Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

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zombiepreparation
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Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sun Apr 14, 2013 4:01 am

I have 210 sq ft to work with. I am adjacent to five other plots in an apartment building garden. All the plots for the entire life of the garden have been traditional. Neat rows of one kind of plant after another kind of plant. And insect pests. The place is a nursery for insect pests. And heavy water use. And truck loads of purchased compost. As was my 210 sq ft plot until the moment I inherited it last fall.

And I built a 3 X 11 hugelkultur bed. And the fire storm of disapproval began while I was building it. Though it is relatively tidy.

I'm working closely with one of the management people who clearly 'gets' building a sustainable soil growth garden. That person is supporting my extremely different looking 'garden' that doesn't even resemble the gardens around me (or that have ever been here) and passes on the 'updates' and educational information I regularly give on where I am in the process of the direction my plot is taking, as needed to higher management. Even so, I can see I am walking a fine line because I am intentionally not planting this entire season to allow the soil to lay fallow while I haul in, dig, and bury as much bio-matter as I can find in the neighborhood to amend and build soil this entire season. With my bicycle and bike trailer. And this non-planting season coupled with the 'not neat rows of mono-planting' is generating near total confusion and (some) loud disapproval by residents of this large tall apartment building. And I saw I was being examined from a distance a few days ago by the highest management person.

Though what makes it all the more difficult is I am very challenged when it comes to explaining what I'm building and where I'm going with this and why.

And we have severe winds and wind erosion. Unless I use wood chips for mulch I cannot figure out a way, yet, to hold the leaves, grass clippings, and straw mulch in place. And wood chips are unaffordable for me to cover 210 sq ft unless I purchase from the city by the truck bed load, which leads to the next hesitation because the city also adds all the conifer trees to the chips too. Besides the wood chips are a currently moot point anyway as the city sale will not come until much later. In the early summer.

It is my intention to locate a local native ground cover, but discovering the right one and locating seeds is going slowly. So I'm using the cut open leaf bags weighted with rock and limbs to hold it at this time. And no-one likes the look of that.

Plus everything in the plot but the already built hugel bed is still being designed as I learn more about maximizing the catchment of rain, so I am not even yet clear on whether I'm putting in a berm perimeter or swale-like beds as perimeter.

In my favor though; everyone sees how much labor I put into this project. At least that seems to be as universally noticed as the odd gardening I am doing. :clownshoes:

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sun Apr 14, 2013 4:23 am

And drought. We are a regular cyclical drought area. Last year was bad. We had local farm crops fail all around us, city gardens too when we went to triple digit heat for so long. Other towns close by went on water rationing, 'including' outside gardens (though I do not believe the garden part was inforced), and we are still in drought as our water levels are still way too low. Well, actually twice last year in a close by town the water pressure dropped so low and the heat was so high that their pumping station shut down and the city went on 'boil water' briefly.

This is in my favor. The gardening I am adopting would be more likely to survive in drought situations. And this is understood by management. It is still a fine line to walk though as I am on the cutting edge of the publicly observed change in sustainable hugelkultur permaculture. Seriously, these words and principles are not yet even common knowledge to our Master Gardeners here or their Programs. As was evidenced when talking with the on-duty Master Gardener at the County Extension Office last year... Or the Master Gardener with whom I spoke in depth just last weekend. Who had taught a gardening class last weekend. He was not following a lot of what I was saying. It was discouraging.
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FrANkNstEin
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by FrANkNstEin » Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:02 am

Sepp Holzer FTW!

Be carefull with adding Wood Chips/Mulch. At least the Wood mulch we usually get around here is really bark mulch, and while it´s cool to do some landscaping with it, it absolutely sucks in a vegetable garden because something or other in it slows plant growth. (It´s mostly fir bark and as you mention conifere which is related, i guess you already know about that though)

One Thing that would look much better/uniform then These cut open bags for cover, would be to use some sort of used fishnets or camo netting.

maybe talk to RONESURPLUS on here, as a Surplus dealer he might have acces to some cheap ratty ones or even has some bought up in a lot that are not really fit to be sold anymore, but would work well for your application?

