AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

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AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by MacabeeSicarius » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:02 am

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Last week I was fortunate enough to attend MilCopp's Level I Tactical Rifle & Pistol course, taught by instructors Donald Copp and David Merrill. Their bios can be read here. The course was on a Saturday, the conditions were still, cloudless, dry and hot (c. 90F).

This was the second MilCopp course I had taken, the previous one being a .22LR analog course. Right off the bat it was apparent that the tempo of this course was going to be a lot faster than the .22 course. Perhaps this can be attributed to the composition of the class (a mix of active LEO, former and current military and competent 3-gun competitors) or changes in the curriculum and how it was taught. I certainly welcomed the faster pace.

We started out with some paperwork, once that was complete we got on line for a safety briefing. We were instructed that we would wear our full rigs, have our rifles slung and pistols holstered for the entirety of the day, including during our lunch break. This was not just for weapon accountability and to get into the practice of being geared up all day, but also to find out how comfortable and practical our fighting rigs were. Not surprisingly, every student with a single point or triple point sling, or a cheap Condor vest was cursing their gear and vowing to replace it by the end of the day.

In addition to having our weapons on our persons all day, we were informed that our weapons would also be run hot most of the day - to be cleared out only during the aforementioned lunch break and during specific instruction sequences. As such, trigger discipline, muzzle discipline and selector awareness were of the utmost importance. Anyone with their booger-hook on the bang-switch, sweeping themselves / classmates / instructors with a muzzle, or with a selector in the wrong state, would be watching the class from the sidelines.

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The next order of business was a gear check and weapon check. All weapons were function-checked by instructors and our rigs examined. If someone had a "tactical knee holster" or a piece of gear that was configured wrong they were instructed on how to square it away. If someone had a piece of kit that was junk, they were advised to shit-can it.

With the briefing concluded, we put our first rounds downrange, zeroing our rifles. Basic primary marksmanship instruction was dispensed: advice on correct prone form, breath control, trigger squeeze, sight alignment, sight picture. The usefulness of the 50m zero for 5.56 and 5.45 was discussed. Our rifles correctly zeroed, we moved on to our first drills of the day.

All drills were to be competitive, with winners receiving prizes and bragging rights. In addition, the winners of the first three drills would serve as captains when we broke off into teams. The targets we would use throughout the day were NRA standard small-bore bullseyes, stapled in the center of IPSC cardboard backers. Hits within the black portion of the bullseyes would count as 0 points, whereas hits on the white portion, or on the cardboard would count as 1 or 3 points, respectively. When a shot-timer was used and drills were calculated with a time-added measure, a certain number of seconds would be added for any hits outside the black.

The first drills were based around level changes: up-down drills and modified-Delta drills. The tactical importance of changing levels was stressed by cadre.

Once our first set of drills was complete, the captains picked their teams, school yard dodgeball style. About a third of the class had Kalashnikov pattern rifles, they were all on one team, the other two teams were all equipped with AR15s.

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I usually try not to harp on gear, but I will take a moment to describe what the instructors were running. Don was armed with a Glock 19 and M&P15. Dave was running a 9mm service Glock (34 or 17RTF) and had several rifles for instructional purposes: an Arsenal AK, a short-barreled BCM AR, a 16" AR with ACOG & offset Micro, as well as a FN SCAR. Both instructors would demonstrate the techniques we were learning in front of the class with their rifles cleared and chamber flags inserted.

However, when Dave was finished demonstrating a technique, he would casually toss his rifle over his shoulder, letting it clatter to the ground about six feet behind him. The first time he did this, it elicited gasps of shock and horror from some students. Later on in the day, he would explain that if you're not comfortable tossing your rifle, then perhaps it shouldn't be your fighting rifle. You have to be confident that your rifle and all the bits bolted onto it, will be able to take some knocks and still perform. Honestly, if I owned a SCAR, I don't think I'd have the heart to toss it like that, but that's another topic for another day.

