Liquid Light Revisited

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by TacAir » Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:58 pm

Is Biff gone forever?
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by berrytim80 » Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:43 am

That’s great. I love the stuff. Thanks, for the review.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Cazo » Mon Feb 06, 2012 11:39 am

I like things that I "believe" will last a life time.

I found this thread while I was hunting for a "High Quality Lantern" I was really close to buying the Petromax. Talk about dodging a bullet.

I ended up buying two kerosene lanterns. Dietz #76 Solid Brass and Feuerhand #276 tin plated. I love the light and the simplicity
I bought the Dietz because it is solid brass so I felt it would last forever unless damaged. I bought the Feuerhand because I found reviews saying it was the best made oil lamp, made in Germany and the claims the globe is heat treated and can handle rain and snow contact without cracking.

My take:
The quiet warm light is a homerun vs. pressure lanterns.
The simplicity is a homerun vs. pressure lanterns
Both still feel thinly constructed with the Feuerhand being slightly better construction. I wish I could find the same design in a heavier gauge material.
The Feuerhand globe is definitely higher quality than the Dietz.

The net of it: I am ordering two more Feuerhands. I’m going to try the painted.

Bonus: I used them as party lights on my patio this weekend and everybody was asking where I got them. They all loved the light they put off and the “look “of the lanterns.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by willo » Sun Apr 29, 2012 1:49 am

I have a Coleman lantern & gas stove but am just a little bit uneasy around pressurised flammables. I guess part of it comes from my dad telling me about catching his face on fire once from a malfunctioning blow torch.

While the kero lanterns produce less light than gasoline lanterns I can think of a few things in their favor from a "hard times" perspective:
They are simpler, and require fewer spare parts.
Wicks are more durable than mantles and possible easier to obtain.
Kerosene may be more easy to obtain and I'd guess would be cheaper.

Slightly off topic, but it seems like a good place to ask this, Does anybody know how to remove the dye from dyed kerosene, as it can clog the wicks.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sun Apr 29, 2012 2:36 am

willo wrote:I have a Coleman lantern & gas stove but am just a little bit uneasy around pressurised flammables. I guess part of it comes from my dad telling me about catching his face on fire once from a malfunctioning blow torch.

While the kero lanterns produce less light than gasoline lanterns I can think of a few things in their favor from a "hard times" perspective:
They are simpler, and require fewer spare parts.
Wicks are more durable than mantles and possible easier to obtain.
Kerosene may be more easy to obtain and I'd guess would be cheaper.

Slightly off topic, but it seems like a good place to ask this, Does anybody know how to remove the dye from dyed kerosene, as it can clog the wicks.
I've never experienced this wick clogging, but then, I seldom buy "lamp oil", as K1 is cheaper in bulk, and easier to store that way. I think that maybe distillation would be the only way outside of a lab to do this, but I've never tried it, and considering the materials, wouldn't. A wick can be made from old rags, rope, or almost anything else- repairing the damage to property or people from a kerosene distillation mishap, not so much. Being a light oil, Kerosene needs to be either atomized, or wicked, in order to light it on fire, under normal circumstances. Heating it up to a boiling point in order to distill the vapors might bring you into "flammable vapors" territory, not to mention be probably more expensive in heating fuel than extra wicks would ever be. If foreign matter content is a real concern, I'd use several coffee filters in a funnel, and slowly filter the suspect oil into a clean container.

Oh, and stop buying the dyed stuff? :lol:
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by 111t » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:07 am

I have noticed that undyed kerosene burns better in my space heaters. Around here some of the gas stations sell dyed and some sell clear. I only buy the clear. Kerosene is an ideal storage fuel due to its cheap cost and lower volatility of the fuel. At any one time I have 4-5 gallons of coleman fuel on hand but at least 20 gallons of kerosene. None of it should be stored in the house but bulk storage of gasoline type fuels is asking for it even out in the shed. Additionally coleman fuelled appliances should not be used indoors. Kerosene appliances are generally much safer just keep a fire extinguisher handy in case of mechanical failures.

I remember clearly a story on another forum where the person was using a coleman suitcase stove outdoors and very suddenly and without warning the generator tube cracked along its entire length. A large fireball resulted. Lickily this took place outdoors with enough time for him to retreat to the house for a fire extinguisher. If it happened indoors...

