When people find out you're a prepper

Share a survival experience with us and explain what you learned from it. You might help someone.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

User avatar
jnathan
Meat Popsicle
Meat Popsicle
Posts: 1331
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 11:45 am
Location: Illinois, USA

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by jnathan » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:33 pm

This thread reminded me of the first time I met my previous boss. I was living in Michigan at the time and told him I was part of a volunteer organization dedicated to preparedness and volunteering and he asked, "It's not the Michigan Militia, is it?" We both had a good laugh and from that point on it became a little joke between us.

I'm in agreement with the sentiment that says "it's all about how you phrase it." Some people understand that if you live in a area that experiences bad weather, preparing for bad weather makes perfect sense. Other people will never get it, but perhaps that's one of the reasons to volunteer. The chance to change the mind of someone who doesn't think preparedness is important. You might teach them a skill or pass along the mindset that helps them save their own life or someone else's life.

-Jeff
My name is Jeff, not Jonathan. Jonathan would fit...

ZSC:020 Chicagoland | How to search ZS | GHB

Image

Phirce
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 1:08 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the dead, 28 days later, 28 weeks later, zombieland

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Phirce » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:20 pm

I had friends that use to laugh at me and tell me I was over reacting, Till we went on a camping trip. I always carry my bugout bag. This one girl ripped her bikkini top, so I pulled out my sowing kit. Then when it was time to eat they just had bread and hot dog winnies and it wasnt enough for everyone and the kids so I pulled out a can of chili and an onion and a can opener and a can of stew. They asked what I didnt have and I said I had no clue, but if yall would be prepared then this wouldnt have happend. Needless to say they dont laugh anymore.
Stand for something or fall for anything!

User avatar
Vicarious_Lee
* * * * *
Posts: 6650
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 5:21 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 days later, Resident Evil 2, Shaun Of The Dead, Bowling For Columbine, Farenheit 911
Location: Tumblrina City, TX

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Vicarious_Lee » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:29 am

At my new job, they asked me to join some quality improvement "team" Friday. They said Team B needs someone there, and that everyone has to join at least one team. I asked them "So....what am I signing up for?" They said it was for community access and presence, as well as contact with sick clients during disasters and emergencies. Also, the team is responsible for making our facility meet redundancy standards and disaster plan standards.

I slid my ZS ID across the table to them and very briefly explained using the words "nonprofit charity organization" and "preparedness" before saying the phrase "Zombie Squad."

They got so excited they marked me on the board as "ZS", and are thinking of changing Team B's name to "Team Zombie Squad".

Hope that doesn't infringe any copyrights. :D
duodecima wrote:The tinfoil's a clever idea...
Image

Psypher
*
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:46 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: There are so many, so why not list them all!

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Psypher » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:20 pm

Several of my neighbors have already said WTSHTF they'll come a knockin', but they've guaranteed it won't be at 0230 as I tend to greet visitors at that time of day with 12ga slugs in hand and a 45ACP on my hip. One neighbor found that out the hard way after getting robbed in front of his house (highly intoxicated).

I'm a "what do you have to offer us" kind of prepper. If you have nothing to offer outside what we already have then I'll simply tell you to move along.
Safety in numbers? Sure, my spotter says "send it" and we now have dinner for a few weeks. Thank goodness animals don't tend to roam alone.

max v
* *
Posts: 196
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 4:13 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Planet Terror
Location: Lowlands

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by max v » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:09 pm

"You're so paranoid... can I use your lighter?"
Sealegs wrote: Vehicle of choice, horse #1. 1hp multi fuel engine.

