Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Other provisions not covered above that may make survival easier if your life is tossed out of the norm. This section is for discussing everything from arc welders to underwear.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Thu Dec 18, 2014 1:17 pm

minengr wrote:I own/owned a bunch of watches. My info is probably dated, but the most rugged watch I ever had was a Swiss Army.
I has a version of the Swiss Army similar to this one, which they have been making variations of for years
http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss- ... 00OKYMY5Q/

Seemed rugged, until I caught the strap on something while bartending during college and the pin didn't break. The polymer they used with the casing did and the pin ripped it out on one side. Sucks when your watch still works but you can't put a band on it any more. YMMV

The few Seikos I have had over the years have been extremely reliable for me. I have an expensive Tag that was a gift; the movement on it breaks every so many years--so it ends up costing as much in maintenance as buying a lesser expensive reliable watch. So now I'm trying a Casio G Shock solar. Like it so far. I'll see how it holds up :)
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by moab » Sun May 24, 2015 3:53 pm

For my money it's the Casio Mudman G-9300GB-1.

Image

Technical Specs

Tough Solar Power
Shock Resistant
Mud Resistant
Case & buttons are sealed to prevent mud, dirt and dust from getting into the watch
200M Water Resistant
Digital Compass
Measures and displays direction as one of 16 points
Measuring range: 0 to 359 degrees
Measuring unit: 1 degree
20 seconds continuous measurement
Graphic direction pointer
Bidirectional calibration and northerly calibration function
Magnetic declination correction
Thermometer
Display range: -10 to 60 C (14 to 140 F)
Display unit: 0.1 C (0.2 F)
Moon Data (moon age of specific date, moon phase graph)
Full Auto EL Backlight with Afterglow
World Time
31 time zones (48 cities + UTC), city code display, daylight saving on/off
4 Daily Alarms & 1 Snooze Alarm
Hourly Time Signal
1/100 Second Stopwatch
Measuring capacity: 999:59'59.99"
Measuring modes: Elapsed time, split time, 1st-2nd place times
Countdown Timer
Measuring unit: 1 second
Countdown range: 24 hours
Countdown start time setting range: 1 minute to 24 hours (1-minute increments ans 1-hour increments)
Full Auto Calendar (Pre-programmed until the year 2099)
12/24 Hour Formats
Button operation tone on/off
Accuracy: +/- 15 seconds per month
Storage Battery: Solar Rechargeable Battery
Battery Level Indicator
Power Saving Function
Approx. Battery Life: 8 months on full charge (without further exposure to light)
Module 3281

Size of case/total weight
G9300GB 53.0 x 50.8 x 18.2mm / 68.5g
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by Stercutus » Sun May 24, 2015 4:14 pm

Coho911 wrote:Here's mine,

Casio Pathfinder PAW-1100T

Image
Multi-Band Atomic Timekeeping (US, UK, Germany, Japan)
Receives time calibration radio signals which keep the displayed time accurate
Auto receive function (6 times per day)
Manual receive function
Signal: US WWVB, UK MSF, Germany DCF77, Japan JJY40/JJY60
Frequency: US 60kHz, UK 60kHz, Germany 77.5kHz, Japan 40/60kHz
Tough Solar Power
Digital Compass
16 points of measurement
Measuring range: 0 to 359 degrees
Measuring unit: 1 degree
Altimeter
Measuring range: -700 to 10,000m (-2,300 to 32,800ft)
Measuring unit: 5m (20ft)
Auto memory measurements
Altimeter Memory
Memory capacity: 40 records
Measurement data: altitude, month, date, time
High / Low altitude memory
Cumulative ascent / descent memory
Relative altitude display
Altitude tendency graph
Altitude differential graphic
Altitude alarm
Barometer
Display range: 260 to 1,100 hPa (7.65 to 32.45 inHg)
Display unit: 1 hPa (0.05 inHg)
Atmospheric pressure tendency graph
Atmospheric pressure differential grapic
Thermometer
Display range: -10 to 60 C (14 to 140 F)
Display unit: 0.1 C (0.2 F)
100M Water Resistant
Low Temperature Resistant (-10 C / 14 F)
Full Auto EL Backlight with Afterglow
Duplex LCD
World Time
29 times zones (30 cities), city code display, daylight saving on/off
5 Daily Alarms
Countdown Timer
Measuring unit: 1 second
Countdown range: 1 minute to 60 minutes
Auto-repeat function
1/100 second stopwatch
Measuring capacity: 9:59'59.99"
Measuring modes: Elapsed time, split time, 1st-2nd place times
Hourly Time Signal
Auto Calendar (pre-programmed until the year 2099)
12/24 Hour Formats
Accuracy: ±15 seconds per month (with no signal calibration)
Storage Battery CTL1616
Battery Power Indicator
Power Saving Function
Approx. battery life: 5 months on full charge (without further exposure to light)
Module 3043
Size of case/total weight
62.3 X 52.2 X 14.2mm / 118g
Just wanted to add that I have a version of this watch with an all metal wrist band and case. I have worn it since 2007 without any issues or even changing the battery. The watch is still in excellent condition. It has survived two physically active deployments and plenty of training on top of that. Can't really ask any more of it than that.