It might look way better then the conglomerate of different colored plastic bags blowing in the wind the i envision right now.....

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:08 am

So there will be a lag time, and I'm on the most visible front line. But as permaculture itself is not a discipline but rather a group of core principles which utilizes and takes from all gardening techniques and uses what works best in the dirt, climate, soil content, conditions, and resources available in whatever place one finds one's self gardening, it will finally start being recognized at least in conversation in the next few years.

Permaculture: Gardens that work within the nature of the area in which you are working, huge or tiny.
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:12 am

FrANkNstEin wrote:Sepp Holzer FTW!

Be carefull with adding Wood Chips/Mulch. At least the Wood mulch we usually get around here is really bark mulch, and while it´s cool to do some landscaping with it, it absolutely sucks in a vegetable garden because something or other in it slows plant growth. (It´s mostly fir bark and as you mention conifere which is related, i guess you already know about that though)

One Thing that would look much better/uniform then These cut open bags for cover, would be to use some sort of used fishnets or camo netting.

maybe talk to RONESURPLUS on here, as a Surplus dealer he might have acces to some cheap ratty ones or even has some bought up in a lot that are not really fit to be sold anymore, but would work well for your application?

It might look way better then the conglomerate of different colored plastic bags blowing in the wind the i envision right now.....
I will look into RONESURPLUS.

:D

And thankfully my leaf bags are the giant recyclable heavy paper bags sold now. Not colored plastic blowing in the wind but still, as one neighbor said, unsightly.

zombiepreparation
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:18 am

FrANkNstEin wrote:Sepp Holzer FTW!
Yes. Sepp Holzer!

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:53 pm

Oh geeze! Someone linked this video in All Things Permaculture and it is such a crack-up and sooo related I just had to bring it over here so I wouldn't lose it!

Shit 'Weekend Farmers' Say: "A satirical romp through the lives of wanna-be, urbanite, country weekenders who think they've got what it takes to live the "good life."

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by silversnake » Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:54 pm

If your concern is to cover the mound to prevent wind erosion and your neighbors' concern is that it not look ugly, I'd suggest getting a couple of tarps. Seriously, drop $20 at Home Depot or Lowes or something and get a couple of large tarps. A few bucks more can get you some anchor stakes. Stake the tarps out over the mound. It looks neater, keeps things from disbursing, and prevents neighbors complaining about the "weed patch" that they'll think your ground cover is.

Bonus is that you can use the tarps later for other things too as they're pretty durable and versatile.

good luck and keep us posted with updates and pictures. I'm contemplating something similar in a suburban back yard.

zombiepreparation
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:47 pm

Thank you for that tip, silversnake!

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 6:02 pm

<copying & pasting so I don't lose this information.>
My wife and I just finished planting a hugelkultur, vegetable garden. Tomatoes, Eggplant, a variety of lettuces, dill, oregano, cucumbers,... We tried to do as much companion planting as possible, Tomatoes with Marigolds for example

We started with a 2 ft. deep, 2 ft. wide, 10 ft. long trench. We then lined the bottom with old logs, then mulch then dirt, repeating those layers till we raised it about 2 feet above ground, for a total of 4 feet of composting soil. To hold the above ground layers in place, we used 4 ft. raw wood uprights (branches) every 12 to 18 inches around the trench, and "basket weaved" thin branches between.
Brilliant.

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by 88sport » Mon Apr 15, 2013 7:43 pm

If you don't mind me asking, where are you at in the country? I am down in Georgia and our soils are completely different from other states and even regions within our own state and if I can get an idea of where you're at then myself and possibly others might be able to give more useful information. I gathered that you are in a metropolitan city and are utilizing a community garden, but outside of that and windy description, I have no idea. Even if you have your soil trucked in the composition of that soil needs to be adapted to suit the local climate.
landser wrote:I can practicly hide my self in a contractor bag. fill it full of boughs and leaves you have a bed were it as a poncho. store a dead body in it. put all your gear out of the weather. combine two one with hole and you have a shelters fill it with news paper and you have an insulated shelter. carry water with it.
only here...

