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Well I won't be getting into the Nursing program this year.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:42 am
by SharkChild
Well I won't be getting into the Nursing program this year. Kind of down in the dumps. I will have to wait till next year. But I will get in next year.

I am missing one class which is statistics. There was a miscommunication on my part. I though it could be waviered, by this I mean I could take it when I am in the program, but I can't. So by the end of this semester I should havea 3.4gpa. I will take a few classes next semester to pick it up to a 3.6 or 3.7. Well wish me luck next year.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:46 am
by Ben
Good luck. Are there any classes in the nursing program that you can take now? I know when I was in nursing school I had to take Public Speaking and since I was off a semester I was able to take A&P and Pharmacology so it wasn't all just wasted time.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:55 am
by SharkChild
I have all my sciences taken care of... Right now I am taking microbiology. But I am going to take statistics. And A&P II just to refresh my memory it has been a good while since I took it, and I might take chemisty II. I have already taken speech which is public speaking.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:13 am
by Ben
I still don't understand why you need speech to be a nurse but I guess it is up there with Stats. LOL


Best of luck with school. You know Latin wouldn't be a bad thing to study if you are at Univeristy. I went to a community college so they didn't have all of those options.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 12:45 pm
by Ricky Romero
I never knew you went to nursing school, Ben.

Sharkchild, that's a bummer. If it helps at all, think of this time when you can focus on one class at a time as the calm before the storm. A nursing program is going to take a significant portion of your time. Take the next however many months to do things you might not be able to do while in nursing school; visit international relatives, do some home improvement, go to Wintergeddon or Z-con, or all of the above.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:03 pm
by Ben
Ricky Romero wrote:I never knew you went to nursing school, Ben.
You'll find I'm full of surprises.

Image

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:18 pm
by g30ff
Ben wrote:... You know Latin wouldn't be a bad thing to study if you are at Univeristy. I went to a community college so they didn't have all of those options.
Going into a field that will require a lot of science, especially anatomy, a knowledge of Latin will help. I experienced this firsthand doing a lot of 4th year zoology courses as electives in university (my background was mostly arts & social sciences at the time). To many of my BSc classmates the names and terms were a real chore to learn and memorize but for me half the time they gave away the answers to any question I was likely to be asked about them. This helped me do well despite not having any knowledge of math/chem/physics/physiology/etc.

But...

...despite this I'd suggest you leave it alone, unless you know you're a wiz when it comes to picking up new languages. As rewarding as it is, it helped me because I'd already been through all the basics and they were well in the past. The first semester or two will really be pushing grammar (which you won't find especially helpful) because it is hard to concentrate on expanding vocabulary with passages of real latin until all the grammar is there. If you know another romance language like Spanish or French you will have a bit of a leg up on your classmates, but Latin is far more inflected and you will still have declension to worry about for the first time (unless you happen to know Romanian).

The university classroom may be the best way you have available to you to learn a new language but it is still far from ideal. It can be pretty rushed at the beginning with lots of new words and rules to memorize. If you are looking to boost your average to guarantee admission to a competitive progrm and wrap your brain around stats for the very first time Latin will be a drain on your time and a burden on your memory that you could probably do without. That said, YMMV.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:43 pm
by herbalpagan
good luck! my daughter had to wait due to the program not having any space. If she had thought about it then, she says she would have taken a CNA course as well as any first aid course she could get her hands on. She says that the memorization required is tough, so anything you can do to get some med terms and prectices into your head will help!
She's been in the program for a month now and after 2 yrs in college already, she is finding it really a challenge! Has a huge 3" binder full already, and the 4 tests for the semester are 24% each of her grade...all the rest of the work is only 4%!

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:38 pm
by SharkChild
I will pick up my gpa more so there is no question about me getting in. I am just thinking of what other classes to take. I know I will take two but I need two more.

I have a good amount of friends that have an associates in nursing, but now they are getting there backlors(spelling). The only real difference that I have been told is that with a bachlor's you can hold better position, the pay is the same.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 6:00 pm
by SharkChild
Ricky Romero wrote:I never knew you went to nursing school, Ben.

Sharkchild, that's a bummer. If it helps at all, think of this time when you can focus on one class at a time as the calm before the storm. A nursing program is going to take a significant portion of your time. Take the next however many months to do things you might not be able to do while in nursing school; visit international relatives, do some home improvement, go to Wintergeddon or Z-con, or all of the above.
That is my plan to have fun and join everybody in the manbath. I will have a good time before I get in.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 6:28 pm
by herbalpagan
Sharkchild- go ask your advisor what you will need along with the nursing program to get your bachelors. It isn't just a better position, it's also lots more choices, and the pay should be a bit better!
:)

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 6:41 pm
by SharkChild
herbalpagan wrote:Sharkchild- go ask your advisor what you will need along with the nursing program to get your bachelors. It isn't just a better position, it's also lots more choices, and the pay should be a bit better!
:)
I got an appointment to see my advisor. I have a friend that got is associates and he makes about $80,000 a year. I have some family members that are Rn's with there bachlors. They say the same thing. They both have to pass the state board exam.
Postion and choices do make the pay different but from what they say the skill is the same. RN's with there bachlor's and RN's with there associates get the same pay from my understanding. RN's with the bachlor's can hold positon such as head nurse and such.

