Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

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Kilo147
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Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Kilo147 » Wed May 08, 2013 4:35 am

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Kirk ... &smobile=y" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


You want a real life disaster? This is what we have to worry about. Not civil war, not North Korea, but the literal wasting away of what little land we have, the destruction of water supplies, and rampant disease due to both toxic water and mosquitos in immeasurable numbers. My city recycled more than San Francisco last year, yet we let this happen. Who the fuck are we to call ourselves environmentally friendly, who are we to call ourselves green, who are we to say we protect what little we have? We deserve no accolades, no rewards. Just shame, and the loss of nature.

(shamelessly copied from my Facebook feed.)
Everything I know is dead. My little part of the world will soon be a wasteland. Thanks to the city of Kirkland, Juanita Bay is a dead zone. No multicellular life, save for carp, exist. Birds are leaving, beavers have moved to the creeks, an entire population of frogs, amphibians, turtles, fish, and other aquatic life have been wiped out. This summer mosquitos will be in numbers larger than we have ever seen, and the wetlands may very well die. We are witnesses to an environmental collapse that hasn't been seen since warships were built on Lake Washington.

Now bacteria rule the bay. All other life is dead or has moved on. There is nothing left. And it may be decades until it recovers.

No one will serve any sentence for this literal genocide. No fines will be given. No punishment to anyone. Just an "oops, our bad" and a bullshit statement that things will get better. In three years, almost 200,000 gallons of raw sewage has been pumped into our bay. Most recently 68,000 gallons in a single day, with enough chlorine in the tap water to kill the salmon in the creeks from runoff. Now we all pay the price for Kirklands inaction.

May God have mercy on us all.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by TacAir » Wed May 08, 2013 10:05 am

From the article
"The Kirkland Pump Station has been operating for more than 40 years. In 2013, King County will invest $2 million in a project to increase the station’s pumping capacity, replace aging equipment, and install new, larger diameter pipes, according to a county press release."

They recognized the issue in 1999 and started the process to provide new/upgraded equipment.

I tried to find images of the massive mats of raw sewage that used to grace the waters of Boston harbor, but haven't been able to find any. If they can clean up Boston Harbor, lake Washington should be a piece of cake.

You may want to scratch China and India off of your list of places to vacation. As bad as it may seem in your front yard, it is an eco-paradise compared to most of Asia.

Rather than despair, ask yourself "what can I do to help prevent another spill?"
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Valarius » Wed May 08, 2013 5:53 pm

Kilo147 wrote:May God have mercy on us all.
To quote Mel Gibson's character from the movie Ransom: "may God be with you, because no one on Earth will."

But first, you. If for some reason you haven't already, you need--NEED in all capital letters here--to get your preps in order. Do you have drinking water and water filters in your place ready to go? Someone might get the idea that water lines were contaminated somewhere and thus should be shut off for repairs. Do you have a bucket of sand and lots of plastic bags, or some kind of impromptu toilet/outhouse ready? Because city officials may decide SHUT DOWN ALL THE SEWER PIPES as a possible action. You don't really know. You can only prepare.

The sealife may come back. I hope so.
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by NT2C » Wed May 08, 2013 6:14 pm

Has it caught fire yet?

It could be worse...
At least 13 fires have been reported on the Cuyahoga River, the first occurring in 1868. The largest river fire in 1952 caused over $1 million in damage to boats and a riverfront office building. Fires erupted on the river several more times before June 22, 1969, when a river fire captured the attention of Time magazine, which described the Cuyahoga as the river that "oozes rather than flows" and in which a person "does not drown but decays".
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Kilo147 » Wed May 08, 2013 9:43 pm

Valarius wrote:
Kilo147 wrote:May God have mercy on us all.
To quote Mel Gibson's character from the movie Ransom: "may God be with you, because no one on Earth will."

But first, you. If for some reason you haven't already, you need--NEED in all capital letters here--to get your preps in order. Do you have drinking water and water filters in your place ready to go? Someone might get the idea that water lines were contaminated somewhere and thus should be shut off for repairs. Do you have a bucket of sand and lots of plastic bags, or some kind of impromptu toilet/outhouse ready? Because city officials may decide SHUT DOWN ALL THE SEWER PIPES as a possible action. You don't really know. You can only prepare.

The sealife may come back. I hope so.

I'm prepared for the human element. Not the loss of nature.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Stercutus » Thu May 09, 2013 8:48 am

Kilo147 wrote:
Valarius wrote:
Kilo147 wrote:May God have mercy on us all.
To quote Mel Gibson's character from the movie Ransom: "may God be with you, because no one on Earth will."

But first, you. If for some reason you haven't already, you need--NEED in all capital letters here--to get your preps in order. Do you have drinking water and water filters in your place ready to go? Someone might get the idea that water lines were contaminated somewhere and thus should be shut off for repairs. Do you have a bucket of sand and lots of plastic bags, or some kind of impromptu toilet/outhouse ready? Because city officials may decide SHUT DOWN ALL THE SEWER PIPES as a possible action. You don't really know. You can only prepare.

The sealife may come back. I hope so.

I'm prepared for the human element. Not the loss of nature.
You can take heart, humans will one day disappear. Nature not so much.
You go 'round and around it
You go over and under
I go through

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Pondo_Sinatra » Sat May 11, 2013 12:05 am

KJ4VOV wrote:Has it caught fire yet?