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:34 pm

(notes to myself)

How To Make Recycled (and recyclable again after that) Newspaper Pots For Seed Starting
Brilliant.

Information for successful tomato growing

Companion Planting Chart

coppice, coppiced, coppicing: A forest originating mainly from shoots or root suckers. A traditional method of woodland management which takes advantage of the fact that many trees make new growth from the stump or roots if cut down. In a coppiced wood, young tree stems are repeatedly cut down to near ground level. In subsequent growth years, many new shoots will emerge, and, after a number of years the coppiced tree, or stool, is ready to be harvested, and the cycle begins again.pictures, A Kilchoan Diary: Coppicing,

pollarding, pollarded: A pruning system in which the upper branches of a tree are removed, promoting a dense head of foliage and branches. pictures
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:35 pm

(notes to myself)

make notes on green manure
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:45 pm

88sport wrote:If you don't mind me asking, where are you at in the country? I am down in Georgia and our soils are completely different from other states and even regions within our own state and if I can get an idea of where you're at then myself and possibly others might be able to give more useful information. I gathered that you are in a metropolitan city and are utilizing a community garden, but outside of that and windy description, I have no idea. Even if you have your soil trucked in the composition of that soil needs to be adapted to suit the local climate.
Soil trucked in? I'm not following this.
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:01 am

Slugs. Frogs eat slugs?
When we lived in NY, our extensive shade garden with stream was like a slug magnet...

We simply went out every dawn, before leaving for work, and hand tweezered dozens into cups of salt water. Sounds like work, but very effective in our experience.

Do that for a couple weeks, and the slug population is really reduced to almost nil, in that 'area'. Do that a few times a season; good exercise, not as gruesome as it sounds, effective and pretty 'organic'. I found that diatomaceous earth, salt rings, beer platters, etc., were just so-so, fwiw.
Now there was a frog in the garden area last year. I don't know if the slug population there was high or low at that time because the plot had not yet come into my possession. But this begs a permaculture ecology idea: What could I make as a small hospitality area to encourage a frog or two to feel at home in my aprx 14' X 16' plot?

I know bees are important in the food/Earth health connection. And I seem to remember frogs are too? And that they are (were?) were dieing off for some reason and that was alarming the people who know these things.

I have to go google this.
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:08 am

Think like a frog: They need many places to hide from birds, other animals, and to stay moist. Give them as much shelter as possible.
Now I don't know how to proceed with this. We have hawks nesting on the top of our building and I "know" they hunt in the garden area because I have been in the garden when one was perched on the arbor, then swooped down real close to me after something in the garden.

I guess I'll back-burner this idea for now.

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:36 am

<filing this here so I don't lose it> Snails & Slug Management
All land slugs and snails are hermaphrodites, so all have the potential to lay eggs. Adult brown garden snails lay an average of 80 spherical, pearly white eggs (Figure 5) at a time into a hole in the soil. They can lay eggs up to 6 times a year, and it takes about 2 years for snails to mature. Slugs reach maturity after about 3 to 6 months, depending on the species, and lay clear, oval to round eggs in batches of 3 to 40 beneath leaves, in soil cracks, and in other protected areas.

Snails and slugs are most active at night and on cloudy or foggy days. On sunny days they seek hiding places out of the heat and bright light. Often the only clues to their presence are their silvery trails and plant damage. In areas with mild winters, such as southern coastal locations, snails and slugs can be active throughout the year.

During cold weather, snails and slugs hibernate in the topsoil. During hot, dry periods or when it is cold, snails seal themselves off with a parchmentlike membrane and often attach themselves to tree trunks, fences, or walls.

DAMAGE

Snails and slugs feed on a variety of living plants and on decaying plant matter. They chew irregular holes with smooth edges in leaves and flowers and can clip succulent plant parts. They also can chew fruit and young plant bark.