Carbon monoxide is a factor with both kerosene and coleman fuel that said I've never tripped my detector by burning kerosene pressure stoves indoors. Ventilation is a must.
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sun Apr 29, 2012 4:37 pm

111t wrote:I have noticed that undyed kerosene burns better in my space heaters. Around here some of the gas stations sell dyed and some sell clear. I only buy the clear. Kerosene is an ideal storage fuel due to its cheap cost and lower volatility of the fuel. At any one time I have 4-5 gallons of coleman fuel on hand but at least 20 gallons of kerosene. None of it should be stored in the house but bulk storage of gasoline type fuels is asking for it even out in the shed. Additionally coleman fuelled appliances should not be used indoors. Kerosene appliances are generally much safer just keep a fire extinguisher handy in case of mechanical failures.

I remember clearly a story on another forum where the person was using a coleman suitcase stove outdoors and very suddenly and without warning the generator tube cracked along its entire length. A large fireball resulted. Lickily this took place outdoors with enough time for him to retreat to the house for a fire extinguisher. If it happened indoors...

Carbon monoxide is a factor with both kerosene and coleman fuel that said I've never tripped my detector by burning kerosene pressure stoves indoors. Ventilation is a must.
K1 is the clear stuff, and is regulated, so you can be pretty assured of a consistent quality. The only dependable source I've been able to locate in my area has been the HESS station- for some reason, there are less places handling it now. Be sure you have a YELLOW BLUE container when you pump it- they've gotten to be real sticklers on this. I wouldn't put it past them to call the cops on you as you leave.

edited to correct container color- don't know why I posted that ass-backwards :oops:
Last edited by KnightoftheRoc on Mon Apr 30, 2012 5:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by 111t » Sun Apr 29, 2012 6:11 pm

My containers are blue. I always thought yellow was diesel. Hmmm.
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by willo » Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:56 pm

I have a blue plastic container with the word "Kerosene" molded into it by the manufacturing process; but as to the legalities I wouldn't dare to offer an opinion.

There's a good deal of technical info re lamp & lantern fuels on the W.T. Kirkman website, http://www.lanternnet.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; but they aren't geared towards anything not strictly "off the shelf".

Certainly, if given the choice I'd use clear kero, but worse come to worse the dyed stuff might be the only kind available in one's circumstances and replacing clogged wicks is much simpler than setting up a refinery. I'd guess it might be possible to clean clogged wicks with a lighter solvent and let them dry for reuse.

I've heard of winos straining sterno through bread and teenagers using salt on hand sanitiser (in a purely hypothetical situation, no intent to encourage illegal behavior intended) and I'm no chemist, but I'd think that the dye could be removed by some method short of distillation.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Mon Apr 30, 2012 5:08 am

My mistake, Kerosene IS a blue container- #2 fuel oil is the yellow. Mine is also blue, and I have no idea why I typed yellow for it. My apologies for any confusion.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by 111t » Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:42 pm

The color is a valid point to bring up though as many of the multifuel stoves have confusing non compliant colors. If I had my primus omnifuel and found myself at a gas station that sold kerosene (even dyed kerosene) I would much prefer that to ordinary auto fuel. Yet the msr and primus bottles are red. I suppose I could paint it if I was always running kero, but I traditionally run coleman while backpacking. Very confusing. I've never been in a position to argue it with a clerk though.
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by ElevenBravo » Mon Apr 30, 2012 1:42 pm

Before I saw the pix, I had to google "tubular lantern".... Then I realized you were talking about hurricane lanterns. :mrgreen:
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by williaty » Tue May 01, 2012 1:47 am

Not all things labeled K1 are actually what you want to burn in a lamp or a heater and not all things that are labeled K1 are undyed. Hell, there's undyed kero labeled K1 around here that's STILL nasty crap.
Edited to add: this is because the correct phrasing of the grade is "1-K" but the dealers often realize that people don't really pay attention to that and will sell whatever they feel like as "K1", relying on people's ignorance.

The magic words are "1-K Water Clear". That's really the only thing you want to burn if you can possibly find it. It's worth the (considerable) price premium. It's a very, very pure product with very little in it except the desired hydrocarbons. It'll stink less, smoke less, and will go 5-10x as long before requiring you to burn the wick dry and crunch off the tar. I would also add that it is a good idea to buy this in small cans, such as the 5gal cans from Crown, or go direct to a dealer of bulk fuels who supplies Amish communities. That's the most reliable way to get the highest quality stuff.

