Home machine shop

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jamoni
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Mon Jan 31, 2011 1:30 pm

Image
Here's my first thread ever.
16 TPI, 3/8" OD.
You can probably see a taper to it. It's pot metal, mostly aluminum, and flexed heavily while cutting. In the future, I'll leave extra stock so I can either use a live center or steady rest to avoid some flex. I also need to work on centering my cutter.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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docdredd
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by docdredd » Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:50 pm

You can thread with out a center but you have to ease up on the cutting pressure.. sometime several passes are required but you can cut out the taper if you go slow and use a sharp bit.
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I dunked a bitch's head in a bucket of ice water one time when she was OD-ing on Xanax. Worked great, but there was a LOT of paperwork afterward. :lol:

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Confucius
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by Confucius » Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:53 pm

I'm having a hard time telling, did you cut a relief beforehand?

I usually use a center while cutting threads, but that's usually in steel, that and take really small cuts.

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jamoni
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:07 pm

Yes, there is a relief, but the nut is threaded up over it. This is to cover the part where the taper gets REAL noticeable. :oops:
Next try is going to be tomorrow, and definitely going to use a center. Also need to grind a new cutter, since the one I used is a bit wide. Still, I learned how to set my change gears and how to set up my slides to feed at the right angles. I'm a-learnin'!
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Confucius
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by Confucius » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:19 pm

jamoni wrote:Yes, there is a relief, but the nut is threaded up over it. This is to cover the part where the taper gets REAL noticeable. :oops:
Next try is going to be tomorrow, and definitely going to use a center. Also need to grind a new cutter, since the one I used is a bit wide. Still, I learned how to set my change gears and how to set up my slides to feed at the right angles. I'm a-learnin'!
Hurr, there's a nut on it. I was tired, totally missed that...

Honestly though, don't cut that long of a thread on something that narrow with that flimsy of metal, that's just asking for a taper. Sure, you can get around it with a center, a cheap die set would do you better for that sort of thing. By all mean, have fun with the lathe, I love cutting threads, but a die cutter would really serve you better.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:39 pm

Yeah, this was mainly for practice. I wanted to see what pitfalls there were, etc etc.
I discovered taper. :)
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by docdredd » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:44 pm

most important size to learn 1/2 x 28 tpi :lol: 8)
SMoAF wrote:

It's always a mistake to confuse general affability with the inability to do harm.


Vicarious_Lee

I dunked a bitch's head in a bucket of ice water one time when she was OD-ing on Xanax. Worked great, but there was a LOT of paperwork afterward. :lol:

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by Confucius » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:47 pm

jamoni wrote:Yeah, this was mainly for practice. I wanted to see what pitfalls there were, etc etc.
I discovered taper. :)
Could be worse, I'm a "volunteer student instructor" for a machining class.
Last quarter someone discovered what happens when you run a carbide thread cutting tool into the chuck on one of the big LeBlonde engine lathes we run. Namely a loud noise, the breaking of the bit, mangling of a chuck jaw, and me making a stream of very loud noises at a bewildered mechanical engineering freshman.

Damn kids will be the death of me...

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docdredd
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by docdredd » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:56 pm

Confucius wrote:
I'm a "volunteer student instructor" for a machining class.

Damn kids will be the death of me...

Is this like being assistant to the assistant manager ? :lol:

Just pulling your chain man
SMoAF wrote:

It's always a mistake to confuse general affability with the inability to do harm.


Vicarious_Lee

I dunked a bitch's head in a bucket of ice water one time when she was OD-ing on Xanax. Worked great, but there was a LOT of paperwork afterward. :lol:

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by Confucius » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:59 pm

docdredd wrote:
Confucius wrote:
I'm a "volunteer student instructor" for a machining class.

Damn kids will be the death of me...

Is this like being assistant to the assistant manager ? :lol:

Just pulling your chain man
Sort of, it's a silly title...

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by That German Guy » Tue Feb 01, 2011 1:15 am

Confucius wrote:Last quarter someone discovered what happens when you run a carbide thread cutting tool into the chuck on one of the big LeBlonde engine lathes we run. Namely a loud noise, the breaking of the bit, mangling of a chuck jaw, and me making a stream of very loud noises at a bewildered mechanical engineering freshman.
Reminds me of my first Epic Lathe Fail (tm).

~~~wavy lines of time~~~
Way back when I was but a wee sprog of 19, I got my first training on lathe and mill, in the shop of this guy a guy I knew knew. He was oldschool, reeeeally oldschool. All that newfangled CNC crap wasn't for him. He put me on the new lathe (the old one had mauled someone, due to the chuck adjustment tool not being spring-loaded, combined with a case of the stupid and the instant-start feature), so there I stood in front of a three-week-old machine, all motivated but also all clueless. He told me the basics, and all was well. I was making airgun parts on the second day.
~~~wavy lines of three day's passing~~~
So I had something that was an irregular shape. Time to take off the collet chuck and put the four-jaw on. Put part in chuck, crank over sled, crank tool into position, press start... BONGGGGGG! The whole shop rang like a fucking bell.