Before that I had an earlier version with the plastic case. The case broke at the band mount making it unwearable although the watch still worked.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by coastwatcher42 » Fri Jun 05, 2015 5:07 pm

I love my Seiko SKX173. I recently bought a new one to replace the one that my grandmother bought for me in 1985. I retired it for sentimental reasons, not because it needed to be replaced. Other than replacing the strap every 2-3 years, it has worked perfectly since new. The only real difference that I can tell between my new one and my original one is that the new one is made in Malaysia while the original was made in Japan.

Image

My only complaint is that the dial is phosphorescent and must be exposed to an external light source in order to glow at night. I wish that the dial contained tritium, like the Luminox watches, so as to not require any outside light source in order to glow. Even so, I still prefer the Seiko to the various Luminox watches because I believe it to be a superior and more durable product.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by moab » Fri Oct 09, 2015 7:47 pm

coastwatcher42 wrote:I love my Seiko SKX173. I recently bought a new one to replace the one that my grandmother bought for me in 1985. I retired it for sentimental reasons, not because it needed to be replaced. Other than replacing the strap every 2-3 years, it has worked perfectly since new. The only real difference that I can tell between my new one and my original one is that the new one is made in Malaysia while the original was made in Japan.

Image

My only complaint is that the dial is phosphorescent and must be exposed to an external light source in order to glow at night. I wish that the dial contained tritium, like the Luminox watches, so as to not require any outside light source in order to glow. Even so, I still prefer the Seiko to the various Luminox watches because I believe it to be a superior and more durable product.
I had one of those for years and loved it. Finally dropped it in a running garbage disposal. Destroyed it. lol.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by majorhavoc » Fri Oct 09, 2015 8:03 pm

Well, I put my money where my mouth was earlier in this thread and acquired a Seiko SNK805 automatic watch.

Image

I love the idea of a straightforward, self-winding mechanical watch. I wear it around the clock except when I'm showering (although I've forgotten to take it off a few times and a 15 minute shower seems to do it no harm). So the 30 hour power reserve is never an issue. And the exhibition crystal on the back of the case showing the inner workings is endlessly entertaining. But mine does gain almost 20 seconds a day, which takes some getting used to when the quartz divers I have in my drawer keeps time to within a fraction of a second.

I've read that for these lower range Seiko 5 automatics, it's pretty much luck of the draw in terms of accuracy. Anywhere from a few seconds to a few tens of seconds a day. I guess I got one of the less accurate ones. Still, I dial it back a minute every three days and I'm good to go. Good enough for the apocalypse, as they say.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by 50 Mission Cap » Sat Oct 24, 2015 8:45 am

Not that big a deal to pop the back off and make a little adjustment to the speed. Harbor Freight has a cheap watch back removal tool that works fine. Just make very small adjustments, check it for a few days, and re-adjust.

You should be able to get it within a couple seconds a day. The movement is perfectly good - I'm just guessing at this price point they're not putting any labor into getting it dead nuts at the factory.

Nice watch BTW.

Eric

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by majorhavoc » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:49 am

50 Mission Cap wrote:Not that big a deal to pop the back off and make a little adjustment to the speed. Harbor Freight has a cheap watch back removal tool that works fine. Just make very small adjustments, check it for a few days, and re-adjust.

You should be able to get it within a couple seconds a day. The movement is perfectly good - I'm just guessing at this price point they're not putting any labor into getting it dead nuts at the factory.

Nice watch BTW.

Eric

Too funny, Mission Cap. I literally came home with this just last night:

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and I'm going to revisit the following Youtube video later today.