User avatar
Nozoki
*
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:37 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Nozoki » Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:16 pm

Phirce wrote:I had friends that use to laugh at me and tell me I was over reacting, Till we went on a camping trip. I always carry my bugout bag. This one girl ripped her bikkini top, so I pulled out my sowing kit. Then when it was time to eat they just had bread and hot dog winnies and it wasnt enough for everyone and the kids so I pulled out a can of chili and an onion and a can opener and a can of stew. They asked what I didnt have and I said I had no clue, but if yall would be prepared then this wouldnt have happend. Needless to say they dont laugh anymore.
I don't like to point out spelling errors, but this was too funny to not mention. Saying you pulled out your "sowing kit" when a girl's bikini top malfunctioned had me rolling.

User avatar
KnightoftheRoc
* * * * *
Posts: 4289
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 1:14 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:48 am

WY_Not wrote:Most people just don't get the concept. Almost two years back back my wife and I went through Dave Ramsey's course. The people in our group completely understood that it made sense to pay off credit cards, get their financil affairs in order, and keep an emergency fund. Yet when we brought up that those same principals could be applied to other aspects of life such as the pantry and household items they just couldn't make that connection. One of the last steps to the course was keeping 3-6 months of cash on hand. When we tried to explain that keeping 3-6 months or even 3-6 weeks of food on hand would make that 3-6 months of cash go even further you would have thought we'd sprouted extra arms, antenna, wings, and were speaking martian.

We were making good progress on our debt snowball and our emergency fund when we were both laid off. It was nearly 8months before I found a job and almost a year for her. That well stocked pantry, and the severence package my wife got, REALLY made a difference. We were able to keep the bills paid and food on the table.
I've been in similar straits myself, so I have an idea what it's like. Out of curiosity, and it might make a stronger argument for you, I'd like to know if you managed this with, or without, assistance from an outside source, like DSS/Welfare, Unemployment, relatives, etc. There's nothing wrong with accepting the help when it's needed, and you qualify for it- Unemployment is an INSURANCE you've already PAID FOR, after all. But, if you were able to keep yourselves afloat with getting involved in some form of outside assistance, I would think that would strengthen your position greatly when talking about it.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

User avatar
KnightoftheRoc
* * * * *
Posts: 4289
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 1:14 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sat Jan 28, 2012 1:27 am

Florida_Tony wrote:
Beanhead wrote:Yeah, but many people wouldn't buy car insurance if they weren't forced to.
For me, it's all about rational risk management.

High Risk & High Probability Situations
These are no-brainers. We MUST prepare for these because they are likely, and devastating. Wearing a seat belt is a good example. The probability is relatively high (compared to getting struck by lightening), and the damage can be severe.

Low Risk & Low Probability Situations
These are also no-brainers. We don't need to worry about them because they probably won't happen, and even if they do, no biggie.

Low Risk & High Probability Situations
These are annoying. Power outages are common in some areas. They don't do much damage, but they are likely, so many choose to prepare.

High Risk & Low Probability Situations
These are the ones that confuse people the most. Fires are not very likely, but holy shit they can be devastating! The same is true of a home defense situation.

When talking to people, I like to find out where they stand on these scenarios. I live in Florida, so I ask if they are prepared for hurricanes. Do they have extra fire extinguishers? Renter's insurance? And so on.

Great thread!
I like this ^^^^

When we moved last February, into a house from an apartment, and ended up with twice the number of people, I sat everyone down for a "family meeting", and had them assign two numbers to each type of disaster I had listed on "worksheets", assessing each disaster on a scale of 1-10, on likelihood, and severity, with a rating for each. While my method may not be entirely scientifically sound, it did serve to get an idea of who perceived what as a severe threat and to get everyone talking about them. We then discussed what we could do for each (many of the listed disasters had identical answers, usually just hunker down and ride it out), what we had to do that with, and what we should work on getting that we did not have yet.

My fiancee and I came into the house with our food preps and assorted household preps, like a FAK, extinguisher, etc., and as a family, we started adding to those. The family dynamic has changed a bit since then, but we still have prep-minded people in the house, all of whom see the benefit to being able to just go to a shelf or closet and KNOW that the item needed is going to be there. We are still developing a "system" that everyone can stick with to assure that we don't run out of toilet paper, for example, but it's coming along.