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The next element of movement that was incorporated was forward linear movement. We got on line and all "Groucho-walked" towards our targets while firing. We were told that whenever possible we should not pull the trigger at the same time as our heels hit the ground, as it would adversely affect accuracy. Once we reached our targets, scanned and assessed our surroundings, the drill was concluded. When I used the word "incorporated" in the beginning of this paragraph, I mean just that. Every technique we were taught would be stacked on top of the next one. If we were changing mags, we would change levels. If we eliminated a threat, we would scan and assess, looking for additional threats. I really did like the way the course was structured, every technique we drilled seemed to dovetail nicely into the next.

Speaking of the next drill, it was individual. Each of us would navigate a path around a couple of 50 gallon barrels while maintaining fire on multiple targets. The path necessitated forward, backward and lateral movement. Each student would have Dave or Don behind them, with a hand on their shoulder to give instruction and to make sure nobody got into any trouble by getting their feet tangled up. Before the class I already knew never to cross your feet while shooting and moving; the preferred method is to shuffle when moving side-to-side. So I guess it goes without saying that during this exercise I crossed my feet over more times than a Russian ballet company.

The next series of drills were focused on weapon presentation. As a class, we'd start with our backs to the targets. On command we would turn, leading with the head, step forward, pivot around the muzzle (being careful not to sweep one's self or classmates) bring the rifle up, disengage the safety, neutralize the threat, scan, assess and return the weapon to a safe state. Deliberate weapon handling was stressed.

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Once we had that down, we had our next batch of drills - the first team drills of the day. Our teams (each the size of a fireteam) would walk laterally along the firing line, either from right to left, or left to right with our weapons hanging on safe, slung at the low-ready. On command we would turn towards our targets, leading with the head, bring up our weapons, flip selectors to fire, engage threats, scan, assess and return weapons to safe.

From here we moved on to using cover effectively. We worked individually, running up to a simulated barricade, shooting through the hole in the wall, while an instructor was behind us watching us for form and safety. Standoff distance from cover (especially not flagging the muzzle or resting the barrel) and sight-offset were stressed.

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After that, we worked on shoulder transitions. Different techniques were shown for various sling configurations. We did several dry runs with cleared weapons, switching the stock from one shoulder to the other, before switching the grip. It was explained that that method is preferred because its a more secure transition and because in an emergency you can still fire off the support-side shoulder with your firing-side grip (although not comfortably or as accurately). Next we moved on to individual live fire shoulder transitions around simulated hard cover.

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The next area of instruction covered malfunctions. Various types of malfunctions and their remedies were discussed - from the simple tap-rack-bang, to the "oh crap" stuck-bolt pogo. Next we talked about double-feeds, case-head separation / rim shearing and methods of clearing out double-feeds. From here, while keeping our weapons on safe and pointed downrange, we deliberately caused double-feeds in our rifles, by locking back the action, inserting a loaded magazine, dropping a round into the action and closing the bolt. After that, we would clear our weapons, chamber a live round and simulate firing.

During the course of intentionally causing malfunctions, I was (through my amazing skill) able to cause a beautiful bolt-over double-feed; the live round wedging itself between the charging handle channel in the upper and the gas tube. In fact, it was such a gorgeous bolt-over double-feed, that the class was temporarily halted, while my Noveske was shown as an example to the other students as an illustration of a textbook bolt-over double-feed malfunction. Not wanting to hold up the class or miss any material, while I attempted to un-fuck my rifle, I put the N4 away and grabbed my LMT which is configured almost identically to the Noveske.

After this, we got a little surprise: everyone's red dot sights stopped working! It was just like the EMP in Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2. OK, so it really was nothing like that, but for training purposes our RDSs were non-functional for the next string. We were told to turn off our red dots and engage our targets from 25m. The catch was, if your flip up sights were down at that moment they would have to stay down. If you didn't have irons at all, well you just got a free life-lesson. We were given some pointers on using our Aimpoints as giant ghost rings or shooting over the top of the EOTech hood. Both rifles I brought with me that day had fixed irons (LaRue BUIS on one, Daniels Defense A1.5 on the other) so I was pretty good to go.