This is the latest of many crazy mechanical/DIY projects that ZS forum members have enticed me to undertake (building a complete AR carbine from scratch takes the cake). I'll report back how it goes and thanks for the tip. :clap:

I suppose in keeping with the theme of long-term survival off the grid, it's been a basic tenant of mine that unless you're sure a piece of equipment will literally last a lifetime without attention, true preparedness involves the skill to maintain it yourself. I guess I'm adding horology to that skill set.

BTW: welcome to Zombie Squad, and one good turn deserves another: nice choice of motorcycle. :wink:

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:09 am

+1

What everyone else said :)

It's the same movement that Seiko puts in other models. It just happens to be in one of the least expensive models that use it, so you have a good mechanical watch. You can find YouTube videos and other tutorials on how to adjust the regulation.

I ended up getting this watch repair kit about 6 months ago, and it has already paid for itself on changing out a couple of batteries for myself and family, adjusting bracelets, and changing out straps: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F0FT5G0. Good prep to have. You can find the same kits on Ebay for a bit less if you don't mind the slow post from China. It has the tools you need to take the case back off on a variety of watches, including yours.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:11 am

majorhavoc wrote:I suppose in keeping with the theme of long-term survival off the grid, it's been a basic tenant of mine that unless you're sure a piece of equipment will literally last a lifetime without attention, true preparedness involves the skill to maintain it yourself. I guess I'm adding horology to that skill set.
I was surprised how easy it all is, especially since there are YouTube videos on how to do everything.

Well, except I wish I'd started learning years ago when my eyesight was better for close up work. That's been the hardest part: trying to see :lol:
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by Towanda » Sat Oct 24, 2015 4:35 pm

I also have my grandfather's Elgin pocket watch that was made around 1912. It runs just fine and keeps pretty good time.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by MasterMaker » Thu Nov 05, 2015 7:30 pm

If you don't use any of the functions or the light and just use it as a watch then a basic Casio G.Shock will have a battery life of quite a few years, they're cheap so you can buy spares and a stack of replacement batteries don't cost much or take up much space so it would be a simple and cheap way of ensuring that one had a functioning watch for the rest of ones life.

Simple and cheap(but still quality) with several redundancies tend to be a better bet for most things than the one really good option that you can only afford one of as even expensive shit breaks, gets smashed up or is otherwise susceptible to the ministrations of Murphy(fucker hates me for this very reason :crazy: ) , fwiw.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by moab » Thu Nov 05, 2015 7:55 pm

MasterMaker wrote:If you don't use any of the functions or the light and just use it as a watch then a basic Casio G.Shock will have a battery life of quite a few years, they're cheap so you can buy spares and a stack of replacement batteries don't cost much or take up much space so it would be a simple and cheap way of ensuring that one had a functioning watch for the rest of ones life.

Simple and cheap(but still quality) with several redundancies tend to be a better bet for most things than the one really good option that you can only afford one of as even expensive shit breaks, gets smashed up or is otherwise susceptible to the ministrations of Murphy(fucker hates me for this very reason :crazy: ) , fwiw.
I believe a lot of the newer gshocks are solar. So you never need a battery. Mine is anyway. The mudman IIRC.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Thu Nov 05, 2015 7:56 pm

How long do the replacement batteries last in storage, though?

G-Shock makes sense to me for price/durability. But 10 to 15 years into the PAW, having a rarely used automatic in your watch collection could be your go to watch when batteries are all dead. Or a Citizen Eco Drive with a back up capacitor or two. Those things are supposed to last at least 10 years. And from what I have heard, they do not deteriorate from non use unless the capacitors get leaky or otherwise lose the seals (best to verify this). Anyone know what G-Shock uses in their solar watches?
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by williaty » Thu Nov 05, 2015 10:28 pm

moab wrote:I believe a lot of the newer gshocks are solar. So you never need a battery. Mine is anyway. The mudman IIRC.
All the solar powered watches rely on an internal rechargeable battery or capacitor. When it dies, the watch won't work unless in direct sunlight. The lifespan, if you treat the watch to ideal conditions, is about 10 years according to the experiences people are reporting on the watch forums. If you do things it doesn't like, your actual lifespan will be shorter.