We're getting a generator as soon as the house ownership is settled (if we end up moving to an apartment, it could be a problem storing it), and then stockpiling kerosene, LP, and gasoline to keep the heat, lights, and cooking operational if/when the utilities go down again. Till then, we are setting aside our money, and expanding on our other preps.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

User avatar
thesupremeking
* * *
Posts: 705
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:49 am
Location: Tucson

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by thesupremeking » Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:38 am

It's not so much what I say, so much as what I won't HAVE to say one day.
Image
Image

User avatar
WY_Not
* * * *
Posts: 866
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 2:52 am
Location: Casstown, Ohio
Contact:

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by WY_Not » Mon Jan 30, 2012 10:52 am

Unemployment only. No other assistance from Fed/State or from family. Family would help if we asked but we were raised such that I'm an adult and I'm responsible for keeping my own house in order. House was in a bit of disarray there for a while but we pulled through.
KnightoftheRoc wrote:I've been in similar straits myself, so I have an idea what it's like. Out of curiosity, and it might make a stronger argument for you, I'd like to know if you managed this with, or without, assistance from an outside source, like DSS/Welfare, Unemployment, relatives, etc. There's nothing wrong with accepting the help when it's needed, and you qualify for it- Unemployment is an INSURANCE you've already PAID FOR, after all. But, if you were able to keep yourselves afloat with getting involved in some form of outside assistance, I would think that would strengthen your position greatly when talking about it.
____________
Joseph aka WY_Not - Founding Member, Chapter Officer
ZSC:029 - North East Ohio Zombie Squad
ZS Fleet # - 0183

User avatar
bigmattdaddywack
* * * * *
Posts: 1607
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2009 4:00 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Zombieland, Shaun of the dead, dawn of the dead, 28 days later,Hide and Creep, Night of the living dead, Undead, Return of the Living Dead.
Not truly zombie movies but, Evil Dead I and II, Army of darkness
Location: St. Louis, Missouri

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by bigmattdaddywack » Mon Jan 30, 2012 11:08 am

subbed
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ejd2rsXoQSI" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grq0rhtbtAw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

User avatar
KnightoftheRoc
* * * * *
Posts: 4289
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 1:14 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Tue Jan 31, 2012 8:11 am

WY_Not wrote:
KnightoftheRoc wrote:I've been in similar straits myself, so I have an idea what it's like. Out of curiosity, and it might make a stronger argument for you, I'd like to know if you managed this with, or without, assistance from an outside source, like DSS/Welfare, Unemployment, relatives, etc. There's nothing wrong with accepting the help when it's needed, and you qualify for it- Unemployment is an INSURANCE you've already PAID FOR, after all. But, if you were able to keep yourselves afloat with getting involved in some form of outside assistance, I would think that would strengthen your position greatly when talking about it.
Unemployment only. No other assistance from Fed/State or from family. Family would help if we asked but we were raised such that I'm an adult and I'm responsible for keeping my own house in order. House was in a bit of disarray there for a while but we pulled through.
I was raised the same way. This does, however, point out a prep that most people, I would be willing to bet, overlook AS a prep.
Working ON the books. Unemployment insurance is a required deduction made by both you and your employer, so it's an easy thing to overlook in a regular budget- you never actually see that money, or hold it in your hand, so it becomes a sort of 'non entity'. But, if you get laid off, fired, downsized, or whatever, and are out of work, this is insurance that LEGALLY EMPLOYED people have already paid for. There's certainly no shame or stigma that should be attached to filing a claim on it. If your insured home or vehicle was to be ruined fire, or a crash), you'd certainly file a claim with that insurance, wouldn't you? Unemployment is no different.

