Welp . . . the well pump died.

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Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Thor » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:52 pm

Fifteen years in the house and my wife has made fun of me for saying "hey when the zombies come you'll thank me for the preps."

About a few weeks ago we woke up and I went down to make breakfast. I made eggs, sausage, and scrapple. We ate early cause we were going to head out geocacheing around 10am. After breakfast, I took a cup of decafe and sat in front of the TV for a few minutes to catch the news while the wife and daughter were dressing for geocacheing.

Mrs. Thor came down stairs and started filling up the water bottles for our geopack and while I was watching the news I heard her say, "what's wrong with the water?"

I glanced up and said, "Well the filter in the fridge water dispenser is probably shot, fill them from the sink, I'll replace that filter tomorrow." That's what she did. Gravity feed is good.

Then she went to the bathroom and said, "The toilet won't refill".

That caught my attention (and she thinks I don't listen).

I got up and immediately went to check the faucets on the top floor. Nothing there, in fact I heard a sucking sound out of the faucet, water was being sucked down to the lowest level in the house, so nothing available on the top floor, and shortly nothing available on the first floor.

I went to the basement and checked the pressure tank, and the hot water heater, and it was clear. The well pump was dead.

I informed Mrs Thor there would be no more running water until we got the well pump on-line. If you have ever tried to call a well company / plumber on the weekend you'll know how much that costs. It's a mortgage payment at least.

So we were going without running water for at least three days.

It's at this point I slipped into the Zombie Squad mindset. I said "Honey, we have 1,700 gallons of fresh water sitting in the back yard" I grabbed a 5 gallon bucket, dunked it in the pool, came inside and filled the toilet.

That's all it took. My wife and our daughter immediately switched gears and started talking about boiling water and how long it takes to kill germs in boiling water. They both love watching those survival shows on the Discovery Channel and they took it to heart and started to figure out what we needed to survive for three days.

Our daughter said, "we need to go to the store and buy bottled water" I told her "No, we are not going to do that, we are going to deal with our situation with what we have on hand."

So for three days we flushed our toilets and cooked our food with boiled pool water. Finally the well pump got replaced.

Now my wife has told me that we don't have enough stored food, and has said I need to make a water storage system.

LMAO

My job here is done.
Last edited by Thor on Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by psychomajortom » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:00 pm

Total win, Thor. I like how a minor disaster got the family in the mindset to prepare for a bigger one.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by DarkAxel » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:06 pm

As a rural-dwelling, electric well-pump operating, and bucket dropping denizen of East KY, Congrats on your preps and for a job well done (pun intended).

Do you have a hand-dug well, or is your well drilled? Submersible or above ground jet-pump?

If the former, invest in a good rope, latch, and water bucket. If the latter, you can pull the well lines and draw water with a slim-line water-bucket made for such wells (I have had both). Good to know for when the juice goes out long-term or the zeds rise from the dead.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Thor » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:19 pm

darkaxel wrote:As a rural-dwelling, electric well-pump operating, and bucket dropping denizen of East KY, Congrats on your preps and for a job well done (pun intended).

Do you have a hand-dug well, or is your well drilled? Submersible or above ground jet-pump?

If the former, invest in a good rope, latch, and water bucket. If the latter, you can pull the well lines and draw water with a slim-line water-bucket made for such wells (I have had both). Good to know for when the juice goes out long-term or the zeds rise from the dead.
We have a drilled well. About 430 feet, which surprises me since we are less then 3 miles from the Chesapeake Bay, I expected the fresh water table to be higher. It has a submersible pump. I am trying to figure out how to use that well by hand but you most certainly can't sink a bucket in it.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Chef » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:41 pm

Well played, sir. 8)
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by phalanx » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:45 pm

Congrats!

It seems that this is a success story, since you have what you need and your family is on board. What else could you ask for as a basis for long term prepping?
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by dukman » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:58 pm

Did you filter the pool water too? Or does boiling boil off the chlorine? :?
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Chef » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:35 am

Did you filter the pool water too? Or does boiling boil off the chlorine?
Chlorine evaporates pretty fast out of water at room temperature. I'm sure there isn't much left after a boil.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Confucius » Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:43 am

Thor wrote:
darkaxel wrote:As a rural-dwelling, electric well-pump operating, and bucket dropping denizen of East KY, Congrats on your preps and for a job well done (pun intended).

Do you have a hand-dug well, or is your well drilled? Submersible or above ground jet-pump?