raistlin wrote:How long do the replacement batteries last in storage, though?
The lithium and the silver chemistry batteries will last 10-12 years in storage in a cool, dry place.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Thu Nov 05, 2015 10:39 pm

williaty wrote:
moab wrote:I believe a lot of the newer gshocks are solar. So you never need a battery. Mine is anyway. The mudman IIRC.
All the solar powered watches rely on an internal rechargeable battery or capacitor. When it dies, the watch won't work unless in direct sunlight. The lifespan, if you treat the watch to ideal conditions, is about 10 years according to the experiences people are reporting on the watch forums. If you do things it doesn't like, your actual lifespan will be shorter.
Are replacement storage capacitors more long term storage friendly than batteries? The impression I got from reading about them was that they could maybe be stored a lot longer.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by williaty » Thu Nov 05, 2015 10:43 pm

raistlin wrote:
williaty wrote:
moab wrote:I believe a lot of the newer gshocks are solar. So you never need a battery. Mine is anyway. The mudman IIRC.
All the solar powered watches rely on an internal rechargeable battery or capacitor. When it dies, the watch won't work unless in direct sunlight. The lifespan, if you treat the watch to ideal conditions, is about 10 years according to the experiences people are reporting on the watch forums. If you do things it doesn't like, your actual lifespan will be shorter.
Are replacement storage capacitors more long term storage friendly than batteries? The impression I got from reading about them was that they could maybe be stored a lot longer.
I honestly don't know. Modern-produced mass market capacitors have SHITTY lifespans in service but I have no idea about in storage. Of course, given RoHS compliance requirements, you really shouldn't expect anything electronic to work more than ~10 years anymore (unless it happens to be RoHS exempt).

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by moab » Thu Nov 05, 2015 11:59 pm

So we should plan on having self winding watches for the PAW?
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by williaty » Fri Nov 06, 2015 12:21 am

moab wrote:So we should plan on having self winding watches for the PAW?
I think it'd probably be best to treat it as, no matter what type/technology of watch you have, you've only got about 10 years past the last time you have access to a service center to rely on it. The electronic ones will probably stop due to battery issues (supply or exhaustion) at that point. The mechanical ones will just get increasingly less accurate as they go past their service interval. OTOH, you're more at risk for breaking the mechanical watch before it gums up than you would be an electrical watch.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by Doctorr Fabulous » Fri Nov 06, 2015 10:00 am

Accurate time really only became a common thing with the advent of railroads, so I'd question the need for a watch. You'll want to know roughly when it's sunrise, sunset, maybe rough times to go fill the generator or whatever. Learn how the shadows move in your environment and how to estimate time by the sun's position if you're planning on long-term off-grid. Maybe an hourglass or two.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by grumpyviking » Fri Nov 06, 2015 10:05 am

after TSHTF time will be irrelevant, its not like we'll be punching a time clock or anything.
any job will take as long as it takes.
get up just before dawn, at noon the sun is right overhead, and go to bed when its too dark to see by.

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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by Merovech » Fri Nov 06, 2015 10:18 am

majorhavoc wrote:...no one has mentioned the legendary Seiko 5 family...
I have a Seiko 5, you can get one for less than $60 off Amazon and they are great. I have purchased a lot of watches in the 200 to 500$ range and the Seiko 5 is still my favorite and the best.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by doitnstyle1 » Fri Nov 06, 2015 10:51 am

I got the Pyle Sportsmaster:

http://www.amazon.com/Pyle-Sports-Maste ... B006HE7GOG

I bought the one with tactical blackface and I love it. In mountainous regions it's nice to know your altitude without depending or pulling out a gps. It can give me some pretty good weather readings. You just have to make sure you pull it off your wrist or you will get temp and humidity readings affected by your body.

It's an American company. The watch is pretty durable. I have has very little complaints about it. I think the only thing is that the buttons do not have any kind of protection and are triggered by wrist movement. So you may have to press some buttons to get the time as it may not be on the face when you look.
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Re: Watches for long-term survival off the grid

Post by raistlin » Fri Nov 06, 2015 11:42 am

Doctorr Fabulous wrote:Accurate time really only became a common thing with the advent of railroads, so I'd question the need for a watch. You'll want to know roughly when it's sunrise, sunset, maybe rough times to go fill the generator or whatever. Learn how the shadows move in your environment and how to estimate time by the sun's position if you're planning on long-term off-grid. Maybe an hourglass or two.
What sunny warm state do you live in? (lol) Try winter gloom which is the same all day long without any hint of sun. Or what about at night when the stars are not visible? And the further north you go, even when the sun is out, the differences in day length varies so much during the year, that it's not as easy as you make it sound.

Accurate time is definitely a more modern invention. But it is beneficial for coordinating activities with others.
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