I'm pointing this out as much for myself as for anyone else- being raised to be responsible for myself and mine, and being a personality that is of the mindset "I am what I do", when I find myself in a situation where I'm not doing anything, I have a real problem with it. When I blew out my back, I spent MONTHS doing absolutely nothing. Guess what it made me feel like. That's right- nothing. While I admit it's simply an ego thing, and all in my own head, it's a part of my core personality, and I'm sure I'm not the only person like that. So I, and I think others, too, sometimes need reminding that we EARNED certain things, like unemployment insurance, and it's NOT a handout, or charity.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

HellSpork
* *
Posts: 176
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 12:39 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by HellSpork » Wed Feb 01, 2012 6:25 am

When it comes to prepping, I figure I'm better off not letting ANYONE know about it. Heaven forbid something REALLY bad happens, suddenly someone remembers and word spreads. The only people that know are friends and family we trust and are generally of the same mindset anyway.

It took awhile to get my father on board. He's stubborn as a mule so when we (my brother, mother, and myself) approached him about being prepared for an emergency, his response was, "What? We have guns and a generator. What else do we need?". It didn't dawn on him how little that means even after the generator broke down when we needed it. In fact, he was downright infuriated when he found my brother's stash of stored water a few years ago. He's slowly coming around, so I suppose passive acceptance beats active resistance any day. Since then, "But we have a generator!" has become a running joke in our household.

Usually, when talking to someone who's so damn bottle-fed by society that they feel the need to ridicule the idea of preparation, I try to spin a little paralleled story to walk their mind in the right direction. For instance, I might tell them:

"Say you're going for a hike. You park your car at the trail-head and you're on your way. You've been there before, so you know you have a good cell signal in the area in case something happens. You have no cause for alarm and simply hope to enjoy your walk.
About 1/4 mile down, you come upon a raccoon in the middle of the trail. It's acting strange, and isn't frightened by your approach. How would you respond? Would you (A) try to run past it, and simply hope it doesn't bite? Or (B) would you double back, warn any oncoming hikers you pass, and inform a park ranger or animal control of the likely-rabid animal on a public trail?"

Now anyone who responds with answer (A) is obviously too stupid to learn, so the conversation ends there. Anyone with basic reasoning skills knows (B) is the best course of action because, as the old saying goes, "An ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure." It's better to avoid the rabid animal and prevent your own infection than to hope emergency services is prompt and effective.

Now you've had them establish in their minds that it's better to avoid a potential danger than it is to blindly run into it, you can lead them into the next hypothetical situation of your choosing. When a blizzard hits, would you rather have a few days of ramen noodles on hand? Or hope the grocery store isn't out of necessities when you get there just before the storm, since everyone else in a 10 mile radius is doing the exact same thing?
Usually this will be enough that, even if you don't convince them to prepare themselves, they'll understand YOUR mindset instead of relegating it to tinfoil hat territory.

User avatar
Manovv
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2012 4:22 pm

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Manovv » Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:02 pm

I prefer not to disclose this information. I’m afraid people will look at me like I’ve been listed on those people search sites or something. That tends to aggravate me slightly.

Anyway, better to keep to myself.

ScrappyDood
*
Posts: 96
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 2:23 pm

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by ScrappyDood » Sat Feb 04, 2012 3:07 pm

---
Last edited by ScrappyDood on Sat Jan 09, 2016 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

zombiepreparation
* * * * *
Posts: 1120
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:21 am

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by zombiepreparation » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:54 pm

Shoot, I live in Big Weather country and it is Common Knowledge here that you should have a prepared kit with water, flashlights, shoes at the ready, radio, weather appropriate clothing, snacks, etc. and none, let me repeat, none, of the people I know (who are all from here) do so except when a big warning is in the immediate area. I'm the only one going "Do you have your flashlights? Do you have some water? Do you have a plan?" etc. etc. For years now a couple of the older kids will track where I am during a Big Weather event because I stay aware of what's happening, I always have a plan for me (therefore them too), and I always have a kit with 24 hours of stuff (until last October when I started going 72 hour kit)... but their parents (who btw will call me when they're out of the house to go reassure and get the kids ready), MY friends, who only make little last second "get the flashlight" preps... think I'm amusing. Even though the television this last year has kept pounding us with the 72 hour preparedness commercials. I have one 'acquaintance' who laughs at me and one friend who said it's just to depressing to think about.