With dyed pump kero, you'd need to burn dry the wick and crunch off the tar every 4-5 gallons on something like a 23kBTU convection heater. That's literally every day if you're running it 24/7. Burning it dry is a stinky, smoky, time-consuming process, plus it wastes fuel. So for a couple of hours each day, the heater needs to be outside the house burning dry so you can do maintenance on it. With 1-K Water Clear kero, you can easily get 30-50 gallons through the same heater with less smell/smoke on startup/shutdown plus MUCH less tar in the wick even at the extended cleaning interval.

You should check out Miles Stair's website about heaters. Guy is a certified nutter, even by prepper standards, but has an astonishingly wonderful knowledge of kerosene heaters and lamps.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Tue May 01, 2012 6:43 pm

williaty wrote:You should check out Miles Stair's website about heaters. Guy is a certified nutter, even by prepper standards, but has an astonishingly wonderful knowledge of kerosene heaters and lamps
:lol: :lol: This just goes to show you, that you can learn something from nearly anyone- finding WHAT is the challenge.

Good points raised there on the quality issue. I've had good experience so far with my local Hess station, but I have run into issues with other companies in the past. They weren't big issues, for me, since we were using it as an expedient replacement or supplement to #2 fuel oil, with my plumbing business. Running "K1", no matter how pure on not, through an oil burner, is a good clean alternative to the normal oil- but that has no smoke going into the house unless there's other issues at play.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Xandur » Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:20 pm

I just purchased 2 of these lanterns and a replacement globe. The replacement globe is MUCH lighter and thinner than the other two (18.5oz vs 10oz). I'm not exactly happy about it considering the replacement globes is going to be much easier to break. Of course, I don't plan on breaking them, but in a long term off grid scenario I like as much redundancy as possible. I suspect making the globes thinner and lighter is a cost saving measure by WT Kirkman. I'm told the 18.5 oz globes I received was an error and that they "slipped through quality control" and that "the specification calls for 10 to 12 oz" globes.

I'm curious if anybody has any WT Kirkman #2 lanterns out there and what the weight of their globes are... are they 18.5 oz or 10 oz?

And if they globes are all of a sudden lighter and thinner it begs the questions, if the globes are being made differently to save money, what other shortcuts are being made?

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by FraterLVX » Wed Mar 27, 2013 4:05 am

Xandur wrote:I'm curious if anybody has any WT Kirkman #2 lanterns out there and what the weight of their globes are... are they 18.5 oz or 10 oz?
My #2 Champion, ordered and shipped in April 2009, has a 15.1oz globe and is marked:

Code: Select all

W.T. KIRKMAN
REG'D U.S. PAT. OFF.
This globe feels distinctly overbuilt; I think the 12oz weight would be more fitting. I'd have to hold a 10oz to see what I thought about that.
Xandur wrote: And if they globes are all of a sudden lighter and thinner it begs the questions, if the globes are being made differently to save money, what other shortcuts are being made?
Sounds to me like globe weights are all over the place. I suspect this is partially due to crudeness of globe production and partially changing suppliers. I bet if you emailed Mr. Kirkman he might supply more info.

I don't worry that other bits (other than wick) are altered; wouldn't the machinery have to be reworked to change the basic lantern?

Regardless, I took the opportunity to wash the globe and light the lantern on the porch. Thanks for making me dust it off. I'd been burning a 1940s Dietz recently.
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Resolute » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:09 am

Just found this thread and thought it was awesome.

On topic - I got two lanterns, made by Feuerhand, in the galvanized look. They retail for $30 but bought them for $13 during a sale at Lehman's. They're pretty awesome, nicely robust/overbuilt, and they look great.

Anyone heard of this company or had any experience with them? It looks like they're all made in Germany, and the quality shows.



Also, I've seen some people put the lit wick above the half-dome, and some people put the wick below, barely protruding from the place where the wheel that advances the wick is. I don't know the technical terms. Which wick placement is correct? Should you be able to see it above that dome thing that has a slit in it where you can see the flame, or should it be deeper inside that thing?

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Xandur » Wed Aug 07, 2013 9:09 pm

Good info FraterLVX, thanks for the reply. Maybe you're right, perhaps the globe weights are all over the place due to poor manufacturing practices across the pond.

