The Car BOB. Sort of.

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

Post Reply
johndoe
* * *
Posts: 323
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:50 am

The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by johndoe » Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:21 am

For those who didn't catch it in the intro thread, my wife and I are fulltime RVers, so we face some challenges in terms of space for storing supplies. We simply don't have the room to have dedicated backpacking supplies, BOBs, INCHs, etc. In addition, since our house has wheels, our primary bug out option is to hitch up the RV and drive away. So that's some basic context to have when evaluating the BOB below.

As some more background, we have an AWD Honda Element that we take all sorts of places it's not meant to go...lately it's been really rough fireroads up in the Black Hills mountains of SD, but we've had it deep in the desert, in blizzards in Canada, and everywhere in between. With winter approaching we've become acutely aware that our trip up into the mountains is being made extra risky by snow and cold weather. We could cut out the trips, but we hope to spend the winter up in the backcountry improving our winter skills, snowshoeing, skiing, etc.

So here is my "BOB". I use the term loosely since it's probably a little heavier than a traditional BOB and it doesn't contain clothes. The thought process behind it is that the most likely risk scenario we face is getting stuck or broke down in the mountains in bad weather and having to shelter in place until help comes, or as a secondary option, humping out. If leaving the vehicle becomes necessary, my thought is that it would be easy to shed weight on the pack. In terms of a SHTF scenario, I figure the same could be true. Worst case scenario is I can hump the weight for at least a couple miles to gain distance from the threat, and then shed stuff en route.

Anyways, with that in mind, here you go.

First, the bag, loaded. It's a Kelty Redwing 3100. It's a light internal frame overnight style pack. This load is probably pushing the limits of the pack. It works, but I wouldn't want to add much.

Image

That's a cheap but good Kobalt ax on the left side, and a Rossi 22/410 Matched Pair in the black case on the left.

Here's the gun and the ammo.

Image

There's 200 rounds of 22 viper, 20 rounds of 000 buckshot for the .410, and 20 1/4 ounce slugs that can be used for self defense in a pinch. I plan to add some smaller buckshot to the mix as soon as I get around to a trip to the gunstore. And I'm aware that the .410 isn't anyone's idea of a defense gun, but that's really just a last ditch scenario anyways. The gun is for small game primarily, and is a good compromise between low weight and concealability. In a SHTF scenario, I'd likely grab more from my stocks, but the thought is addressing the most likely risk (breakdown in the backcountry).

Next up, a poncho, a 8x10 poly tarp for improvised shelter and a 80x60 wool/synth fire retardant blanket. I struggled with the blanket. I wanted something I could leave in the bag all the time. I have a nice MontBell super spiral sleeping bag for backpacking, but in order to keep it in the bag it would need to be fully compressed in its compression sack. It's unwise to store bags fully compressed as they lose their loft. Eventually I'll buy another bag and rotate the montbell to the BOB, but for now I like the wool blanket. It gives the ability to wear on the move for added warmth unlike a bag, plus in case of a vehicle or other fire, it theoretically could be used to suppress a small fire in the right situation.

Image

Below is pretty self-explanatory. Gerber folding shovel, hatchet, Gerber multitool, 100' 550 cord, and a Gerber LMF II ASEK knife.

Image

Next up, enhanced first aid kit, Garmin 62st with city navigator, 100k US topo, 24k topo card of the local area, spare batteries, a SPOT locator beacon, some wax covered cotton balls I forgot to include in the pic with the other firestarting stuff. The GPS, cards, and SPOT goes in that dry bag for easy removal for taking with me on the trail or other traveling. The best practice would be to buy a dedicated SPOT and mapping GPS for the BOB, but I don't have the coin and space for such luxuries, so they do double duty.

Image

This, however, always stays with the pack. In that yellow dry bag goes the backup etrex, a topo map of the area, compass, spare batteries, 4 boxes of waterproof matches, magnesium firestarter, and a LMF firestick. Also show is an orange vest for visibility for rescue, a chem light, a battery operated chem light/flashlight, and some crapper paper.


Image

Here's a little fishing kit that I put together. About 25 yards of line, a couple hooks, a jig, some weights. It all folds up nice and neat inside the Gorilla tape packet. I need to add some smaller hooks.