Because they prefer succulent foliage or flowers, they primarily are pests of seedlings and herbaceous plants, but they also are serious pests of ripening fruits that are close to the ground such as strawberries, artichokes, and tomatoes. They also will feed on foliage and fruit of some trees; citrus are especially susceptible to damage. Look for the silvery mucous trails to confirm slugs or snails caused the damage and not earwigs, caterpillars, or other chewing insects.

MANAGEMENT

A good snail and slug management program relies on a combination of methods. The first step is to eliminate, as much as possible, all places where they can hide during the day. Boards, stones, debris, weedy areas around tree trunks, leafy branches growing close to the ground, and dense ground covers such as ivy are ideal sheltering spots. It won’t be possible to eliminate some shelters such as low ledges on fences, the undersides of wooden decks, and water meter boxes, so make a regular practice of trapping and removing snails and slugs from these areas.

Locate vegetable gardens or susceptible plants as far away from snail and slug hiding places as possible. Reducing hiding places allows fewer snails and slugs to survive. The survivors congregate in the remaining shelters, where you can more easily locate and remove them.

Switching from sprinkler irrigation to drip irrigation will reduce humidity and moist surfaces, making the habitat less favorable for these pests. Choose snail-proof plants for areas where snails and slugs are dense. Copper barriers can be useful for protecting especially susceptible plants. Though baits can be part of a management program, it is better to use them in conjunction with other habitat modification, especially in gardens that contain plenty of shelter, food, and moisture.

Plant selection can greatly affect how difficult your battle with snails and slugs will be. Because snails and slugs favor seedlings and plants with succulent foliage you will need to vigilantly protect these. Some plants these pests will seriously damage include basil, beans, cabbage, dahlia, delphinium, hosta, lettuce, marigolds, strawberries, and many other vegetable plants. On the other hand, many plants resist snail and slug damage including begonias, California poppy, fuchias, geraniums, impatiens, lantana, nasturtiums, and purple robe cup flower as well as many plants with stiff leaves and highly scented foliage such as lavender, rosemary, and sage. Most ornamental, woody plants, and ornamental grasses also aren’t seriously affected. If you design your landscape using snail and slug resistant plants, you are likely to have very limited damage.

Handpicking

Handpicking can be very effective if done thoroughly on a regular basis. At first you should look for snails and slugs daily, paying careful attention to potential hiding places. After the population has noticeably declined, a weekly handpicking can be sufficient.

To draw out snails and slugs, water the infested area in the late afternoon. After dark, search them out using a flashlight, pick them up (rubber gloves are handy when slugs are involved), place them in a plastic bag, and dispose of them in the trash. You also can put them in a bucket with soapy water and dispose of them in your compost pile after they are dead. Alternatively, crush captured snails and slugs and leave them in the garden.

Traps

You can trap snails and slugs beneath boards or flower pots that you position throughout the garden and landscape. Inverted melon rinds also make good traps. Construct wooden traps using 12- by 15-inch boards (or any easy-to-handle size) raised off the ground by 1-inch runners. The runners make it easy for the pests to crawl underneath. Scrape off the accumulated snails and slugs daily and destroy them; crushing is the most common method. Don’t use salt to destroy snails and slugs, since it will increase soil salinity.

Some people use beer-baited traps buried at ground level to catch and drown slugs and snails that fall into them. Because it is the fermented part of the product that attracts these pests, you also can use a sugar-water and yeast mixture instead of beer. However, these traps aren’t very effective for the labor involved. Beer traps attract slugs and snails within an area of only a few feet, and you must replenish the bait every few days to keep the level deep enough to drown the mollusks. Traps must have deep, vertical sides to keep the snails and slugs from crawling out and a top to reduce evaporation.
Barriers

Barriers of dry ashes or other abrasives heaped in a band 1 inch high and 3 inches wide around the garden also can be effective. However, these barriers lose their effectiveness after becoming damp, making them difficult to maintain and not very useful in most garden situations.