Now that everyone had re-learned the importance of irons, it was time to relearn the importance of red dots - because it was time to practice urban-prone / rollover-prone / face-down-ass-up roll forward prone. Uncomfortable shooting positions are definitely where the RDS comes into its own. The bottom of the simulated cover / barricades were obscured even more, with IPSC targets stapled to them, resulting in just a little hole through which we could fire. Urban prone is always a challenging position for me, and I welcomed the opportunity to practice it and get more pointers.

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Next up, we covered sidearm transitions. Proper draw, presentation, extension and stance were covered. Some time was also taken to talk about tactics of using a pistol, the importance of the handgun as a fail-safe, the importance of "bumping up" full mags from the admin side to the loading side and so on. After that, we did live fire pistol transition drills as a group. From here on out, whenever we had a malfunction with our rifles or ran out of ammo, we would switch to our sidearms to shoot out the remainder of the drill.

Pretty soon it was time for lunch. We cleared out all of our weapons, but as stated before we kept them on our persons. While some people were eating lunch, others decided to do a bit of informal recreational shooting. With a RSO present, several classmates sprayed off rounds with a full-auto Powder Springs MAC 11 or tried out a SCAR for the first time.

After lunch, as class resumed, the heat of the day had reached its apex. The tempo of the class, however had not. So far, all we had learned were building blocks, but for the rest of the day we would be putting everything together. We had been starting out with dry runs, then going live, slowly increasing the speed, but from this point on, we'd be running flat out the whole time. All of the drills for the rest of the day were team relay drills and were timed with a shot-timer and scored for accuracy. A team would stand off behind the firing line. A shooter would run down to the firing line, complete his course of fire, run back to his team (weapon on safe, muzzle pointed in a safe direction) then the second shooter would run down to the firing line and so-on until the relay drill was completed.

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In regards to the first half of the day, I went into a lot of detail about each drill. For the second half of the day, I'm not going to do that, because each relay drill had multiple components and I've probably already gone on for too long. Suffice it to say, that the drills were composed of all of the smaller building blocks we'd worked on that day: level changes, shooting and moving, use of cover, shoulder transitions, pistol transitions, roll-over prone, & ct. It was a lot of material to cover in one day and by the end, everyone was exhausted, but in high spirits. Everyone I talked to was having a great time, learning a lot and everyone was an improved shooter by the conclusion of the course.


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We were told that the Level II rifle / pistol course picks up right where Level I leaves off. At the next available opportunity I'll attend that class. By the end of the Level I course I was so spent that I wouldn't have able to absorb anything else effectively, but the course left me wanting more - and I mean that in a good way. I'm not sure what's covered in the next course, but I'm anxious to find out.



As far as lessons learned and lessons reinforced for me:

1) Come prepared to class.
I wasn't expecting to need a back-up rifle, but I did need one. I also had a spare SIG P226 to back-up the one I was training with. In addition I brought a spare holster, in case of equipment malfuntion, spare sling, spare boots, twice as much ammo that was suggested for each weapon, and so on. Bring two rifles, two pistols, extra ammo - the peace of mind alone is worth it.

2) Learn your weak areas. Be honest with yourself. Work on your areas of deficiency at your home range.
For me, my pistol-craft could use more work. I'm not as good with a pistol as I am a rifle. Time to put more work in on my own time, so that next time I take a class, I can get more out of it.

3) Proper clothing is a must
At the last MilCopp class, I was cursing myself for leaving my elbow pads and knee pads at home. This time I brought them, but I forgot to wear compression shorts and got some painful heat rash in a very, erm personal and tender area. I was hurting bad by the end of the course. The powder I thought was in my rucksack, of course was at home.