If the former, invest in a good rope, latch, and water bucket. If the latter, you can pull the well lines and draw water with a slim-line water-bucket made for such wells (I have had both). Good to know for when the juice goes out long-term or the zeds rise from the dead.
We have a drilled well. About 430 feet, which surprises me since we are less then 3 miles from the Chesapeake Bay, I expected the fresh water table to be higher. It has a submersible pump. I am trying to figure out how to use that well by hand but you most certainly can't sink a bucket in it.
I'm sure there is, it's probably just salty. Do you have storage in line too? Around here it's required, and let me tell you, it's been a life saver a few times. A few weeks ago we had a problem with the controller for our pump, and it would run for about 30 seconds, then die and wait an hour (the controller thought it was cavitating, and we've got a pump saver, so it shuts down for an hour if it senses cavitation). But if the well goes out, we've got a 6,000 gallon buffer before we are in real trouble.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by 1776 » Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:42 pm

Great job on handling what for some people would have been a disaster. When the family has the same prep mindset that you do,it sure makes your job a lot easier. By the way,what the heck is "scrapple"? Edit:Never mind-wiki answered my question. In the south we have hogs head cheese also called souse meat.It sounds similar to scrapple but without the flour and cornmeal.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by airballrad » Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:48 pm

1776 wrote:Great job on handling what for some people would have been a disaster. When the family has the same prep mindset that you do,it sure makes your job a lot easier. By the way,what the heck is "scrapple"? Edit:Never mind-wiki answered my question. In the south we have hogs head cheese also called souse meat.It sounds similar to scrapple but without the flour and cornmeal.
I believe the wiki entry also mentions that scrapple is pure, unadulterated awesomeness. Or at least it should...

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Vicarious_Lee » Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:09 pm

PWNT, dude. Well done.

Also, as another guy whose pool counts as water if SHTF it's nice to see that worked out.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by MacDuff » Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:53 pm

I have a ground well at my house. It was in place when I moved in. It has a electric pump with no storidge tank.
What could I use to bump up the water with no power? also the was has a sulfur smell and leaves white stains on anything it gets on. I use it for my lawn mostly. would boiling be enuf to clean any water? I thought id ask here. Il look it all up also.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Thor » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:05 pm

1776 wrote:Great job on handling what for some people would have been a disaster. When the family has the same prep mindset that you do,it sure makes your job a lot easier. By the way,what the heck is "scrapple"? Edit:Never mind-wiki answered my question. In the south we have hogs head cheese also called souse meat.It sounds similar to scrapple but without the flour and cornmeal.
If you live in the South and don't know what scrapple is, you most certainly didn't "grow up" in the South.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by jclaudii » Wed Sep 22, 2010 4:34 pm

So whats the plan with the well?

a few strong guys, a few slip knots and a few pulleys to make pulling up that much water a tad easier and you got your self a party! If your careful you can re-use your pipe if you don't break it while letting it do it's bend above your heads. You can pick up a submersiable pump at lowes or home depot with around a 10 year warranty...that isn't too bad.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by DarkAxel » Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:40 pm

Thor wrote:
darkaxel wrote:As a rural-dwelling, electric well-pump operating, and bucket dropping denizen of East KY, Congrats on your preps and for a job well done (pun intended).

Do you have a hand-dug well, or is your well drilled? Submersible or above ground jet-pump?

If the former, invest in a good rope, latch, and water bucket. If the latter, you can pull the well lines and draw water with a slim-line water-bucket made for such wells (I have had both). Good to know for when the juice goes out long-term or the zeds rise from the dead.
We have a drilled well. About 430 feet, which surprises me since we are less then 3 miles from the Chesapeake Bay, I expected the fresh water table to be higher. It has a submersible pump. I am trying to figure out how to use that well by hand but you most certainly can't sink a bucket in it.
There are some places that you can get a water-bucket that is slim enough to fit into a drilled well's pipe after you pull the pump and lines. You also might want to look into one of those hand-crank water pumps if you can find a good one.

ETA: My local True Value carries those slim buckets. I'm fairly certain that Lowes or Home Depot doesn't carry them.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by 1776 » Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:55 pm

If you live in the South and don't know what scrapple is, you most certainly didn't "grow up" in the South.[/quote]


Im 35 years old and have lived in GA since I was 11. So yes,I did grow up in the south. I have never heard of scrapple because down here,(at least in this area)it is not called scrapple. Again,its called hogs head cheese or souse meat. If you refer to it as scrapple,the majority of folks here will not know what you are talking about. Its just a regional thing I suppose.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Thor » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:52 pm

Thor wrote:If you live in the South and don't know what scrapple is, you most certainly didn't "grow up" in the South.
1776 wrote: Im 35 years old and have lived in GA since I was 11. So yes,I did grow up in the south. I have never heard of scrapple because down here,(at least in this area)it is not called scrapple. Again,its called hogs head cheese or souse meat. If you refer to it as scrapple,the majority of folks here will not know what you are talking about. Its just a regional thing I suppose.
Yeah your probably right. Here in Maryland, and Virginia it's called Scrapple, up in Pennsylvania its called Pon Haus. But no matter what you call it; it's 100% pure awesome goodness.

