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Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:26 am
by skyreep
Out here in North Carolina (Tobacco Country) we have loads of old tobacco barns that are rotting away, some that are built with planking and others that are built with logs. So I'm curious, how can you take old gray barn planking Image

And turn it into this...
Image

Is it possible? I'm wanting to take some reclaimed tobacco barns and apply it to this style house :
Image
Image
Image

Is it possible?
If not than what kind of reclaimed lumber would you use?

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:06 am
by phalanx
Sure it's possible. But...

You need a planer to thin the boards to get to the fresh, unweathered wood underneath the gray. The thinning process gives you less wood to work with (structurally), but if you're just using this as sheeting or some kind of modified siding than it shouldn't be a big deal. The big issue is access to a planer, and if you can't get that than using a table saw with a good rip fence would work for boards less than 5" wide.

I do this technique pretty regularly on old 2x4's here in Oregon. Back in "the day," house construction materials consisted almost exclusively of old growth Douglas Fir, which has a beautiful grain pattern and a wonderful golden color. I build furniture and doors out of it, so I can certainly tell you that reclaiming lumber is doable with the right tools.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:16 am
by crypto
skyreep wrote:Out here in North Carolina (Tobacco Country) we have loads of old tobacco barns that are rotting away, some that are built with planking and others that are built with logs. So I'm curious, how can you take old gray barn planking Image

And turn it into this...
Image

Is it possible? I'm wanting to take some reclaimed tobacco barns and apply it to this style house :
Image
Image
Image

Is it possible?
If not than what kind of reclaimed lumber would you use?

Yep, that looks doable. you'll need a planer and a biscuit joiner.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 4:16 pm
by Illini Warrior
no nails, not going to matter what power tool you choose to use ...... nothing wrong with a planer if working on thicker dimension lumber like 2X, 4X, 6X, ect ect ....... for plank work, a triple head wide belt sander is the tool ..... each head with a different grit of paper ..... load it rough (#40 or #60 grit) and finish with a #120 or finer grit ..... can use a single head and make three/four passes also

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 4:37 pm
by Spec
I assume you are not using this for indoor facia. Cured tobacco or curing tobacco may have tainted the wood.

A planer is the best tool. Planing short depths at a time rather then trying to do it in one pass.

I would limit the sanding to final pass. It will be a pain.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 6:06 pm
by TacAir
Cool

My SIL built a shed with OSB, covered with 30 lb tarpaper, then covered with cedar planks salvaged from local fences being torn down.

We just cut the rotted parts at the bottom, then nailed over the tarpaper in a lapstrake pattern. Looks cool, saved a ton of dough and he can claim (at least) part of the shed is "Green"

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 6:11 pm
by jamoni
I have a friend who builds the outbuildings on his farm with salvaged lumber. He'll tear down an old barn for free, haul off the lumber, tin, and whatever else he wants, and burn or otherwise legally dispose of the rest.
Result: two happy farmers, no money spent.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:47 pm
by Crazy Wolf
Spec wrote:I assume you are not using this for indoor facia. Cured tobacco or curing tobacco may have tainted the wood.

A planer is the best tool. Planing short depths at a time rather then trying to do it in one pass.

I would limit the sanding to final pass. It will be a pain.
Hmm, would tobacco-tainted wood be a good choice for the exterior as-is, due to the pesticidal effects that tobacco has? Maybe it'd reduce the risk of termite damage.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Thu Sep 29, 2011 7:02 pm
by m ellis allen
Crazy Wolf wrote:
Spec wrote:I assume you are not using this for indoor facia. Cured tobacco or curing tobacco may have tainted the wood.

A planer is the best tool. Planing short depths at a time rather then trying to do it in one pass.

I would limit the sanding to final pass. It will be a pain.
Hmm, would tobacco-tainted wood be a good choice for the exterior as-is, due to the pesticidal effects that tobacco has? Maybe it'd reduce the risk of termite damage.
or get the termites hopelessly addictied to you house..........

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:32 am
by RoneKiln
Sealing the boards would also seal up any scariness from the tobaco. If you're using it for exterior siding, I don't think it makes a difference. Just finish it with whatever you normally would have.

The greater concern would be breathing the stuff while planing and sanding it. Go get a good filtration mask. The real good ones aren't that expensive and will be worth every penny.

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:48 pm
by run faster
Ive always wanted to do flooring like this :)

Anything is possible, with the right tools!

Re: Reclaimed Lumber Refurbishing?

Posted: Wed Oct 05, 2011 3:11 pm
by southalabama
take a pressure washer to the old wood, it will do wonders and no sawdust.