Turns out that the jaws protruded from the chuck, something I was blind to, not having used anything except collet chucks until then. Lathe starts, chuck jaw is slammed into sled, and disaster ensues. The chuck was fine. The sled was fine (except for the notch), but the rails themselves were bent. Luckily I had paid through the nose and every other availibe orifice for insurance that covered gross negligence, I don't think Id have had the 60k Marks, being a poor student and all.
~~~wavy lines of coming-back-to-the-present-ism~~~

I like to believe I learned something. I've certainly not done anything that stupid again. Still, you should feel lucky that I'm not one of your students.
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by MI-1Honkey » Wed Feb 02, 2011 4:44 pm

I don't see the taper in the pic, it looks damn good for a first go!! Like you said, use a center next time, especially for a long thread like that.

I use a fish gauge when I'm setting up for threading. Tool bit should be slightly below center, and mind your rake/relief angle when grinding a tool-bit for aluminum. I use Castrol Moly DEE for threading aluminum.

In which direction are you having trouble centering your cutter?

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Wed Feb 02, 2011 10:41 pm

Not trouble, really. I have one of those cheapy chinese lathes with the 4 way square tool post, and the height is non adjustable. I just need to be less lazy with my shimming, and get it right. I had my cutter a little low, and if I fed it to much the work flex up and over it.
Today I ground a new cutter, and started cutting thread on some old 1.5" OD, 3/16" wall steel tubing. It was a lot easier to cut thread on a large diameter piece, but the ring with my gradations on the cross slide started slipping, so I took it off to drill and tap a hole to put a set screw in it, but my tap broke, luckily with enough sticking out I could remove it, but I still need a new tap.
So tomorrow I'll finish that up, and then move on to some more threading practice.

Also, I've decided my next project is to construct four face plate jaws, to give myself an extra 2" of working length, and to allow me to use the spindle through hole to full potential, and to be able to turn, bore, and face rectangular junk.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Sat Feb 05, 2011 11:16 pm

Gearing up to do some knifemaking once my arm gets better, so today I bought a 14" chop saw and a 3"x36" belt/disc sander from harbor freight. Going to use an old bench grinder to rig up a poor mans grinding machine, so I can do some semi-production runs of a design I want to make.
Basically, I'm going to build a swinging arm, put a mandrel on the end of it to hold a grinding wheel, and put a screw on to adjust the height. Then I'm going to fab up a slide with an auto feed mechanism and a clamping system. I'll use the chopsaw to cut out the blanks, use the belt sander to profile them, then run them through the grinder to clean them up and to cut the main bevels. A little bit of detail work, then each blade will be ready for the heat treater.
Now all I need is someone to pick the damn things up and put them on my bench for me. Stupid arm.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by akraven » Sat Feb 05, 2011 11:44 pm

Jamoni
I will be real interested to see how you set up your knife grinder. Its real tough to do straight true grinds freehand so this should be a big help. Take lots of pic's!

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by meatshieldChris » Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:21 am

I'm late to the party again, but re: flex on things:

My biggest lathe is a Taig 4x9. I have to deal with flex on everything I have to do. Use really really sharp HSS bits (I grind, then hone with a flat diamond sharpening stone), and make sure the last few passes are really light. In the extreme cases I do 3 or 4 more passes with zero infeed. I have a thread cutting attachment for mine, and when cutting threads 2 chasing passes are required practice on that tiny little thing. Use carbide only if the HSS isn't doing the job. I find nice sharp HSS makes accurate life easier. My little guy will give a taper even with the tailstock supporting stuff if I'm too aggressive.

Pulled off a 0.0001" running fit the other day, my most accurate stuff to date. I'm proud like a father if a father could be a father to himself...

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:12 am

akraven wrote:Jamoni
I will be real interested to see how you set up your knife grinder. Its real tough to do straight true grinds freehand so this should be a big help. Take lots of pic's!
It's not THAT hard. :wink:
So today I got my garage cleared out, and got the machine tools moved out there, with the exception of the lathe, which I can't move until I get more arm healing done.
I set up the bench grinder, belt sander, and chopsaw, and did a little knifemaking.
I also fooled around with my newest acquisition:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgkwA_ZRCbA" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I dropped $50 for this thing, and it's my new best friend. Cut through mild steel, annealed O1, and just about anything else I threw at it. It took about an hour to get it squared away and working right. I still have a little work to do timing the lifting pawls.
So, it's coming together! Pics of the new space tomorrow.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Thu Feb 17, 2011 10:47 pm

Put the new saw to work today, cutting angle iron for the grinding machine. Instead of a swinging arm, I have an inclined slide, that the whole bench grinder mounts to. I'll use screws to adjust the height up or down the slide, then a clamp to lock it to the angle iron track it slides in.