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:31 am

darkaxel wrote:
Thor wrote:
darkaxel wrote:As a rural-dwelling, electric well-pump operating, and bucket dropping denizen of East KY, Congrats on your preps and for a job well done (pun intended).

Do you have a hand-dug well, or is your well drilled? Submersible or above ground jet-pump?

If the former, invest in a good rope, latch, and water bucket. If the latter, you can pull the well lines and draw water with a slim-line water-bucket made for such wells (I have had both). Good to know for when the juice goes out long-term or the zeds rise from the dead.
We have a drilled well. About 430 feet, which surprises me since we are less then 3 miles from the Chesapeake Bay, I expected the fresh water table to be higher. It has a submersible pump. I am trying to figure out how to use that well by hand but you most certainly can't sink a bucket in it.
There are some places that you can get a water-bucket that is slim enough to fit into a drilled well's pipe after you pull the pump and lines. You also might want to look into one of those hand-crank water pumps if you can find a good one.

ETA: My local True Value carries those slim buckets. I'm fairly certain that Lowes or Home Depot doesn't carry them.
Well casings for drilled wells are typically a 6 inch inside diameter. Go to Lowe's, and get yourself a 5 foot long length of 4" PVC pipe, a 4" pipe coupling, a 1" check valve in PVC (threaded ends), a 1" pipe bushing in PVC (threaded outside, any inside will work, get as big an inside size as you can), and a PVC 4" pipe cap. You'll want PVC cement, and primer. Be sure to use primer first, this has GOT to stay together. Also, from either the plumbing or electric aisle, buy 6 feet of 1" galvanized pipe (NOT EMT), a galvanized 1"tee, 2 galvanized pipe nipples 6-8 inches long, and a 1" coupling. I'll get to this later. Now, go to the rope aisle, and buy 25 feet MORE than you'll need to get to the depth of your well- the FULL depth, not the depth your well pump sits at. Get the yellow 3/8" stuff, or something that's actually listed for well use- you don't want anything with natural fibers, you want something like vinyl, all synthetic.

Drill a 1-1/4" hole in the center of the pipe cap. Use this hole to install the check valve INSIDE the cap with the pipe bushing- O rings may be needed to make it seal correctly (hardware aisle, in the drawers). Make sure the check valve allows the flow to go INTO the pipe cap when you blow into the bushing. If it does not, turn the valve around. Check it again.
Now. primer the inside of the coupling on one side, and the inside of the cap. Primer the outside of both ends of the 4" pipe. Glue the cap to one end, the coupling to the other. 1 inch down from the end of the coupling, drill a 3/8" hole (to match your rope size) on each side, so you have 2 opposite each other. Set this aside for now where it will stay clean.

Use some paint thinner or gasoline to clean off the threads of the 1" galvanized stuff, and wipe it all dry. Using pipe wrenches, assemble the pipe and nipples into a very tall T assembly, using NO pipe dope or lubricants on the threads- we WANT these to rust together. HAND TIGHTEN the coupling on the end of the long 1" pipe to protect the threads. Set this aside.

Grab some Saran Wrap from the kitchen, some electrician's tape (vinyl), your plumbing projects we just assembled, and head to the well casing with them all. The big T is what you'll use to pull your pump out with. Feel around with it till you find a fitting on the inside of the well casing, usually facing the house. It will have a 1" threaded hole in the top your T handle (minus the coupling- that's for storage) will thread into. Get it threaded in there real good, and pull straight up- it may be difficult, but it will separate. When it does, start hauling your well pump out of the casing. Once the T handle and fitting is clear, wrap the fitting in the Saran Wrap, to keep crud out of your well lines. Remove the rest of the line and the submersible pump. There will be wiring that needs to be disconnected at the top of the well casing, and capped off- don't try to pull the pump with the wiring connected. Fold the wires out of the way. Depending on how deep your well is, you may need extra hands for this stuff- anything over 100 feet, it's a good idea to enlist aid. Do not remove the T handle from this set up, you'll need it to put this back together.