So no. I am now telling no-one in real time what I'm doing is prepping for 72 hours min, three months in general, with the goal of a year (to extend if ever I get there to 1 1/2 year) to be able to survive sheltering in place until a long Event begins recovery. I don't believe I'd survive an EOTWAWKI situation anyway so my attention is not in that direction at this time.

But, I'm doing as much self educating/training/prepping for as many aspects of a long Event crisis as I can figure out. Plus slowly attempting to learn enough to come up with a Bug Out plan. I donated my car about five years ago and switched to bicycle power so Bugging Out is not coming together easily at this time. I haven't even begun learning bike repair. Certainly I keep aware, certainly I keep gathering knowledge.

As for other people? I now tell people I'm planning camping trips, and eventually a long camping vacation. This causes no ripple at all in the fabric of my friends and acquaintances I mentioned above. And if I need their empty 2 ltr. soda/large juice bottles for my "camping" preparations (think water storage) they just fork em over with nary a word. And if I want their empty large coffee cans to practice making a "backpacking" stove (think no way to cook or boil water in an Event) they say "No problem". When I (while I'm attempting to get it more compact) carry around a full Get Home Backpack all the time and they ask why, I just say I'm using the weight in the pack as exercise for muscle building for a backpacking trip. That is very reasonable to each of them. Even my EDC to the store or neighborhood walk is explainable: "Well, what if I twisted my ankle or fell off my bike or got hit by a car? I have most things I need to keep me hydrated, snack on, communication, etc etc etc until the medics get here." <said with a big smile> It's worked every time so far.

No more do I say I'm storing for those sometimes week or two long power outages from ice storms and tornadic storms that are common to this area. Or the tornado outbreaks. Or the flooding which can put us in need of one kind or another for weeks. Or the 'boil water' alerts. Or water born illnesses. Or blizzards. Or the building heater/ac stops working, again. Or the pipes break, again. Or the earthquakes that are still minor but have begun to be stronger. No. I won't mention them. Or the nuclear plant that's 60 miles from us. Or sun-flares that knock out power grids. Or H1N1. Nope. Not ever gonna talk about those things again in preparation terms, and probably not in any terms unless someone else brings it up, and I don't think I'll talk prep even then. I'm now close to a reasonably full three month food storage, will soon have availability for a full month of water, am just starting figuring out how to apply biomass storage for months at a time needs; clothing bedding heat cold pandamic avoidance/sanitation bike repair mending entertainment non-electrical lighting laundry medical contact with outside world bug out planning keeping in mind inch planning etc etc etc etc. So far, in my tiny but lovely apartment in my regular neighborhood among all my friends, my food and water stores are hidden/disguised from anyone, including workmen. I learned that lesson roundly and soundly from reading Mom's Journal of the Zombie Years by Kathy in Fl on that thread here in ZS and also her flu pandamic story. I don't have family to speak of and my friends have proven they'd think me nuts. So no talking about it.

I will not talk about it anymore, I will keep it hidden/disguised as long as I'm able, figure out a new explanation if it begins to drift into notice, and continue to hide behind the camping and backpacking explanation which is very well received.
Last edited by zombiepreparation on Fri Feb 10, 2012 2:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
wee drop o' bush
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 5029
Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 7:56 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead
Shaun of the Dead
Dead Set
Zombieland
TV show: The Walking Dead
Game: Plants vs Zombies
Location: Northern Ireland (Deepest, Darkest North Antrim)

When people find out you're a prepper

Post by wee drop o' bush » Tue Feb 07, 2012 6:05 pm

There's not much of a prepping culture in Northern Ireland. I do get strange looks when people find out that I'm a Zombie Squad member. Most have never heard of it.