On another note, one of the two lanterns that are only 6 months old leaked ALL of the fuel out from the crimp at the bottom edge... and it made a BIG mess. These are the same lanterns that are marked "Premium Grade" on WT Kirkman's website. Attempted to email customer service multiple times with no response... guess I'll have to use the fuel tank sealer method in the FAQ, although I can't imagine that should be required for a 6 month old lantern.

I only post this because the original review gives glowing reports on this lantern, but that was nearly 5 years ago. Either the quality control is not what it used to be, or I got a lemon. Either way, be aware you may have some problems with your W.T. Kirkman lantern. YMMV.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Bedsit Bob » Sat Sep 07, 2013 1:59 pm

willo wrote:and I'm no chemist, but I'd think that the dye could be removed by some method short of distillation.
Try filtering it through Fullers Earth or cat litter. :wink:

BTW. The crucial thing to check when buying paraffin (or kerosene as you guys across the pond call it) is that you are buying 124/150 paraffin/kerosene.

That's paraffin/kerosene with a flashpoint between 124 and 150 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by Ocracoke » Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:15 pm

I too like the shorter, rounder look, just for that classic look, but purchased a taller globe for the extra light.

On another subject, any chance of testing this out
http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/kero ... ozraw.aspx

You have to click on the Slide Show to see the 2 diagrams, plus a picture of this device installed.
The author claims of getting a brighter burn because of the air flow created changing the flame,

"The brightness of the old lamp resulted from the width of the flame, rather than from its height or intensity. A comparison of the burner domes provided the answer: A barrel-shaped device—fastened to the inside of the old lamp's dome—caused rising warm air to converge at the top of the burner ... "pressing" the otherwise slender flame into a thin, broad sheet of light."

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by ke6cvh » Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:34 am

I would like to comment on wick trimming, wind resistance and the different Dietz now available (as well as some others). The Dietz original 76 is available in galvanized sub 20 dollars but unfortunately the 78 Mars same model but bigger tank is not to be found except new old stock. I find the Original 76 a really nice lantern but because the smaller tank than the Feuerhand substandard to it. The Feuerhand 276 is also not only available in galvanized only but 100 percent of their lanterns are galvanized even the ones with powder coat colors it is still galvanized underneath. Although the Feuerhand has a thinner globe it is Suprax which is a European version of Pyrex (boro-silicate glass) making it the best globe out of any including the thicker glass ones in my humble opinion. The Feuerhand is the only lantern not made in China (Kirkman premium grade lanterns are made in China but the reflector is in USA). Having looked very carefully there is some subtle differences between the Dietz 76 and the Feuerhand 276 burner in that the 276 is a little taller with a square piece inside of it on the inside bottom giving it superior wind resistance to the 76 in my testing. I have burnt both side by side for hours and I must say that not only is the 276 more wind resistant than the 76, the operation of the wick "buttery smooth" as the Amazon reviewer stated in one review but it also has a consistently more refined flame shape. RE DIetz (it appears to be a Chinese owned company now but they do a good job of hiding that) has a real issue on their Millenium 2000 cooker. Besides the super low quality cookware (one rivet instead of three resulting in the handles coming off and one looking everywhere for them as well as non insulated handles) but more importantly they made a wise