Natural Enemies

Snails and slugs have many natural enemies including ground beetles, pathogens, snakes, toads, turtles, and birds, but most are rarely effective enough to provide satisfactory control in the garden. One predator found in some California gardens is a large Staphylinid beetle called the devil’s coach horse, Ocypus olens. However, this beetle, which is more than 1-inch long, also will feed on ripening or decaying fruits and vegetables.

Domesticated fowl—such as ducks, geese, or chickens—kept penned in infested areas can be effective snail predators that significantly reduce problems. Be careful, though, as these birds also can eat seedlings.

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:21 pm

note to self: Look at the natural patterns in my little garden. Observe observe observe.

I think I'm only looking. I think I don't yet understand what observe means.

Continuous observation, using all my senses, detect and learn the patterns in my little plot of garden, find the natural cycles

I recognize all those words, I know the meanings of all those words, but something is missing in my grasp of the relevant meaning. And I am not talking anything esoteric, nor do I wish to go there in my thinking. I am not cosmic banana in my thinking, nor to I want to go there. I'm talking basic science related to this piece of 210 or so square feet block of land
within this maybe 1600 square feet block of community garden
within this perhaps 6000 square feet of neighborhood lot
within this lot that houses a multi level apartment building
with-in a small business block
that sets in a reasonably quiet/stable/interesting/diverse neighborhood
within a reasonable size city
within a prairie state
in north america

I see the local climate (patterns with winds, temps, humidity, rainfall, sun/cloudy)
...some of the building effects on the garden area
...the asphalt and auto emissions in the positions around my garden
...insect pests nurtured by adjacent gardeners who do not notice (and will never notice even if pointed out) or find relevant
...the little birds, the owls, the hawks, the rabbits, the crows
...the herbicide applications to the lawn surrounding the community garden within the apartment building lot area
...the conifer trees overhanging my garden plot with the s@#$ load of roots that snake through it
...the neighborhood rich with somewhat diverse trees
...the incline of the community garden
...the mosquito nurseries inadvertently set up by intelligent kind personable neighbors in the community who don't get the connection
...the bats that fly around the apartment feeding on the mosquitoes but certainly not eliminating them

There's more of course that when I look I definitely 'see' but I am reasonably sure I am not necessarily observing.

However, I sat, practicing observing, and 'saw' the wind blowing away the top layers of my garden. I did that, and recognized this wind pattern on the garden, and that the garden needed protection, which lead to immediate artificial ground covering until I can think out and implement a living plant ground covering of native (or close enough) plants that will fit within the criteria the management of this apartment complex will tolerate within their own business guidelines. (btw-- the suggested temporary tarp idea has been turned down by the powers that be. But it was a good idea none the less)

While I'm in this beginning learning phase of sustainable hugelkultur permaculture gardening within the perimeters I'm allowed everything seems so complicated. Well, actually it is complicated while I'm finding all the pieces of this gardening picture and putting them together.

But last growing season when I jumped into gardening, the balcony container garden was amazingly complicated to me, but this year I 'knew' I was still learning that some things are not going to grow on my limited sun concrete walled balcony with temperatures that can reach three digits at times with high humidity. And this year I knew what I would plant that could have a chance, and especially what I would plant in and how many containers I would plant.

So I recognize I'm in a learning... what do you call that... oh yeah, curve. I'm in a learning curve regarding sustainable hugelkultur permaculture soil health water catchment insect pests plant exuded herbacides artificially applied herbicide biomass finding within the limits of the building management education.

I need to think smaller. Observe seems to be that small place. But I don't yet understand how to use my senses to detect and learn the patterns of nature. ( which I fully believe that, at least for now, human conditioned nature and business practice conditioned nature remains a variable in the Nature in which I live)
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 12:56 pm

I was just now wondering what the purpose is in the natural order of things of slugs and snails. I found this:
They help to enrich the soil by eating plant materials and excreting them (although they eat things from the garden too so gardeners hate them!).
So now I'm wondering how to work with this information. Are they actually redundant and/or unnecessary or unbalanced in numbers? Do I need to let them alone and adapt? Do I need to herd them into garden usefulness like the ants do aphids? Do I need to become their major active preditor to balance the population? Is this as simplisitic as just pick as many of them out of the garden itself as I can?

