Miracle Plant

Discuss lifestyle changes to better survive disasters. This category is for topics pertaining to being self reliant such as DIY, farming, alternative energy, autonomous solutions to water collection and waste removal, etc.

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Artiz » Tue May 04, 2010 6:04 pm

^^ I would shoot the squirrel first, THEN ask him if he was going to eat my garden.

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by non-descript » Tue May 04, 2010 9:13 pm

A really healthy food you can grow all over the US is figs. Zones 5 or 6 through 9/10. Tons of nutrition http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_fig and are alkalizing. Easy to grow too.
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Hotzcatz » Tue May 11, 2010 1:47 am

There is almost guaranteed to be a moringa tree in the backyard of any older Filipino house and there are quite a few of them sorta around the neighborhood. The leaves taste a lot like mustard leaves when I eat them, but other folks say they taste like mustard. They go good in fish and shrimp soups, or raw on salads. The beans get cooked, too, as well as added to soups. The rabbits also like to eat the leaves and the tree also makes a nice shade tree.

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by vegasguy » Fri Dec 13, 2013 10:18 pm

Would they grow in Las Vegas?

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by ineffableone » Fri Dec 13, 2013 11:53 pm

Not only are these a possible food but medicinal too, not to mention the seeds can be used to purify water! Very cool!!

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For all of us not in tropical environments I did find this http://www.ilovemoringa.com/How-To-Grow ... mates.html but it basically says stick it in a green house in winter.

I have also heard a few sites suggest that you can grow then as annuals. So you would harvest at the end of the summer and replant next year.

There are 13 different varieties of moringa so some might be better suited to indoor growing for us nontropical folks. Or we will be stuck growing them annually or in green houses.
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by fred.greek » Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:09 pm

We are just a bit outside of Yuma, AZ. We have something like 20+ moringa growing, some in the ground, a lot in various containers.

See:

http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/ou ... ringa-book" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Spaghetti Monster » Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:13 pm

I planted one two years ago because of this thread. (I live in Phx AZ). First summer it got to be about 10-15' high. Two winters ago the cold snap I thought killed it, but it came back fine from nothing t0 pushing 20' high 10' diameter at the end of summer. The frost in Dec damaged the tops and edges but with the warmer weather it's coming back fine. The leaves are great in a chicken stock as the add a spicy peppers tasty. I've also made tea from the flowers (bland tasting). I head the long pods are considered quite the delicacy in the Philippians but haven't tried to do anything with them yet. You can also add the leaves to a salad or eat them off the tree as you do yard work.

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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Murphman » Fri Nov 21, 2014 2:25 pm

Thread Necro!

My Moringa tree grew pods this year! Some of the pods have dried, and I picked about 200 seeds that I am going to try and grow out and give to the members of my garden club.

I originally had this tree in a pot. It never got more than 5 feet tall, barely flowered and never once set pods. A year ago, I cut down an old citrus tree and needed something to go there, so I figured, why not try the Moringa. IT HAS THRIVED!!! The 5 foot tree is not a 15 foot tree with a 5 inch trunk. It gave me 20 seed pods so far, and has another 10 on it.

My plan is to coppice the tree about 4 feet off the ground in the middle of January, and try to keep the new growth next year to a manageable size. If I can keep it under 9 feet, that would be ideal. Then I wouldn't need a ladder to pick any pods that grow in the future.

So far, I have only taken a few leaves here and there. Mostly for use in smoothies and soups. I am not really fond of the taste raw or cooked, unless very new growth, so I am going to try and dry some this year to turn into powder. It is more nutritious than spirulina, and doesn't taste as bad. When mixed with any kind of berries in a smoothie, you almost completely lose the taste. WIN!

Anyone else having success with Moringa?
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Halfapint » Fri Nov 21, 2014 3:27 pm

Really wish we could grow them up here in WA but unless you have a greenhouse they just wont do well here. I had been reading about them for sometime would be really cool to have a couple of them. If they could grow naturally here these babies would be AWESOME to plant around and use them as an edible landscape.
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by 91Eunozs » Mon Dec 01, 2014 3:15 pm

Planted a few about 6 months ago and they're growing well here in S. Central Texas...copious watering though. We'll see how they do this winter.
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Anianna » Mon Dec 01, 2014 3:56 pm

propdoc wrote:Can you give us examples of the plants? I for one am always looking for new additions.
I don't know a lot of them, but I would grow turmeric and/or tart cherries to reduce inflammation and tobacco for stings. These are the plants I have used personally and want to always have around. We have lemon balm on the property that I find pleasant to have around and the bees love them. They are in the mint family and you can make a tea of them, but I don't know their medical/nutritional value. I do recommend raising bees. Natural honey is the bomb and has lots of medicinal and nutritional properties.

We also grow sprouts year round for their nutritional content. They're cheap and easy to grow indoors and you don't need any special lights or anything like that. We use an inexpensive sprout tower, but you can use something as simple as a mason jar.
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Crazy Wolf » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:47 pm

Murphman wrote:Thread Necro!

My Moringa tree grew pods this year! Some of the pods have dried, and I picked about 200 seeds that I am going to try and grow out and give to the members of my garden club.

I originally had this tree in a pot. It never got more than 5 feet tall, barely flowered and never once set pods. A year ago, I cut down an old citrus tree and needed something to go there, so I figured, why not try the Moringa. IT HAS THRIVED!!! The 5 foot tree is not a 15 foot tree with a 5 inch trunk. It gave me 20 seed pods so far, and has another 10 on it.

My plan is to coppice the tree about 4 feet off the ground in the middle of January, and try to keep the new growth next year to a manageable size. If I can keep it under 9 feet, that would be ideal. Then I wouldn't need a ladder to pick any pods that grow in the future.

So far, I have only taken a few leaves here and there. Mostly for use in smoothies and soups. I am not really fond of the taste raw or cooked, unless very new growth, so I am going to try and dry some this year to turn into powder. It is more nutritious than spirulina, and doesn't taste as bad. When mixed with any kind of berries in a smoothie, you almost completely lose the taste. WIN!

Anyone else having success with Moringa?
Are they suited to coppicing?
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Re: Miracle Plant

Post by Murphman » Tue Dec 02, 2014 2:17 pm

Crazy Wolf wrote:
Anyone else having success with Moringa?
Are they suited to coppicing?[/quote]

Yes, although I am not doing a traditional coppice at ground level. When the Moringa was potted, I cut it off at about 3 feet high and it came back fine. This year, in the ground, it literally went straight up from that cut to about 15 feet. I will cut it off again about 1/4 of an inch below my first cut, and I expect even more significant growth, but want to cut the main stalk off at 8 feet to get more outward growth, versus a main trunk.

I have even read that the upper green wood can be rooted like willow. I am going to try to take 10" pieces of the green wood and see if they will root when I cut the main trunk off in January. I need to get past my last frost date (1/15) before I cut it off though.

The guy at the farmers market sells 10" starts from seed for $5 a piece. Who knows, maybe this becomes a gun-fund business for me. Between the 200 seeds and probably 20+ cuts I can get for starts (that I could sell for more), maybe I have a little cottage business that nets me a new A/R every year... :clap:
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