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:39 pm
by GeneralDiscontent
Don't get too bummed out, there is such a high demand for nurses right now that most nursing programs have HUGE waiting lists. My girlfriend already has a bachelor's degree in healthcare administration and is a licensed EMT, she is trying to get into a nursing program and won't be able to start until the fall of 2008 at the earliest. In the meantime she is getting as many classes out of the way as she can at the local community college (she's taking microbiology right now too) and volunteering at the local children's hospital. You might also ask your advisor if your school offers a CLEP exam for the statistics class - it'll cost you $50.00 or so, but you might get out of taking the class altogether...

Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:00 pm
by Ben
sharkchild wrote:
herbalpagan wrote:Sharkchild- go ask your advisor what you will need along with the nursing program to get your bachelors. It isn't just a better position, it's also lots more choices, and the pay should be a bit better!
:)
I got an appointment to see my advisor. I have a friend that got is associates and he makes about $80,000 a year. I have some family members that are Rn's with there bachlors. They say the same thing. They both have to pass the state board exam.
Postion and choices do make the pay different but from what they say the skill is the same. RN's with there bachlor's and RN's with there associates get the same pay from my understanding. RN's with the bachlor's can hold positon such as head nurse and such.
Well here a charge nurse gets a pay differential but it is not much. The big advantage in the BSN is you can get a Master's. I know MSN/MBAs that are now making big money in consulting. There is also the opportunity to go into a big pay job like CRNA or a very rewarding one like CNP. The reason you don't see much of a difference in pay between an ASN and BSN is most of the classes for BSN are not nursing related and why would a hospital want to pay for skills that you are not using.

Posted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 1:23 am
by KillerRN
Dont loose hope it is well worth it, It is the best thing I ever did!, I have a degree in buisness(which turns out is pretty much worthless) and a 4 year RN degree, best spent 4 years of my life! you will have so many job offers you will have a hard time picking the one you want....And the pay isnt bad either. :D


Good luck! :wink: you will do great!

Posted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 9:34 am
by TravisM.1
My wife was in pretty much the same boat.

A few years ago, my wife decided to go to nursing school. She was looking at taking an RN program at the nearest Penn State campus. We went to meet with the course advisor/guidence counselor, whatever they call them at the college level.

Basically, she couldn't get into the course right away, because she didn't have the right math/science credits from High School (when she didn't give nursing a second thought), so she'd have to get the credits before she could even apply for the class. Of course, they offer them right there, on campus. How convenient, huh?

So, I asked the lady, how soon can she get in, assuming she has the credits?

Her answer was, "Even then, we can't guarantee a seat in the class for her."

The course is limited to 60 students per year. To get that 60 students, they first have to accept any scholarships to the program. Then, they have to accept transfers from other Penn State campuses. Thirdly, they have to accept transfers from other colleges. Finally, they look to the new applicants to fill any empty seats. Of course, each category has waiting lists backlogged up to two years. Basically, my wife could have gone to Penn State for six years, have all the prerequisite credits from the university she planned to attend for her license, and still not be able to actually take the course she wanted to take.

She ended up going to a local Vo-Tech to get an LPN license. I hope she does something more, but she likes what she's doing for now.

Posted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 11:30 am
by razi
i'm in a similar boat. I can't afford to get back into architecture grad school right now, so I'm working and trying to pay off bills/save money.

Posted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:51 pm
by Hanuman110
After being a printer for almost 10 years and getting layed off twice I decided to go back to college to become a nurse. My initial plan was to knock out the pre-reqs at the local university and go to another college for an accelerated program that would get me out faster.

Then I found out how much the accelerated program was gonna cost me and that I probably couldn't come up with the amount of financial aid I would require(I already have a B.S. in Printing Management so a lot of financial aid options were out). So I decided to stay at my current school. When I went to talk to the head of hte nursing program to get in for the fall they told me I still needed to retake Algebra, even though the schools Registrar had told me I wouldn't. So that held me up an entire year.

So Sharkchild, I've felt your pain. However, I did convince them to let my business stats class from my previous degree subsititue for the Healthcare Stats class that my classmates have to suffer through.

Keep at it, you'll get in eventually.

And as a bit of advice for any college student, KEEP A COPY OF EVERY PIECE OF OFFICIAL PAPERWORK THAT PASSES YOUR HANDS!!!!

I've had the financial aid office and nursing department lose several forms that I had handed in. I caught the schools financial aid director in a lie (in front of the school President no less) and threatened a law suit because she personally knocked me out of about $4000 in financial aid funds by not filing paperwork on schedule with the state. So cover your butt when dealing with the administrative offices of your school.

Posted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:03 am
by jung
Getting into a choice program isn't all about GPA, though that is important. Having extra curricular activities will also open a lot of doors, especially if GPA is a little lower than what you want.

I'd say speech is pretty important, though rudimentary. So is MMA in some cases. I'm grinning when I write this but my mom told me about code yellow or something. It's when a fight breaks out in the hospital. Basically, it brings the police and big male nurses to the scene. Seems like it happens a bit between patients and doctors, the psych ward, etc.

Posted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:47 pm
by southalabama
Life is a marathon, hang in there you'll get your goal.

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 6:55 am
by colinz
Ben wrote:I still don't understand why you need speech to be a nurse but I guess it is up there with Stats. LOL


Best of luck with school. You know Latin wouldn't be a bad thing to study if you are at Univeristy. I went to a community college so they didn't have all of those options.
Speech/Public Speaking because at work you will be basically be "speaking in public" all the time. ;)

Statistics are required so you are better able to critically analyse medical research, not everything that is published is "good" research, or comes to the "proper" conclusions. :)

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 9:48 am
by kyle
Moved to "Off Topic"