improvement to their burner and upgraded from a 5/8 inch wick to an almost 3/4 inch wick to increase cooking btu's. But nowhere does it say this and the "almost 3/4 inch" wick is not listed anywhere on metric sizes (Chinese knock off lanterns usually have 8mm,10mm, 11.2mm, 15mm, and 20mm making the smaller than 1/2 inch lanterns not work properly with the Dietz standard 3/8, 1/2, 5/8, 7/8 sizes and not listing it properly under specs with any kind of warning not to use the english system sized wick). And nobody is selling this mysterious wick anywhere and it is apparently a stealth wick designed like a mission impossible movie so that once it self destructs (is used up) nobody can get another quite like it. However the Chinese clone lanterns taking an 11.2mm wick will typically take a 12.7mm or 1/2 inch wick without issues it is just the other sizes with these problems. The Original 76 is listed by Lehman's as their best seller and I can understand why. I have read and can testify to the high efficiency burners (7/8 inch size) being more prone to wind outdoors in the D-lite and Jupiter 2500 much more so than the smaller and more fuel efficient 276 Feurhand and Original 76 lanterns which get the job done while being super portable and stingy on fuel consumption. I've read one too many a review of the "bronze retro colored" Dietz lanterns developing leaks at the bottom of the fount. My best bet (I've got two coming just to prove it) is that the clear coat that they spray on it breaks down with the kerosene whereas the paint does a good job of sealing up the fount. What I found to be good is to put a bead and smooth it of the two part marine grade epoxy (I've done this on 1/2 dozen cheap Chinese lanterns with 100 percent success rate) which I also do on the seam where the tube enters the fount on the cheaper lanterns. So, to the wick trimming.....we have a garment business here and have industrial electric cloth cutting tools and they always leave a bit of a curved nip at the very end of the cloth which is not a problem in a seam to be sewn. I noticed the same when trimming wicks using even the sharpest of scissors! It is not an issue on the 1/2 inch wicks but a HUGE issue on the 7/8 inch wicks. How to trim perfectly flat? I trim twice. First I get enough of the carbon off to allow me to "nip" the far corner. Then I trim the 2nd and last time but do it so that the cut is even with the nip. I get a perfect 90 degree corner this way. Finally, I trim while the wick is in the burner using the burner itself as a guide for my scissors but offset the scissors a couple degrees downwards when cutting. It is truly an art form trying to get a good cut on those pesky 7/8 inch wicks for the d-lite, Jupiter, and air pilot #8 (a real jewel being the only 7/8 inch rising cone burner!). Just some comments after messing around with virtually every lantern in the line up. From tons of practical testing.....I like my Feuerhand 276, Original 76 and then the Little Wizard no. 1 in that order and if I absolutely must go with a 7/8 inch wick the improved (even better than the Kirkman improved imho) rising cone burner on the Air Pilot no. 8. Yes, the model 80 (and the Kirkman version) are good lanterns but there is a reason why the 76 was built to be the replacement for the official Boy Scout lantern the Dietz Comet. The Comet just was too tiny and just barely not enough light. Something about the 76 makes allot of bang for the buck fuel/wick size in light in my testing. And....the 76 came about because Feuerhand was laying havoc in the US on Dietz with it's 276 so Dietz responded with a copy of the Feuerhand (it is almost identical so I really don't care who was first in the 1800's the 76 is a knock off of the 276 even if Dietz first made the hurricane lantern setup this particular model is almost a mirror copy/image of it). One just needs to spend twice the money for the Feuerhand. Although the official stance is that the 76 came out 2 years late to celebrate the bicentennial These are my observations and opinions to pass on.

