Page 3 of 3

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 7:39 pm
by Ufdyixcaff
the sheath back has to be open in that design for the blade to fit that sheath. The toggle + "frog" is actually the "keeper" to keep the blade from falling out of the open back. The cord keeps the toggle handy when you have the blade out.

at least, thats the best assessment I can come up with.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:00 pm
by JoeTosco
Suizen wrote:the sheath back has to be open in that design for the blade to fit that sheath. The toggle + "frog" is actually the "keeper" to keep the blade from falling out of the open back. The cord keeps the toggle handy when you have the blade out.

at least, thats the best assessment I can come up with.
That's right! :D

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 8:26 am
by Fugglesby
Call me biased, as I love those big, bendy buggers, but I think that the vast quantity of the issues that people have with khukuris can be boiled down to improper use, be it poor technique, or just using the wrong khukuri for the job.

Bad technique: Proper khukuri technique is a funny thing, but is often said to be a wrist action called a "snap cut". This involves swinging lazily with the upper arm and then kind of clenching your fist and wrist like cracking a whip but with less energy. Complaints about the knives being incredibly tiring to use, or sending shocks into your arm when chopping or just plain not chopping that well often come from the wrong technique. If you clench the handle tightly and swing a khukuri with a rigid arm, you're gunna have a bad time.
As for the whole handle ring, I personally don't like them and sand them off. I do love the swollen pommel though as it allows you to swing the knife without a tight grip, and then have the butt stop it from flying out of your hand. This means much less effort when chopping and allows for the momentum of the knife to do the work for you. Keep that in mind when being tempted by the westernized handles that many companies offer. These certainly have much higher retention and fill the hand more, but unless the pommel is sufficiently flared you'll be missing out on all a khukuri has to offer.


Right tool for the job: There are a squillion different types of khukuris all intended for a slightly different range of work. If you buy one of the huge 15" choppers with a 10mm thick spine, then expect to be able to cut grass like a machete, you'll be disappointed and it's not the knife's fault. Many complaints about these knives being slow, tiring or heavy come from people only having experience with these massive though admittedly cool looking choppers. If you're looking to buy a knife you can use instead of a medium sized axe, buy one of those. If you're looking for a knife that works as a knife but is also a great fighter and chopper, buy one of the smaller, lighter ones. If you're looking for a khukuri that you can use for chopping, but that's fast and light enough to clear light brush like a machete, buy a sirupate. They're really great.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 8:47 pm
by azrael99
i can't really talk abou the kukri but i sure love the answer of more proper knowing expert

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:54 pm
by ineffableone
Here is a video that helps explain this sort of shaped blade. While this vid is mainly about Kopis, it does include kukri too even using one in demonstration. While not the end all information for kukri it does help explain some for those who don't understand why these blade styles are so popular. I personally have no knife in the fight. I don't own any kukri, though I have considered it a few times, I have yet to own one.


Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 12:58 am
by Paltik
I've liked khukris ever since JEST at Subic. The jungle dweller natives who taught jungle survival used khukri-like blades to do all their chopping, cutting, splitting, etc. It's a very efficient blade against vines (supple organic stuff that likes to yield to blades rather than being severed). It's definitely a tool more than a weapon in the hands of people that use them day to day.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 6:25 am
by Doctorr Fabulous
JTNieman wrote:Why?

This is why:

Image
This, plus the x3 crit on 18-20. Us DEX whores love that crit range.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2013 4:45 pm
by jamesraykenney
fungusmunkey wrote:Wow I post and disappear for a couple of days and this thread takes off.

Thanks for all the replies! I think a couple of posts really got through my thick skull. The jack of all trades post and the cultural differences make a lot of sense to me. I probably am not using the thing as intended but since it was not a tool i was raised with properly that is not shocking.