Also on the clothing front - I'm the fool in woodland BDU pants, black boots and a black shirt. If I wore a khaki shirt and trousers, it probably would have kept me cooler. One of the students (not pictured because of his status as an undercover LEO) was wearing Level IIIA armor all day. I was not envious of how hot he must have felt and was thankful I left my armor at home that day, as I had considered wearing it to make training more realistic and to get a better workout.

TL;DR - It was an awesome class, enjoyed by all in attendance
Last edited by MacabeeSicarius on Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:19 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by agent-smith » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:15 am

Awesome AAR.

Milcopp is definitely on my short list of "places I need to train".
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by TDW586 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:24 am

Thanks for the review, Macabee. I've got to get up to Ohio to train with you guys once I'm back in the States.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by piratetech » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:29 am

Hmmm....never heard of that Dave guy before :lol:
I wanna stand between Necro and USMC for the ultimate "blow" job... wait... that came out wrong... :lol: -Grand94Jeep

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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by MacabeeSicarius » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:45 am

piratetech - you are one of the few who can rival Dave's beard.

also, thanks TDW & agent-smith for the kind words. i think i'm done with the cowardly ninja-edits to my summation. LOL i never get my grammar right the first time.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by piratetech » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:48 am

MacabeeSicarius wrote:piratetech - you are one of the few who can rival Dave's beard.
I keep all my sweet Tacticool stuff hidden in the beard


*EDIT*

Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
I wanna stand between Necro and USMC for the ultimate "blow" job... wait... that came out wrong... :lol: -Grand94Jeep

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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Devisis » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:10 pm

Wow that was a good read. I really hope I can afford to get training like that some day. I don't think the Sub 2000 would go over too well at my main rifle, though. (I plan in switching to an AK when I can afford a good one, and move out of NY)
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Dave_M » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:11 pm

piratetech wrote:Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
Course is $200. We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.
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Rifle first. Rifle last. Rifle always.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by piratetech » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:11 pm

DavePAL84 wrote:
piratetech wrote:Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
Course is $200. We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.
Not bad at all
I wanna stand between Necro and USMC for the ultimate "blow" job... wait... that came out wrong... :lol: -Grand94Jeep

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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by grand94jeep » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:23 pm

piratetech wrote:
DavePAL84 wrote:
piratetech wrote:Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
Course is $200. We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.
Not bad at all
ROADTRIP!!!

My only problem is I don't really have a backup MBR right now. Besides, I think Dave would kick me in the nuts for trying to run the course with a Sub2k if my Colt went down. :lol:
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by jeep45238 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:29 pm

DavePAL84 wrote:We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.

For those of us on a budget - is there a no-reloads allowed policy at MIlcopp courses?
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Dave_M » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:43 pm

jeep45238 wrote:For those of us on a budget - is there a no-reloads allowed policy at MIlcopp courses?
Reloads are just fine.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by piratetech » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:43 pm

grand94jeep wrote:
piratetech wrote:
DavePAL84 wrote:
piratetech wrote:Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
Course is $200. We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.
Not bad at all
ROADTRIP!!!

My only problem is I don't really have a backup MBR right now. Besides, I think Dave would kick me in the nuts for trying to run the course with a Sub2k if my Colt went down. :lol:
ROADTRIP!! Indeed....though I'll bring my AK as a backup if you promise not to try to run the course with the Sub2k
I wanna stand between Necro and USMC for the ultimate "blow" job... wait... that came out wrong... :lol: -Grand94Jeep

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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Kommander » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:47 pm

You do all that for $200? I have been looking for a class and the best price I can find locally is a Suraez class for $350 (though it is a two day class, the round count is the same). I could go up to Gunsite, but I would need to sell some organs to afford that. I do have a question about these types of training classes. After taking a rifle class and learning all these new things how am I (or any other average person) supposed to practice them? My local ranges aren't real keen on the whole diving for cover thing and I would rather not shoot alone in the desert for reasons to numerous to mention. Any ideas?
Last edited by Kommander on Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by MacabeeSicarius » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:49 pm

I think I remember Dave saying the next time they do this class it will be 2-day, but I won't presume to speak for him.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Paladin1 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 2:27 pm

Great write up. There was about two days of training packed into that day. It was great instruction and well worth the money!