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Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by majorhavoc » Tue Aug 28, 2018 10:21 am

ke6cvh wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:34 am
I would like to comment on wick trimming, wind resistance and the different Dietz now available (as well as some others). The Dietz original 76 is available in galvanized sub 20 dollars but unfortunately the 78 Mars same model but bigger tank is not to be found except new old stock. I find the Original 76 a really nice lantern but because the smaller tank than the Feuerhand substandard to it. The Feuerhand 276 is also not only available in galvanized only but 100 percent of their lanterns are galvanized even the ones with powder coat colors it is still galvanized underneath. Although the Feuerhand has a thinner globe it is Suprax which is a European version of Pyrex (boro-silicate glass) making it the best globe out of any including the thicker glass ones in my humble opinion. The Feuerhand is the only lantern not made in China (Kirkman premium grade lanterns are made in China but the reflector is in USA). Having looked very carefully there is some subtle differences between the Dietz 76 and the Feuerhand 276 burner in that the 276 is a little taller with a square piece inside of it on the inside bottom giving it superior wind resistance to the 76 in my testing. I have burnt both side by side for hours and I must say that not only is the 276 more wind resistant than the 76, the operation of the wick "buttery smooth" as the Amazon reviewer stated in one review but it also has a consistently more refined flame shape. RE DIetz (it appears to be a Chinese owned company now but they do a good job of hiding that) has a real issue on their Millenium 2000 cooker. Besides the super low quality cookware (one rivet instead of three resulting in the handles coming off and one looking everywhere for them as well as non insulated handles) but more importantly they made a wise improvement to their burner and upgraded from a 5/8 inch wick to an almost 3/4 inch wick to increase cooking btu's. But nowhere does it say this and the "almost 3/4 inch" wick is not listed anywhere on metric sizes (Chinese knock off lanterns usually have 8mm,10mm, 11.2mm, 15mm, and 20mm making the smaller than 1/2 inch lanterns not work properly with the Dietz standard 3/8, 1/2, 5/8, 7/8 sizes and not listing it properly under specs with any kind of warning not to use the english system sized wick). And nobody is selling this mysterious wick anywhere and it is apparently a stealth wick designed like a mission impossible movie so that once it self destructs (is used up) nobody can get another quite like it. However the Chinese clone lanterns taking an 11.2mm wick will typically take a 12.7mm or 1/2 inch wick without issues it is just the other sizes with these problems. The Original 76 is listed by Lehman's as their best seller and I can understand why. I have read and can testify to the high efficiency burners (7/8 inch size) being more prone to wind outdoors in the D-lite and Jupiter 2500 much more so than the smaller and more fuel efficient 276 Feurhand and Original 76 lanterns which get the job done while being super portable and stingy on fuel consumption. I've read one too many a review of the "bronze retro colored" Dietz lanterns developing leaks at the bottom of the fount. My best bet (I've got two coming just to prove it) is that the clear coat that they spray on it breaks down with the kerosene whereas the paint does a good job of sealing up the fount. What I found to be good is to put a bead and smooth it of the two part marine grade epoxy (I've done this on 1/2 dozen cheap Chinese lanterns with 100 percent success rate) which I also do on the seam where the tube enters the fount on the cheaper lanterns. So, to the wick trimming.....we have a garment business here and have industrial electric cloth cutting tools and they always leave a bit of a curved nip at the very end of the cloth which is not a problem in a seam to be sewn. I noticed the same when trimming wicks using even the sharpest of scissors! It is not an issue on the 1/2 inch wicks but a HUGE issue on the 7/8 inch wicks. How to trim perfectly flat? I trim twice. First I get enough of the carbon off to allow me to "nip" the far corner. Then I trim the 2nd and last time but do it so that the cut is even with the nip. I get a perfect 90 degree corner this way. Finally, I trim while the wick is in the burner using the burner itself as a guide for my scissors but offset the scissors a couple degrees downwards when cutting. It is truly an art form trying to get a good cut on those pesky 7/8 inch wicks for the d-lite, Jupiter, and air pilot #8 (a real jewel being the only 7/8 inch rising cone burner!). Just some comments after messing around with virtually every lantern in the line up. From tons of practical testing.....I like my Feuerhand 276, Original 76 and then the Little Wizard no. 1 in that order and if I absolutely must go with a 7/8 inch wick the improved (even better than the Kirkman improved imho) rising cone burner on the Air Pilot no. 8. Yes, the model 80 (and the Kirkman version) are good lanterns but there is a reason why the 76 was built to be the replacement for the official Boy Scout lantern the Dietz Comet. The Comet just was too tiny and just barely not enough light. Something about the 76 makes allot of bang for the buck fuel/wick size in light in my testing. And....the 76 came about because Feuerhand was laying havoc in the US on Dietz with it's 276 so Dietz responded with a copy of the Feuerhand (it is almost identical so I really don't care who was first in the 1800's the 76 is a knock off of the 276 even if Dietz first made the hurricane lantern setup this particular model is almost a mirror copy/image of it). One just needs to spend twice the money for the Feuerhand. Although the official stance is that the 76 came out 2 years late to celebrate the bicentennial These are my observations and opinions to pass on.
Holy wall of text Batman!

ke6cvh
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:59 am

Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by ke6cvh » Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:40 pm

yeah....the reason why I have so many tubular hurricane lanterns (besides flashlights, guns, lanterns, good tools, etc are cool) is because I'm working up a TEG (thermo electric generator) for a hurricane lantern. It is a tough nut to crack but as they say every once in a while even a blind squirrel finds a nut.

ke6cvh
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:59 am

Re: Liquid Light Revisited

Post by ke6cvh » Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:39 am

forgot to mention a critical point on the Feuerhand 276. They use a tank liner on the inside of all their lanterns (likely not por 15 but still it must be good whatever it is). So, not only is it the only hurricane lantern made in the western hemisphere now in Germany but the tank liner along with all the other positive aspects make it worth the double price. I've got both the black powder coated over galvanized but also the plain galvanized (the top changed to a dull color from the heat which I did not see with the Dietz 76. I am sitting typing with the Dietz original 76 (not the feuerhand original 276) just to give it a chance to be used also. I'm getting ready to test out some camping type heat exchanger cookware with my Dietz Millineium 2000 and also maybe one of the 7/8 inch wick lanterns just to see how it works. Best regards, Mike

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