One thing that surprised me that multiple people mention is digging with a kukri! I was taught to NEVER get any blade you want to retain an edge in the dirt so that is a huge cultural difference. But I can see how carrying one tools beats taking a machete plus a shovel around.
A proper Khukuri will have a softer tip that will bend and not break if you hit a stone... Most heavy chopping is done right behind the big bulge in the blade, but way further than the crook. At the back of the blade, closest to the grip, is where you do woodworking tasks like bark removal or smoothing, by using it as a drawknife.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 5:17 am
by paulsurvivalist
They are built very sturdy, secondly very top heavy. You can beat it, chop, hammer, pry, cut, move through the undergrowth and much more.
I made a review of the CS kukri machete herehttp://survivalknifeguide.net/cold-stee ... te-review/.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 7:37 am
by BullOnParade
paulsurvivalist wrote:They are built very sturdy, secondly very top heavy. You can beat it, chop, hammer, pry, cut, move through the undergrowth and much more.
I made a review of the CS kukri machete herehttp://survivalknifeguide.net/cold-stee ... te-review/.
Thanks for coming by to peddle your wears Paul. If you intend to stick around as a contributing member of our little society, swing by the introduction setcion and tell us a bit about yourself.

It's also nice if you post your review here for us to read, rather than using our humble forum to direct traffic to your website.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 12:37 am
by ednemo
I am too lazy to read all of the posts, so I am not sure if it has been mentioned, but there is a strong cultural use. The people that use it, use it for everything. Everything from shucking corn to building houses. I personally prefer a bowie blade myself but the kukri definitely has its uses. It is too heavy to make a good machete, same as a thick bowie. But if you want to remove the head off of something, you won't find a better tool.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 1:02 am
by azrael99
do you know what brought the kukri love of member of this forum ?

this

Image
Image
Image

was it worth it ? i let you answer that question

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 1:12 am
by maldon007
Afromonk wrote:Yeah i know what a slack belt sander is and most of the time its a adjustment made to a normal belt sander, i was trying to say its not good for keeping convex edges sharp.
its fine to establish one or bring a particularly bad or blunt convex up to par, but not for touch ups or sharpening.

I'm not a kukri fan, but just wanted to throw in my .2 on slack sanders and sharpening. I do all my sharpening on one, from building a blade/shaping the edge to light touch up/weekly sharpening... Works very fast and does a great job BUT does take practice and the right grit. Rougher grits do cut very fast and can remove more metal than needed to just sharpen, I use a fine grit that is pretty much worn out for that. Also a LOT of care is needed near the tip, never run the tip all the way off the belt, really just inside the edge is enough, as the tip cuts quickly having no metal beyond to protect it. And keep it moving.

I strop after sharpening on a bench polishing wheel with stainless polish usually, shaves every time... That from dead dull in 2 min. on a large pocket knife, maybe 5 on a hatchet or bigger knife. Practice on some old kitchen knives first though!!! It will literally kill a blade tip in one second if you fuck up!

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 3:00 am
by KentsOkay
Pop culture and a little time with one at ZS Texas MBO has made me a kukri fan. Ordered up a Vakra from Zombie Tools, can't wait to put it through it's paces.

Anyone know of any fight manuals for these things?

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 3:43 am
by BullOnParade
KentsOkay wrote:Pop culture and a little time with one at ZS Texas MBO has made me a kukri fan. Ordered up a Vakra from Zombie Tools, can't wait to put it through it's paces.

Anyone know of any fight manuals for these things?
Just a quick YouTube search brought back this channel, started watching some, seems semi-basic, but start slow. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast type thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8g_6Fdv ... 1A7395B052" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 5:32 am
by Cherokee John
I'm pretty happy with my Kukri. I use it a lot for cutting bamboo and light timber. Mine wasn't expensive about $40USD. It's Taiwanese made.

[imgImage][/img]]

I've got axes, tomahawks etc. but for bamboo forests/banyan groves the best tools I've used were a folding handsaw, kukri or a billhook. This Kukri has done a lot of work.

Palik mentioned the JEST at Subic in P.I. having Kuris but I remember them having "Bolos" but I could be wrong.