It could be worse...
At least 13 fires have been reported on the Cuyahoga River, the first occurring in 1868. The largest river fire in 1952 caused over $1 million in damage to boats and a riverfront office building. Fires erupted on the river several more times before June 22, 1969, when a river fire captured the attention of Time magazine, which described the Cuyahoga as the river that "oozes rather than flows" and in which a person "does not drown but decays".
I've told folks where I'm from, and more than once they've responded with "Oh, that's where that river caught fire".

I remember going to the banks of the Erie during my childhood and enjoying all the dead, rotting fish washed up on shore.

Recognizing the problem is the first step, things get better once people get actively involved in solving the problem.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by jdbl14 » Sat May 11, 2013 10:52 am

I am from north east Ohio as well and if anywhere is proof that waterways can recover it is here. It doesn't happen overnight, but when civilization stops dumping nature takes back what belongs to it.

The older I get I find myself taking a fatalistic view on the environment. Once we fuck it up bad enough and wipe ourselves out, nature will be fine.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by phil_in_cs » Sat May 11, 2013 3:08 pm

When folks say "nature won't recover" they are generally talking in human time frames. The fires that devastated my favorite hiking area in Bastrop 18 months ago mean that forest won't be in that condition again in my life time; and pine forests grow more quickly than most. My daughter will be grown with teens of her own by the time it is as it was 2 years ago.

All that's a blink in the eye for the Earth, though.
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Kilo147 » Sat May 11, 2013 4:02 pm

Oh, of course. That why when people say nuclear war would destroy the planet I just laugh maniacally.

As for the bay. All I've seen there are turtles, and very few of them, carp, and land animals. Even the hawks and eagles are moving away. Ducks are starting to come back, but very slowly. I counted ten last time. There should be a hundred. I've noticed spiders getting fatter and myself getting eaten alive by mosquitos. There's already more than normal.

I'll probably head by later today and see how the plant life is doing.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by JayceSlayn » Sat May 11, 2013 5:42 pm

While that sort of sewage spill isn't the kind of thing that most large animals are happy with, it is actually usually a boon to plants and animals in other niches - their predators leave and their food becomes plentiful. Nature is incredibly diverse, and an environment like a lake is actually in a kind of metastable equilibrium. When the balance of resources (or waste, to some) tips in one direction, organisms that live on those resources flourish. Oftentimes, however, those organisms are food for another set of organisms, and so-on and so-forth until a bunch of generations down the food chain everything is nearly back to the same as it was before.

We (humans) seem to have an innate, contradictory desire to both shape nature to our habitation and desires, but also to try to keep it the same and stable around us. In some cases I think this comes from the practical desire that we don't want our environment changing after we're happy with it, but that's a debate in the realm of psychology, I guess. Environments are not naturally stable at all, though. Forest fires "devastate" a climax community and leave an ashen wasteland, but immediately afterward a new and diverse bloom of life begins, starting the long, long journey to climax community once again. "Recovery" is a concept that we like to strive for, and in many cases we are saddened because it will take longer than we'll get to enjoy living, but it is natural too.

I am not defending what happened at this beach as anything but what appears to be a preventable tragedy, but while it may have caused widespread damage, in the greater scheme of things it isn't so bad. It is hard to not feel small when comparing oneself (or even the entirety of human civilization) to the grandeur of nature, but I still feel we have an important part to play in our time.
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by shrapnel » Sat May 11, 2013 8:49 pm

Sewage spills aren't that pleasant for anything much more complex than plankton, either directly, or because the resultant blooms and dieoffs strip oxygen from the water. Sure, it'll heal eventually, but in the meantime it's a stinking mess, literally and figuratively, both from the sewage and from the rotting everything. It looks bad, it smells bad, and it isn't a particularly pleasant environment for us to exist in. Furthermore, there are the issues that echo and propagate down the food chain and into other environments. Using your forest fire example, sure, after a normal fire, plants spring right back up, because they're adapted to that level of disruption. After a particularly hot fire, though, like one where humans have suppressed fires for the past 30 years and the accumulated forest debris is able to act as fuel, communities take much much longer to recover, and often they're significantly less diverse than the ones they replaced. Less diversity usually means less tolerance to other disruptions, and all of that means that once the initial large disruption has occurred, it's easier for the area to remain unable to support the kind of robust, diverse community that it once did.

Just because it will eventually fix itself in some way or other, and just because it isn't an area the size of Rhode Island or something. doesn't mean that it isn't a terrible thing that can have a lot of far-reaching implications to other areas.
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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by fidalgoman » Sat May 11, 2013 9:45 pm

For the most part environmentalism is more about control than the environment. As in just about everything to do with government it seems there is a relaxing of standards once control and submission is established. Think political football. Few people even the concerned have any deep concept of real environmental mechanisms. Sadly this is nothing new for King county. We reap what we sow. Sad.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Kilo147 » Sat May 11, 2013 10:45 pm

fidalgoman wrote:For the most part environmentalism is more about control than the environment. As in just about everything to do with government it seems there is a relaxing of standards once control and submission is established. Think political football. Few people even the concerned have any deep concept of real environmental mechanisms. Sadly this is nothing new for King county. We reap what we sow. Sad.
Yep, this is on the par for King Co.

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Re: Complete environmental collapse near Seattle.

Post by Nutpantz » Sat May 11, 2013 11:05 pm

In one hundred thousand years there will be nothing to show for our time on the planet.to think that anything we do will make a lasting difference to the planet is hubris..

Environmentalism is like trying to clean a group home.no matter how many people try to clean it only takes a few lazy or greedy people to have everyone living in filth.

no one likes to live in filth, but until there are real consequences, money will change hands and nothing will change.
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