When I explain the prepping aspect the strange looks increase. Though a few do see the purpose and benefits.
Mr. E. Monkey wrote: Wee drop is NOT a dinosaur with a mind-control hat. Wee drop is NOT a dinosaur with a mind-control hat.
airballrad wrote: All hail Wee Drop, the Angel of Quittin' Time. :D
Image
wee drop's Sheep Farming thread

User avatar
duodecima
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 2951
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2011 1:18 pm

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by duodecima » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:38 pm

wee drop o' bush wrote:There's not much of a prepping culture in Northern Ireland. I do get strange looks when people find out that I'm a Zombie Squad member. Most have never heard of it.

When I explain the prepping aspect the strange looks increase. Though a few do see the purpose and benefits.
Well, pretty much nobody over here that you run into on a day to day basis has heard of ZS either. The idea of having a generator or something so your power doesn't stay out for 2 weeks is considered a nice little extravagance in many rural places tho. Enough food in the pantry in case of snow storms, also not so crazy if you're rural. Food storage and bug out bags, that gets you a bunch of strange looks, too.

[Off Topic]I just did a little geography, and realized that ALL of the island of Ireland is about the same size as Minnesota, and has about as many people. Except Northern Ireland is slightly smaller than St. Louis county - with 6 times as many people. My mind is boggling...)[/Off Topic]
"When someone shows you who they are believe them" M. Angelou

User avatar
wee drop o' bush
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 5029
Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 7:56 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead
Shaun of the Dead
Dead Set
Zombieland
TV show: The Walking Dead
Game: Plants vs Zombies
Location: Northern Ireland (Deepest, Darkest North Antrim)

When people find out you're a prepper

Post by wee drop o' bush » Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:34 am

[off topic] Duo I suddenly feel very small :lol: [off topic]
Mr. E. Monkey wrote: Wee drop is NOT a dinosaur with a mind-control hat. Wee drop is NOT a dinosaur with a mind-control hat.
airballrad wrote: All hail Wee Drop, the Angel of Quittin' Time. :D
Image
wee drop's Sheep Farming thread

User avatar
Tater Raider
* * * * *
Posts: 6737
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:53 pm
Location: Meatworld

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Tater Raider » Fri Feb 10, 2012 1:10 pm

I've dealt with a lot of negative reactions and a lot of positive ones as well. It usually comes up when people see my backpack at the bottom of my stairs, in the dining room.

"What's that?" they ask.

"That's BOB."

Usually there is some confusion. I explain a bug-out bag and then they tend to think I'm nuts. Then I ask them, "So, what's your plan if some faulty wiring causes a fire at 2am?"

"That's not going to happen."

"Really? Just last year I watched 2 houses catch fire. I'd rather have some clothes and some money to get me through a couple days. Snacks are nice to have too, and maybe some water if I'm standing outside watching the thing burn down. I mean after 3 days I'll have some assistance coming in to help me cope, but what about before the assistance kicks in?"

"Um..."

"So if your house burns to the ground at 2am, what do you do? Or a tornado hits Mason instead of Parkersburg? Or we get another flood like '08? You remember going a week without water, right?"

After that I'm either insightful or a loon and honestly I could care less which they consider me. I worry about me and mine - let the other guy fend for himself.

ais4122
* * * * *
Posts: 1016
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 11:38 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later
Location: New York

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by ais4122 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:21 pm

Its not something I go around telling anyone. My preps are for the most part behind locked doors in my basement. So unless I say, Hey I prep, no one would really know. When I do tell someone, who generally Ive know for awhile - never a stranger. I tend to get the reaction- wow, my dad did that back in the 50s, we even had a bomb shelter. Never had a negative response to those I have revealed my prepping too.
Aim small, Miss small
Image

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... =6&t=30558" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Trident
* *
Posts: 227
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:06 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Have not yet decided.
Location: Nor. Calif. State of Jefferson

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Trident » Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:26 pm

