Neighbor Cutting Timber

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Murphman
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Re: Neighbor Cutting Timber

Post by Murphman » Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:44 am

Anianna wrote:I'm not sure I want to stop him if current state laws don't have a problem with it and the issue isn't an aesthetic one as it is literally in the woods and nobody is going to see it save for my family and maybe a hunter that strays too far from where they should be. I want to know if there are ways to protect my trees and my property from damage done on his property. Is there something I can plant or put in place to ensure the structural integrity of the old-growth trees on my property near where he will cut, for example. Should I dam the creek on my property or is there something else I can do to it to protect it from the timber cutting? Is there anything I can do other than let the damage happen and wait for everything to recover or can I help the environment by putting measures in place to help mitigate the damage in the first place?
How close to your property line are the trees you are talking about? Where I am in Florida, if the tree is on both sides of the property line, the tree is literally divided at the property line, meaning a neighbor can shear a tree straight up the property line, even if the main trunk is not on their property. They can also cut out the roots, if the tree can legally be cut down (Florida protects certain species).

Depending upon your local rules, I would focus on the trees nearest the property line and make sure the timber company knows exactly where your property line is and the ramifications of coming onto your property. If you feel very strongly, which it seems you do, I might place a quick single wire fence on my property line with multiple no tresspassing signs on it (posted legally according to your local laws), and take pictures, with a date stamp, of the area pre-cutting. I would also make sure I talked to the foreman of the timber company and let him know how dilligent you are going to be to ensure he doesn;t cross that line.

Since you mentioned you are in the Chesapeake water shed, damnig that creek may get you into all sorts of trouble. Again, check your local ordinances.

Actually, now that I think about it, heavy machinery crossing that creek could be considered a pollutant to the Chesapeake water shed. yYou could look into the as a deterrant, but again, you are picking a fight by doing that.
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Re: Neighbor Cutting Timber

Post by buck85 » Fri Mar 21, 2014 11:10 am

Leave it a lone,the man does not care and a man that does not care is dangerous.The land is very resilient it will heal it self

but if you think you need to do something.I would suggest you do this;
1.Consult with the local environment organizations and if the land is environmentally sensitive they might consider an easement for the land. (it is money or tax credits for leaving your land untouched)
2.In Florida we have a government agency (dep) that manages all of Florida's water (both surface and below ground) If your state has such an agency they maybe able to do some thing.
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Re: Neighbor Cutting Timber

Post by ZombieGranny » Fri Mar 21, 2014 11:21 am

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Last edited by ZombieGranny on Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Neighbor Cutting Timber

Post by DarkAxel » Fri Mar 21, 2014 11:39 am

Is this property above grade or below grade of your property? In other words, does water drain off of his property onto yours or does yours drain onto his? If your property drains onto his, then you shouldn't have much to worry about except for timber theft (cutting your trees), damage (from heavy equipment crossing the property line, trees falling onto your property, tress getting pushed over by heavy equipment), and trespassing. If his land drains onto yours you'll have to worry about soil erosion, mudslides, debris washing onto your property, etc.

As it stands, yeah, it may be his property, but if the loggers on his property fuck up your property, you can force the logging company and the landowner to make it right (They'd be liable for it even after the county takes the property). If you raise enough of a fuss or have a good lawyer, you can even force them to have the property line surveyed and marked before they cut a single tree. Logging companies have to file for permits before they start operations, and those are public records. That's where you can find out whether they are going to clear-cut or not. When my neighbors had their land logged, the company sent a rep out to us to see if we wanted to sell some timber, too.

Either way, I'd get in touch with the logging company and let them know you'll be keeping your eye on them. I don't know of a single logging company that doesn't damage the neighboring property in some way, and they WILL try to get out of paying for it if they can, and some of the the smaller fly-by-night loggers have no qualms about stealing a few high-value trees if they think they can get away with it.
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Re: Neighbor Cutting Timber

Post by Mikeyboy » Fri Mar 21, 2014 12:18 pm

Anianna wrote:I'm not sure I want to stop him if current state laws don't have a problem with it and the issue isn't an aesthetic one as it is literally in the woods and nobody is going to see it save for my family and maybe a hunter that strays too far from where they should be. I want to know if there are ways to protect my trees and my property from damage done on his property. Is there something I can plant or put in place to ensure the structural integrity of the old-growth trees on my property near where he will cut, for example. Should I dam the creek on my property or is there something else I can do to it to protect it from the timber cutting? Is there anything I can do other than let the damage happen and wait for everything to recover or can I help the environment by putting measures in place to help mitigate the damage in the first place?
The VA Dept of Forestry will not stop him outright, but they would help him in reforestation measures, and make the clearing process less impactful on the rest of the forest. I'm not from VA, and I don't know the situation fully, but it could be anything from them making suggestions and having no power over what the guy does, to offering free or paid service (which the landowner may be greatful for), to them laying down the law and saying he can cut down trees but he need to do it like this and take necessary and expensive precautions or get fined.

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