Observe 'seems' important in this snail/slug permanant agriculture question.

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 3:28 pm

It's still cold cloudy & sometimes rainy so I'm not physically working in this new garden. But I have just come from practicing Observing for a little bit until I got too cold to stay.

My first thought on deciding to go out there was to sort of look for slugs/snails to see what I would see.

I lifted wood around the place though found no slugs/snails. Weather too cool for them and they've gone into the soil until it warms again?

But I found lots of tiny worm type things. May be those multi-legged things I've seen on/under logs. Milli-somethings or centi-somethings? And what is their function in my permanent agriculture planning? I need to go google and see what the Internet brings up.

..................................................

I'm pretty sure this is them:
Millipedes

The most common millipedes are dark brown and reach 1 to 1 1/2 inches when full grown. They are round and elongated, with many small legs. When dead or disturbed, they tend to curl into a tight coil.

Millipedes do not bite or pose any danger to humans. They feed on rotting organic matter such as leaves and wood and rarely feed on tender green leaves and roots. They spend almost all their time in moist areas, such as under rocks or logs and in lawn thatch.
.... although I have never noticed over the years that they ever tend to curl into a tight coil when disturbed. My memory of them is they always try to run. But I do like the part about feeding on rotting leaves & wood, rarely feed on tender leaves & roots, and don't bite or pose danger to humans.

My first instinct out in the garden was to get rid of them. Now I think I will stay aware of any changes I might notice with them though other than that basically ignore their presence.

I have wondered about them for years. It's interesting to have perhaps learned a bit about them. People actually have an affinity for studying these and other crawly things. Not me though... except in how they relate to my soil building and permaculture. LOL

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Apr 16, 2013 5:05 pm

hmmm..... Believe that the earth is alive and see how that impacts you this coming week.

Which is a "Gaia" reference to a planet having actual sentience, which I believe must be a somewhat recent real-world idea evolvement of a literary reference to I.Asimov's final book in the long Foundation series with one of my favorite robots, R.Daneel Olivaw. You know, like when Stranger In A Strange Land hit the book shelves and resonated with many readers who then brought "grok" or "to grok" into their vocabulary for a while. Both "grok" & "Gaia" being very worthwhile ideas to at least explore.

Yup. I recently acquired Gaia's Garden which I had immediately recognized the name had a connection to the Asimov book. And at this time G.G. is mostly way too complex for my first week in permanent agriculture kindergarten education to follow. Anyway, the first time I heard of G.G. is around three weeks ago.

Now here's this Pattern language by Christopher Alexander to learn. Ack.

(clearly I'm studying the N.Carolina State Univ on-line semester of Permaculture)

Slowly. New vocabulary to learn. New references to learn and connect. Pomposity to get past to hear what's valuable/useful/accurate/etc. Sometimes the pomposity being my own as I move around decades old and settled information stored in my head to make room for newer and more accurate information, and re-forming of out-of-date thought patterns so I can 'hear'.

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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Fri Apr 19, 2013 7:55 pm

Last edited by zombiepreparation on Mon Apr 22, 2013 12:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

zombiepreparation
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by zombiepreparation » Sat Apr 20, 2013 1:01 pm

Last edited by zombiepreparation on Sat Mar 29, 2014 9:25 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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ZombieGranny
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Re: Virgin Sustainable Hugelkultur Permaculture Gardener

Post by ZombieGranny » Sat Apr 20, 2013 1:12 pm

We kill slugs (used to feed them to the chickens); but the family think snails are cute (those little houses they carry, doncha know) so they get picked off and tossed across the yard into the juniper bushes.
Haven't noticed they do any harm there.
Last edited by ZombieGranny on Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:10 am, edited 2 times in total.
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