I have a cute sky blue back pack that I toss into the back seat of the car I commute in.
It goes with me into the ride share car as well.
My friend who ride with has gotten use to me tossing it in.
I also have an add on 2 day emergency bag that hangs with the classroom emergency bag in my class room.
It was cool to explain to the school psych interns from the local college why I have it after the recent significant quake in our local area.
They were there when the quake struck.
They saw how quickly my students ducked under the tables, got their own packs and lined up quickly and with out fanfare after the quake subsided.
Being prepared is a no brainer.
Knowing to stay calm and collected takes practice.
I do not talk with folks on preparedness unless they open up the topic first.
I always talk in terms of natural disasters.
My co-teacher has caught on and now carries some prep gear in her rig.
Too bad the NG Prep show features the most extreme preppers.
I think the show is a psych ops function of the g o v .
Ow...my tin foil hat is pinching.

User avatar
Carrion Suitcase
*
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:01 am
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by Carrion Suitcase » Mon Mar 12, 2012 1:32 am

ais4122 wrote:Its not something I go around telling anyone. My preps are for the most part behind locked doors in my basement. So unless I say, Hey I prep, no one would really know. When I do tell someone, who generally Ive know for awhile - never a stranger. I tend to get the reaction- wow, my dad did that back in the 50s, we even had a bomb shelter. Never had a negative response to those I have revealed my prepping too.
^ Pretty much this for me too. I think the only people who know I've been compiling a BOB are you guys, my immediate household (brother and girlfriend) and my friend who actually gave me the bag I'm building off of (Abel). I've considered mentioning it just in casual conversation amongst co-workers and the sort...until my girlfriend mentioned wanting one of those "shaky roll" ice cream maker balls REI has for her bag (jokingly). Even amongst the gigantic crowd of their S&D sale, I saw at least 3 people do a double take back at her.

Now, I give some people credit for being smarter than the mainstream, but it kinda feels like whenever prepping is mentioned in the open, most everyone else's brains go right to Doomsday Preppers, which chains to the thought of a coo-coo clock bird dressed in 5.11 gear holding a jerrycan. Sooo...just for craps and grins, we now call her bag her "ice cream bag". Childish perhaps, but it makes trips out for supply ideas/shopping a crapton easier.
Silent Kube wrote:Cats can't chicken out when thrown.

User avatar
jehicks87
* * *
Posts: 389
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 4:40 pm
Location: Ft Campbell, KY
Contact:

Re: When people find out you're a prepper

Post by jehicks87 » Sun Apr 15, 2012 1:41 am

I am pretty open about "prepping" but I'm generally a bit different from my group of friends in the first place, so people don't think it is particularly wider for me. I think there is a happy medium between self deprecating admittance, which many use to defuse the possible backlash, and the self righteous "im a by-god prepper!" Which some take to forcibly defuse the same. Simply being open about it, I have noticed no real negative reactions outside of a rolling of the eyes and a shake of the head, accompanied by a slight chuckle.

For instance, I squirreled away 7 mre's from my latest field problem. When a pilot and my 1sg asked, "are you really packing mre's?" I smiled and said, "help yes. For one, I paid for them and for two, this is gonna help hold me over when the zombies come!" That was that. Ironically, taking this approach has led to quite a few.serious discussions about preparedness both in our regular lives as well as for the next tour downrange. Even with my civilian friends, I have opened one or two minds to the idea of sensible prepping, food water guns and ammo included.

Just don't apologize for it and people will eventually realize you aren't apologizing because you have no reason to, and if you have no reason to apologize... Well then help, maybe there's something to it! :)
My Youtube Channel... please visit, like, and subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/user/JHP762" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
civvie wrote:By purchasing fewer things you can afford better things.
NCO to me: "I'll give you a hint... it rhymes with 'no'."
Me to NCO: "F'sho? It's f'sho, isn't it?"

All I smell is Gin, and Smoke, and Lies...

Post Reply

Return to “Survival Experiences”