"The Impossible" Discussion

Discuss those "what if" or "what would you do" scenarios you've been wondering about.

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Gingerbread Man
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"The Impossible" Discussion

Post by Gingerbread Man » Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:00 pm

Okay, this movie was great. How do you survive a tsunami with nothing? How do you reconnect with loved ones? How do you help others?
The film revolves around a family that is hit full on by the tsunami.
I'd like to start this thread to discuss the film and its events. I'll post a trailer once I'm on a computer.

ETA: Cool, Elbow posted a link to a trailer. Also, if you don't shed a tear watching this film you have no heart.
Last edited by Gingerbread Man on Tue Mar 05, 2013 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Impossible Discussion

Post by ninja-elbow » Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:26 pm

Is it showing yet?

ETA: I had no idea it was in theatres now, must see this. Trailer for Regulator:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... u-T7hsqSww#" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;!
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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by DFWMTX » Wed Mar 06, 2013 4:41 pm

How to Survive a Tsunami

Steps 1-3 are pre-planning stuff, 4 onwards is dealing with the shit once it gets real.

THe main thing I always heard is if you see the water receed quickly, run inland and/or go up. Some of the folks who are the first to die in a tsunami are those who go into the intertidal areas exposed when the water receeds because it's such a surprising event.

Admittedly, one thing I don't do before traveling internationally which I should do is research where the nearest American embassy/consulate is, and write down its contact information somewhere.
It can always get worse.

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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by pyratemime » Wed Mar 13, 2013 11:37 pm

DFWMTX wrote:Admittedly, one thing I don't do before traveling internationally which I should do is research where the nearest American embassy/consulate is, and write down its contact information somewhere.
Just a note on this comment. First if you are going overseas register the trip with the Embassy so in an emergency they know where to start looking for you. Second don't just have their contact info but get google maps that show driving and walking directions from your hotel and any other likely location you are going to spend extended time. Lastly, get directions/contact info to two or three friendly embassies. Depending on the issue the US Embassy may be inaccessible and knowing where else you might be able to get some help is a good back up plan.

I did all those things when I took 25 students overseas this winter and it made me much more comfortable if things went poorly.
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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by DFWMTX » Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:57 am

Well, it my next trip, it's almost a moot point. I'll be on an island and the nearest consulate is on the mainland.
It can always get worse.

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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by pyratemime » Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:00 am

Still worth registering the trip with the State Department. Better for them know you are in the area and never need to act on that fact than think they accounted for everyone and leave you (even more) isolated on that island.
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DaJoker wrote:In regards to us "normal" humans... well that's why its best to follow pyratemime's advice.

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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by Mikeyboy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:18 am

DFWMTX wrote:How to Survive a Tsunami

Steps 1-3 are pre-planning stuff, 4 onwards is dealing with the shit once it gets real.

THe main thing I always heard is if you see the water receed quickly, run inland and/or go up. Some of the folks who are the first to die in a tsunami are those who go into the intertidal areas exposed when the water receeds because it's such a surprising event.

Admittedly, one thing I don't do before traveling internationally which I should do is research where the nearest American embassy/consulate is, and write down its contact information somewhere.
That is the sad thing about the 2004 Tsunami, not a lot of people knew the warning signs. Sitting on a shoreline, the water will always push out and receed back in a rhythm, usually with a slight incremental creep up or back in the pattern of where the water reaches the shore because of high/low tide and wind. The water doesn't necessarily receed quickly when a Tsunami hits, what it does though is it receeds way back, sometimes slowly, completely out of sync. You will see it, but if you were swiming in deep water beyond the shore you might not even feel it, and it may take several minutes for the waves to start churning again and the tsunami to hit. Like you mentioned at some shoreline resorts before the Tsunami hit, the water pulled back unusually far, and exposed coral reefs, and sea life, and unfortunately a lot of tourist and locals, especially children not knowing what was about to happen actually walked out toward the water to investigate. Like you said, if you see that start, haul ass to high ground.

Another thing to know is when the tsumani wave hits, the rhythm is still in play, but now it bigger and longer. Everyone thinks its one BIG wave, but its not and that is what kills a fair amount of people. You are lucky enough to make it to high ground, and you are watching that tsumani wave comes in, flooding inland and pushing people, cars, trees and debris, it will eventually start to receed back. That DOES NOT mean its over. During the 2004 Tsunami, people started coming down from the rooftops and concrete balconies, to survey the damage , only to get nailed by the second heavy, debris filled wave. The surges during the 2004 tsunami came and went in 5 minute to 1 hour intervals.

The after effects when the worst of it is over has a lot of variables. I had a vacation to Aruba in December 2001, so the stories of what happened to the American tourist stranded there during 9/11 and the flight shutdown preceeding that was real interesting. Local Hotels, resorts, and the Aruban government went out of there way to make sure the thousands of stranded tourist were fed, had a place to stay, and could get back home when the planes were able to fly over the USA again. However that is a small, fully functional society, that makes money on tourism, helping out a small subset of tourist. What if Aruba was a poor 3rd world island? What if instead of Aruba we were talking about Cuba or some other country not friendly to Americans. What if Aruba was also hit by a disaster and their society was in shammbles. I guess the main goal post disaster while on vacation is to get your family or traveling companions together, if anyone is hurt seek medical attention, to get out of the area and to get back home.

Whether its post 9/11, post Katrina, post Tsunami, gathering everyone or finding people seem to be a combo of leaving messages and seeking out aid organizations. Those billboards seem to unfortunately pop up everytime post disaster and I would take advantage of them. As a father my goal is to seek out my wife and kids, I would put up notes saying I'm alive, and I'm looking for my wife and kids, mention their names and a quick description, that I will be back, where I'm going next, and that if my kids are reading this to stay put. Going back to the whole "if you are lost" talk with the kids, your kids if seperated from their parents, should seek out those in uniform, like a police officer, fire-fighter, or soldier. At some point once the red cross or the government get re-established, there should be a list of survivors and dead going around. and you can check there. However I would not believe any alive/dead list until I physically comfirm it face to face.

Once you get everyone together, and everyone is healthy enough to travel, next mission is to get out of the disaster area. Again, a lot of factors. It was probably easier to get out of Fukushima Prefecture Japan post 2011 tsunami vs Banda Aceh Indonesia in 2004 even though the events and land masses are somewhat similar. Japan is more industrialized, Richer, American friendly, and they have better disaster response systems in place. However both Banda Aceh and Fukushima are coastal town on massive land mass island with areas that are completely untouch, so you just need to get out of the disaster zone, re-establish contact with the local unaffected civilization and get your butt to an embassy or airport. It would be even harder to get out something like Phuket Island Thialand because the whole island would be affected and you cannot simply walk to civilization.

Anyway, real interesting topic OP, thanks for bringing it up.

http://www.dosomething.org/tipsandtools ... an-tsunami" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_India ... nd_tsunami" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_T%C5% ... nd_tsunami" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: "The Impossible" Discussion

Post by 2now » Sat Mar 16, 2013 10:16 am

how about signing up with these guys:

https://www.globalrescue.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Less than $600/year and they will come and snatch out your whole family for medical issues, twice that and they will be available for security issues too. Pretty cheap is you have enough income to travel the world.
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