely we will never rebuild society like we had. Old mines will collapse and become too dangerous. Not just salt but a lot of minerals will be come very difficult to find once the left overs left by the crumbling society are used up.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by GunnerMax » Mon May 28, 2012 12:42 am

Do you guys remember in Jericho, the TV show (may it RIP) that a salt mine was referenced more than once? They used it as a form of currency. IIRC

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by ineffableone » Mon May 28, 2012 12:47 am

GunnerMax wrote:Do you guys remember in Jericho, the TV show (may it RIP) that a salt mine was referenced more than once? They used it as a form of currency. IIRC
FYI, Netflix is negotiating to get the rights to restart Jericho. Cross your fingers.

http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2 ... cbs-drama/
BRIAN STELTER wrote:Netflix, which has ordered new episodes of the former Fox sitcom, “Arrested Development,” may be resurrecting another cancelled show, “Jericho.”

The possibility was reported on Tuesday by TV Guide Magazine, which said that Netflix had approached the original maker of “Jericho,” CBS Television Studios, about making new episodes of the show that it could stream. The magazine said that the studio was considering doing so.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by RogerK » Mon May 28, 2012 8:05 am

Part of the Roman Legionary's pay was in salt. Just sayin' :mrgreen:
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by raptor » Mon May 28, 2012 10:51 am

ZombieGranny wrote:
Doc Torr wrote:What's with the iodine? And the feed-store salt lick seems to be the way to go, with careful reading of certain labels.
Salt without iodine is good for pickles, the iodine makes the brine cloudy.

I agree. People need iodine. They do NOT need iodized salt. It is quite possible to obtain sufficient iodine from natural sources.

Iodizing salt was a voluntary process first introduced nationally in the US in 1924 by Morton's Salt as a means to increase sales. The iodine in the salt was beneficial and it allowed Morton Salt to increase it's brand identity promoting health. A win-win for all concerned.

That said humans need only 150 micrograms (about 1/20,000th of a teaspoon) iodine daily. This level can be obtained by eating a variety of foods. The problem is that humans do not store iodine so a littel must be ingested daily.

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/artic ... iodine.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So no you do not need iodized salt.

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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by Crazy Wolf » Mon May 28, 2012 12:45 pm

raptor wrote:
ZombieGranny wrote:
Doc Torr wrote:What's with the iodine? And the feed-store salt lick seems to be the way to go, with careful reading of certain labels.
Salt without iodine is good for pickles, the iodine makes the brine cloudy.

I agree. People need iodine. They do NOT need iodized salt. It is quite possible to obtain sufficient iodine from natural sources.

Iodizing salt was a voluntary process first introduced nationally in the US in 1924 by Morton's Salt as a means to increase sales. The iodine in the salt was beneficial and it allowed Morton Salt to increase it's brand identity promoting health. A win-win for all concerned.

That said humans need only 150 micrograms (about 1/20,000th of a teaspoon) iodine daily. This level can be obtained by eating a variety of foods. The problem is that humans do not store iodine so a littel must be ingested daily.

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/artic ... iodine.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So no you do not need iodized salt.
It would still be a handy prep in the even that your normal food systems are disrupted, and you have to live off of rice and beans (basically, if you can't get veggies {particularly sea veggies}, milk, or eggs). There are ways to get iodine without using iodized salt, you are correct. But those methods would likely risk disruption in the event of an emergency, unless you have your own chickens, live by the sea, have a cow, or have a strawberry patch.
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Re: Salt for the long term?

Post by phil_in_cs » Mon May 28, 2012 1:08 pm

Sam's carries 25lb sacks of iodized salt for under $4. Keep it dry and it will last thousands of years.
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