I took these two out into the jungle yesterday for 2 hours and they'll go with me tomorrow. I have a buddy who carves statues and things from driftwood with this same Kukri which I gave him. He had a CS Kukri but liked the heavier weight on this better.

My Kukri sheath was made by a local guy here which I paid for with a carton of smokes and a bottle of rice wine. No joke! ($30 USD?)

Image[/img]]


The billhook sheath I made with an old tube sock and some duct tape. It looks like an umbrella if I'm walking around near civilization with it so it doesn't scare the locals. (I'm embarrassed about my parachord wrap on this one and crappy bolt holder but they both seem to work) These are tools I use a few times every week.

I found that axes, hatchets and tomahawks were too cumbersome going through low brush and steep hills, they got heavy too after a few hours of slapping against my leg or sitting in or strapped on my pack.

They wouldn't look nice on a wall but they are good tools I've used a lot in the terrain I live in. I'm not an expert on anything though I'd just like to share.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2013 11:16 pm
by Fugglesby
+1 to the shuny bee videos, such a great guy and in those few videos he covers a lot, even some non lethal/dual wielding stuff. I will say however, that the techniques shown are very much for your traditional 10" bladed all purpose khukuri, if you start getting significantly longer or heavier than that and you might want to look into techniques relating to shortswords etc. Might make better use fo your extra length as well.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 2:38 am
by KentsOkay
BullOnParade wrote:
KentsOkay wrote:Pop culture and a little time with one at ZS Texas MBO has made me a kukri fan. Ordered up a Vakra from Zombie Tools, can't wait to put it through it's paces.

Anyone know of any fight manuals for these things?
Just a quick YouTube search brought back this channel, started watching some, seems semi-basic, but start slow. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast type thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8g_6Fdv ... 1A7395B052" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Good stuff!

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 11:43 am
by Doryman
I think a lot of their popularity comes from the history and the relative obscurity. It's a cool thing to have.


Personally, I've never owned one, and I likely never will. I live in Canada, and I think that a good axe and buschraft knife are better choices for the environment. Tools are developed and popularized in different places for good reason.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 5:21 pm
by SiegeStove
This reminds me -- I should try and find out what has become of my father's Kukri. He had a nice one with a handcrafted sheath that included a couple of smaller tools (knife and sharpener, I think).
It must be around over 40 years old. Would the age add much to its value?
He unexpectedly passed away two weeks ago and it seems that the people he had been helping to get back on their feet have been up to no good with his credit cards (his accounts drained of all their money, etc.), various things disappeared, etc. It's all overseas so who knows what's still there but it would be nice to get his Kukri and old Colt 45 revolver.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 8:25 pm
by Fugglesby
SiegeStove- If you're looking to get a kukri dated or valued, I STRONGLY suggest trying out the khukuri cantina on knifeforums.com, as they have a huge amount of expertise on the subject and are always keen to help out with such questions.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:09 am
by SiegeStove
Thank you Fugglesby. I don't know if I will ever get it or even if it is still among his possessions, but one can always hope and I'll come back to this post for your tip if I ever do end up with it.

Re: What is with all the Kukri love?

Posted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:17 pm
by Paltik
Cherokee John wrote:Palik mentioned the JEST at Subic in P.I. having Kuris but I remember them having "Bolos" but I could be wrong.
Filipinos call their machetes "bolo" or "boning," but the term isn't really shape-specific. It can apply to something thin and pointy, shorter with a rounded tip, etc. When I saw the bolos used by the trainers at JEST, their shape seemed novel to me. As I looked around, I realized the shape of their bolos was that of a kukri. My guess was that for jungle applications they took a page from the Ghurka book.

I agree that a lot of appreciation for such blades has to do with both environment and culture (how they are used). When my folks went to work in the Philippines I (as a third grader) was required to bring a bolo to school with me each day. Mom was aghast. But I learned to use the darned thing (I can assure you it had a blunt tip) for chopping, whittling, splitting wood or bamboo, cutting grass, and digging in dirt. Those were the days of the "Green Revolution." It feels natural for me to chop, slice, cut, and split with one to this day.