The table has the same basic design. It is two horizontal pieces of angle iron used as a track, with a plate that slides forward and back. There is no adjustment for side to side, as this thing will be used exclusively with a custom fixture to hold the work.
For now, the slides will be made of wood, since I want to get this thing up and running, but I will be replacing those with aluminum ones once they are fabricated.
Also, the initial version will be hand fed, but I will be making a power feed for it eventually, so I can set it up, turn it on, and go do some other work. This will let me use a nice slow feed for better results and less heat.
Also, I found out that the O1 steel I'm using is actually pretty machinable, even with my cheesy "mill". This makes me happy. What will make me even happier is to get a real milling machine.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by akraven » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:51 pm

jamoni wrote:
akraven wrote:Jamoni
I will be real interested to see how you set up your knife grinder. Its real tough to do straight true grinds freehand so this should be a big help. Take lots of pic's!
It's not THAT hard. :wink:
I set up the bench grinder, belt sander, and chopsaw, and did a little knifemaking.
I also fooled around with my newest acquisition:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgkwA_ZRCbA" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I dropped $50 for this thing, and it's my new best friend. .
Well I still struggle with getting even grinds. I have a jig I use to help me and that has made a big differience. Definitely not as fine a grinding setup as you are working on though. Will be real interested in seeing that one.
I really like your power saw. You got a heck of a deal on that one. I recently saw one of the local Craigslist and replied but turned out to be a scammer. Oh well.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:53 pm

Here is the new grinding machine, so far. There's still a lot to do, but I think I can get to the point of making some test cuts tomorrow, unless my honey-do list is out of control.
Image
I'm uploading a little video to youtube which I'll link when it's up.
The main things left to do:
1. mount the grinder to the slide
2. make a set of clamps to secure the grinder slide to the track
3. make a screw feed mechanism to adjust the grinder height (this will most likely be put off till I see how the machine works out, as it's not actually necessary)
4. design and make some pads or bearings that will hold the main slide down in the tracks. I'm thinking of using some roller bearings for this
5. design and build a work holding fixture or two that will hold the knives where I want them. Ideally, the grinding wheel would be about 2" lower, so the fixture could be shorter and consequently stiffer, but I think if I make it massive enough, it should be fine. In the future, though, I may work out a way to mount the grinder lower, possibly by removing the base and making a shorter one
6. possibly add a plate across the back of the grinder slide support to stiffen it
7. once all the bugs are worked out, break out some aluminum plate and make better, more rigid slides
8. clean it up, polish the tracks, and paint it
9. Oh, and replace that damn cracked grinding wheel.

So far, this has been a real fun project, and it has the potential to make me some money. It better, because whatever mystery metal those bed rails are made of work hardens, and I broke 4 or 5 drill bits AND a hacksaw blade. Grrr.
Luckily the hardware store had a sale going on Irwin HSS drillbit sets. I got two. :)

EDIT: Here's the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3ufLlF7GJI" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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jamoni
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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:45 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7y1hgvGWMI" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
This thing rocks. There are some definite improvements needed, but the upshot is that I am getting quick accurate grinds, and can gang grind about 15 blades at a time.
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by akraven » Sat Feb 19, 2011 10:27 pm

Looks good so far. How are you planning on grinding along the curve up to the point of a blade?

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by docdredd » Sat Feb 19, 2011 10:40 pm

You need to do this with a belt sander and a flat Platen. Looks great man.
SMoAF wrote:

It's always a mistake to confuse general affability with the inability to do harm.


Vicarious_Lee

I dunked a bitch's head in a bucket of ice water one time when she was OD-ing on Xanax. Worked great, but there was a LOT of paperwork afterward. :lol:

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Re: Home machine shop

Post by jamoni » Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:41 pm

This is for straight edged blades.
The point of the machine is to eventually allow me to automate the grinding of 15 or so simple straight edged blades. I'll just drop them into a fixture, hit "play", and go do more complex benchwork.
I have a belt sander with a platen, and if I could get it to stand there and grind blades by itself, I would. :P
Combined with the power hacksaw, I now have a system that will let me semi-automatically cut out a stack of blanks, then quickly profile and bevel them all at once. It's called mass production. :)
JoergS wrote:Realistically, I think I can launch a nine pound chain saw at 50 fps from a shoulder mounted rubber powered bazooka...
squinty wrote:I reserve the right to yell "Dookyhole!" - or it's Hebrew equivalent if such a thing exists - whilst dispensing a barrage of palm strikes at my opponent.

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