Once the well lines and pump are out, make sure you have enough rope by comparing it to your well line, then tie it really well to the one end of the PVC pipe you built. Tie the other end to the well casing, as an anchor, just in case of an 'oops!'. Anything you drop into the well, you're NOT getting back- keep this in mind as you work. Lower the PVC assembly down inside the casing, till you feel it hit the water. Using a dipping motion, you can now fill the PVC tube with water, and haul it up once you think it's full enough. Once you pull it free, you just pour the water out the top of the assembly.

This will allow you to draw water when you have no working well pump. Replacing the well pump can now also be done, if needed, just replicate the set up you are taking apart. When lowering the well pump back in, be sure to keep the line and pump clean of things like grass clippings, dog poo, dirt, etc- you don't want anything getting into your water that could cause trouble later- which is why you want a synthetic rope. Once you are back up and running again, you can store the rope by wrapping it around the PVC pipe, and storing it with the check valve end up, to prevent accumulating crud inside the tube.

I've pulled hundreds of wells, and I've never had a problem with this set up. The Tee handle had a permanent home in the van, and was worth it's weight in gold- you might want to get fancy, and put caps on the handle part, but it's not required. Also, if you want to, there are rental units available for pulling well pumps, and the Tee handle can be used with them, no problem. they have 3 pneumatic tires that grab the line and squeeze it, keeping it from falling, and they can lift quite a bit of weight. The on/off also allows you time to clean off lines as you re-install, without having to have your brother in law standing there holding it all the while. If anyone wants, feel free to PM me about this, and I'll try to clarify a bit more if needed.
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by 1776 » Fri Sep 24, 2010 1:02 pm

Yeah your probably right. Here in Maryland, and Virginia it's called Scrapple, up in Pennsylvania its called Pon Haus. But no matter what you call it; it's 100% pure awesome goodness.[/quote]



Absolutely.The mother of one of my best friends makes the most awsome souse meat you've ever had. Spread on crackers and with some beer to wash it down-it don't get much better than that. I think I might give him a call and see if he's got any.....
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by DarkAxel » Fri Sep 24, 2010 3:25 pm

KnightoftheRoc wrote:A really awesome post that needs to be saved for posterity.
Excellent idea! Those of yo with drilled wells and submersible pumps take note!
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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by Thor » Fri Sep 24, 2010 9:07 pm

Thor wrote:Yeah your probably right. Here in Maryland, and Virginia it's called Scrapple, up in Pennsylvania its called Pon Haus. But no matter what you call it; it's 100% pure awesome goodness.
1776 wrote:Absolutely.The mother of one of my best friends makes the most awsome souse meat you've ever had. Spread on crackers and with some beer to wash it down-it don't get much better than that. I think I might give him a call and see if he's got any.....
See this make me wonder if we are talking about the same thing. Uncooked scrapple is way too thick to use as a spread on crackers. I am thinking souse meat is something different. Scrapple is dense and should be cooked before eating.

I'll post a pic of Scrapple uncooked and cooked.

Uncooked:
Image

Cooked:
Image

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Re: Welp . . . the well pump died.

Post by 1776 » Sat Sep 25, 2010 10:20 pm

Thor wrote:
Thor wrote:Yeah your probably right. Here in Maryland, and Virginia it's called Scrapple, up in Pennsylvania its called Pon Haus. But no matter what you call it; it's 100% pure awesome goodness.
1776 wrote:Absolutely.The mother of one of my best friends makes the most awsome souse meat you've ever had. Spread on crackers and with some beer to wash it down-it don't get much better than that. I think I might give him a call and see if he's got any.....
See this make me wonder if we are talking about the same thing. Uncooked scrapple is way too thick to use as a spread on crackers. I am thinking souse meat is something different. Scrapple is dense and should be cooked before eating.


Well, spread was a poor choice of words. What I meant was sliced into small pieces and placed on crackers. Basicaly,the head and hooves of the pig(or cow,I prefer pork) is boiled down,so it is cooked. The meat is then added to other indgredients,along with vinager and the spices of your choosing.Its then placed in a loaf pan and placed in the fridge to gel.My friends mom also adds a pack of gelentin to help with this process. Once gelled you can slice it and make sandwhiches,serve it on crackers,it is also popular as a breakfast meal,served with eggs.There is no flour or cornmeal added. Sounds like the same meat,but prepared different. I guess the biggest difference is no flour or cornmeal,and its served cold.
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