The techniques learned will put you head and shoulders above the the average gun guy (and average LE for that matter).

One moment of frivolity was when we were doing a team competition drill and a tree behind the target line took one round too many and fell down on a couple targets!

To that teams credit they didn't miss a beat and completed the drill in winning fashion.

Personally, I limped for two days after that class :oops:
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by phil_in_cs » Sat Jul 10, 2010 2:58 pm

Excellent write up, and good job getting out and getting some training.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by whiskeytangofoxtrot » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:01 pm

Great AAR! Definetly going to look into this class when I am ready for another.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by bufordtjustice » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:28 pm

Great write up. I do not know what your experience is or skill set but from what you said...and showed with a few pictures...it sounds like the training was pretty solid. As far as the running hot at all times part, I completely agree that is the only way to go with advanced and most intermediate training. My only concern would be the diversity of your classmates' backgrounds. Also, you may have said it but what was the instructor to student ratio?

I noticed most seemed to run some sort of rhodesian rig coupled with a battle belt. Did you see any trends that surprised you or made you reevaluate how you were doing things (i.e. number of mags, placement of equipment that seemed counter-intuitive, etc.)? The reason I ask is after a bajillion hours or training and several deployments, I STILL change up my kit and try to stay current on new developments. For example, doing protection work for years, I ran a single point Dieter sling that worked very well and just changed one of them out the other day for a vickers.

I also like the mix between mil and leo. That is always a win in my book. Too often us guys who played in the sand box choose to address a tactical concern in a manner similar to a squad problem. If you also have leo experience or a partner who can present a different set of options or considerations for you, that is a solid training methodology.

And not to start a flame war, but I know my gear is high end, solid and works well. I keep it in as good of shape as I can and would never intentionally throw my stuff to show it was reliable. Hell, I don't think I would do that with anything Uncle Sugar gave me either. To each his own though. Their class, their rules.

Thanks again for the write up.

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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by MacabeeSicarius » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:48 pm

bufordtjustice wrote:Great write up. I do not know what your experience is or skill set but from what you said...and showed with a few pictures...it sounds like the training was pretty solid.
Well honestly, the only time I had ever sweat while doing anything gun related before this, was when I masturbated to Nutnfancy videos. :lol:

Just kidding :wink: I have some infantry experience under my belt, but I'm not a ODD ninja or a combat vet. But I was combat arms, I've been a CPL holder for over 5 years, I shoot 3-gun.

Yeah, your inference was correct: it was pretty solid.
bufordtjustice wrote:
As far as the running hot at all times part, I completely agree that is the only way to go with advanced and most intermediate training. My only concern would be the diversity of your classmates' backgrounds. Also, you may have said it but what was the instructor to student ratio?
Everyone was pretty squared away and took the gravity of the situation with the requisite seriousness of purpose. In every picture you will see indexed trigger fingers. The instructor to student ratio was 1:7 if I recall correctly.
bufordtjustice wrote:
I noticed most seemed to run some sort of rhodesian rig coupled with a battle belt. Did you see any trends that surprised you or made you reevaluate how you were doing things (i.e. number of mags, placement of equipment that seemed counter-intuitive, etc.)? The reason I ask is after a bajillion hours or training and several deployments, I STILL change up my kit and try to stay current on new developments. For example, doing protection work for years, I ran a single point Dieter sling that worked very well and just changed one of them out the other day for a vickers.
Nothing really made me reevaluate my rig, because I'm pretty happy with it & have already given it tons of thought. I run a HSGI Weesach, with a CamelBak ArmorBack, Safariland ALS...its the same gear I run for 3-gun, so I'm comfortable with it. I would run the same gear for SHTF too, the only difference is that I would be wearing it over Kevlar armor with SAAPI plates inserted.
bufordtjustice wrote: I also like the mix between mil and leo. That is always a win in my book. Too often us guys who played in the sand box choose to address a tactical concern in a manner similar to a squad problem. If you also have leo experience or a partner who can present a different set of options or considerations for you, that is a solid training methodology.
Agreed. We were lucky enough to have Don giving us a LEO / SWAT perspective and Dave giving us a military / combat perspective. In addition, the mix of students with both LEO, military and civilian shooting backgrounds worked out nicely as well.
bufordtjustice wrote: Thanks again for the write up.
Thanks for reading and commenting.
Last edited by MacabeeSicarius on Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Bearcat » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:50 pm

