Chickens :)

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Cowgirl
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Chickens :)

Post by Cowgirl » Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:44 pm

I had to restart on chickens last year. I ordered day old buff Orpington chicks from a mail order hatchery last summer. I raised them on fermented chicken feed along with kitchen, garden and orchard scraps. They are now full grown, and I got my first egg today.

I like fermenting my feed because it saves money while increasing bird health. Studies show that feeding fermented feed saves about 15% over feeding dry feed. It also reduces the pathogens in the chickens’ guts, increases egg weight, and has other benefits.

I wish I could post photos here, but I have never been able to get that to work.

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Halfapint
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Re: Chickens :)

Post by Halfapint » Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:36 pm

Fermenting their feed is a great idea. I only worry about it going full blown soiled (I was going to say fowl, :awesome: ), how do you make yours?

I hope to have some chickens this year or next.
JeeperCreeper wrote:I like huge dicks, Halfapint, so you are OK in my book.... hahaha
Spazzy wrote:Tell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

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Cowgirl
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Re: Chickens :)

Post by Cowgirl » Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:58 am

Fermenting chicken feed is a great thing - healthier birds, lower feed costs, and super easy to do. Don’t worry about messing up.

I have a gallon jar with a loose fitting decorative lid that I keep on my kitchen countertop. The lid is not tight and so allows gas to escape.

To begin the ferment the first time, I used some of my sourdough starter to give it a quick jumpstart. Using the starter allowed me to begin feeding fermented feed the next day.

But if you don’t have sourdough starter, you can easily harvest the natural yeasts in your air within a few days. Just place the chick feed into the jar and add equal parts water. Cover and let sit for 2 to three days. When colonized, it will smell slightly sour and it will have air pockets, looking a little like cottage cheese. I can never seem to post photos here, but here is my initial chick feed fermentation:

https://ello.co/myrthcowgirl/post/hjn2w ... cnvii8ytxg

Each day I feed as much as they will eat in about 15 to 20 minutes. I keep back a small amount of the fermented feed to start the next day’s ferment. To that I add the feed for the next day and about an equal amount of water (a bit more than an equal amount water is OK, it will just be a little sloppier when you feed the next day - so you don’t need to worry about precision here). I shake or stir it up, cover, and set on the kitchen counter next to my sourdough starter. Here’s a link to my chicken feed fermentation:

https://ello.co/myrthcowgirl/post/shvpl ... dyhnhjkiag

I love chickens. They are the easiest livestock to keep. I had to sell off my sheep and goats a few years ago due to working too many hours off farm. But chickens are easy, low labor - high reward livestock. I hope to get goats again before I retire, but I will never be without chickens.

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