Thanks for the write up. I just have one question. What kind of prior training if any is needed to attend this class? It seems like a lot of fun, work and learning.
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by MacabeeSicarius » Sat Jul 10, 2010 5:04 pm

Bearcat wrote:Thanks for the write up. I just have one question. What kind of prior training if any is needed to attend this class? It seems like a lot of fun, work and learning.

Its a Level I course, so by definition there are no pre-requisites.

Once again, I won't presume to speak for MilCopp, but having just taken the class, my take on it is that it would be a good course for people who may be entirely new to gun-fighting. It's also good for those who are not foreign to combat training, but are looking for a refresher (gun-fighting is a perishable skill) or to learn some of the newer TTPs that are being employed nowadays.

I would not recommend this course for someone who has never held a gun before, or even anyone who is not fully versed in the operation of their handgun and rifle of choice. You need to know your way around a gun - the basics at least - if you want to take this class.

That's just how I see it.

Official blurb:
Tactical Rifle/Carbine Course Level 1

This one-day course is for individuals seeking training with the tactical rifle or carbine. Instruction focuses on firearms safety, administrative procedure, operational procedure and tactical shooting skills. The skill sets focused on are gear positioning on the body, equipment usage, reloading from the tactical gear, movement with the firearm, and transitioning from rifle/carbine to pistol. This class involves movement with loaded firearms and shooting while moving.

Personal equipment
Suitable tactical clothing (loose fitting/comfortable, rugged: cargo pants/polo, etc)
Boots
Individual protective equipment
Head cover (ball cap)
Wrap around eye protection (goggles or shooting glasses)
Ballistic vest (optional)
Gloves (leather preferred or shooting gloves)
Hearing protection (electronic style highly recommended)
Canteen and carrier, camelback or similar container
Rain gear

Weapons and related equipment
Assault rifle or carbine (Should be in a rifle caliber such as 5.56 or 7.62x39)
Sling suitable for transitions (single point, advanced 2-point, or 3-point sling)
4 magazines minimum
Magazine carrier
Sidearm
Belt and strong side holster
3 magazines
Magazine carrier
Weapon cleaning gear

Ammunition
600 rounds of assault rifle/carbine ammunition
200 rounds of sidearm ammunition

Tactical equipment
Flashlight (optional)
Optics for rifle/carbine sighted to the weapon (optional)
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Hoppy » Sat Jul 10, 2010 6:10 pm

grand94jeep wrote:
piratetech wrote:
DavePAL84 wrote:
piratetech wrote:Also...what was the round count and total cost for this course?
Course is $200. We tell people to bring 500 rifle and 200 pistol.
Not bad at all
ROADTRIP!!!

My only problem is I don't really have a backup MBR right now. Besides, I think Dave would kick me in the nuts for trying to run the course with a Sub2k if my Colt went down. :lol:
seriously. reasonable round count, low price....

Dave, didnt you get the memo, courses are supposed to be prohibitively expensive!
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Re: AAR: MilCopp Tactical, Level I rifle/pistol, July 3 2010

Post by Dumptruck » Sat Jul 10, 2010 6:27 pm

No kidding. These classes are supposed to be expensive to keep out the "riff raff" (regular joe). haha

Where in Ohio are you located, Dave? I am in WV and it would be well worth the drive I am sure.

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