Image

Image

I debated about this stuff due to the bulk and weight. It's an MSR Dragonfly stove with white gas filled fuel bottle (rotated out monthly), a 2L MSR nonstick pot which the stove nests in for storage, an MSR Miniworks EX water filter, and 6 water purification tabs. Obviously I could cook over a fire but I liked the idea of having a fast, readily accessible snow melting ability in the event it was needed fast. Plus the stove is a multifuel model, so I could siphon gas from the vehicle. Likewise, I could boil water so the filter may be a little overkill. But again, if going footmobile is necessary I could always ditch this.


Image

Finally, some food. 4 foil packs (the large 6 ounce kind) of tuna, 2 packs of instant potatoes, and 4 packs of Gatorade. I want to add some instant coffee too, and I'm probably a little light on foodstuffs here, and I really need to supplement this a little. Also in this pic is my fishing kit, along with a bit of Gorilla tape rolled into a packet. That stuff can fix anything, so I always like to have it with me.

Image

For some reason I missed taking a picture of my 1 liter Kleen Kanteen with nesting canteen cup. But that's there also.

And that's it. Clothing is something I'm going back and forth on. I have some winter clothes I keep in the car and could ditch the stove and filter to make room in the pack, but I'm not sure on that. I also figure if we're in the mountains we're probably also carrying either (a) our full backpacking packs and sleeping bags, (b) Camelback HAWGs with various supplies, (c) and some combination of snow shoes, shoe spikes, etc.

Again, I know this has some nonessentials but they're there with the idea of sheltering in place by the vehicle and could always be ditched if necessary. So any thoughts or suggestions?

Oh, I'm also likely to have with me my EDC. Springfield XD45 (or my P3AT which isn't pictured because it's at the gunsmith, and likely about the be replaced by a Sig P238), a Masters of Defense CQD automatic opening knife with glass breaker, Solo laser torch with built in compass, Victorinox Ranger knife with Photon LED light, Droid phone, and wallet with GI can opener inside.

Image

User avatar
Foxy
* *
Posts: 126
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:08 am

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by Foxy » Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:35 am

Digging it!

I've had some bad luck with kelty back packs(zipper blew out) but just my experience, seems like the load you're packing is resonable.

Things I might stick in...
-2 1L water bottles, I think I read that you had a canteen not pictured, and I saw your H2O filter, Idk your AO but water may initially be hard to come by. If you end up not needing it you can shed it, no love loss.
-Small Bic, I see you EDC a pocket torch, and you have fire steel but a Bic weighs nearly nothing, is faster than the fire steel and if its in your pack and you loose your EDC no wories.
-Small FAK, just for minor bumps and what not, if not bandages and stuff then definitely at least some OTC meds, pain killers, cold meds.


Also IDK if it's your thing but the stock of that rifle looks like it could be hollowed to fit allot of useful stuff :D

johndoe
* * *
Posts: 323
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:50 am

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by johndoe » Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:44 am

Foxy wrote:Digging it!

I've had some bad luck with kelty back packs(zipper blew out) but just my experience, seems like the load you're packing is resonable.

Things I might stick in...
-2 1L water bottles, I think I read that you had a canteen not pictured, and I saw your H2O filter, Idk your AO but water may initially be hard to come by. If you end up not needing it you can shed it, no love loss.
-Small Bic, I see you EDC a pocket torch, and you have fire steel but a Bic weighs nearly nothing, is faster than the fire steel and if its in your pack and you loose your EDC no wories.
-Small FAK, just for minor bumps and what not, if not bandages and stuff then definitely at least some OTC meds, pain killers, cold meds.


Also IDK if it's your thing but the stock of that rifle looks like it could be hollowed to fit allot of useful stuff :D
Thanks for the input. The Kleen Canteen not pictured is the metal 1L version. I don't really have room for another, but maybe a small Camelback bladder or MSR Dromedary bag. The First Aid kit is pictured--fairly extensive since my wife is in healthcare...we have a "real" FAK/trauma bag that's also going to end up in the car too. Bics...I keep saying I need to buy some and never seem to get around to doing it. :lol:

User avatar
Chef
ZS Donor
ZS Donor
Posts: 3600
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 8:56 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Whatever that one with Bruce Campbell in it was
Location: Behind you, HOT!

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by Chef » Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:57 am

If that tuna is packed in water, replace it with the oil-packed kind. Oil has a lot more calories than water, and has the happy bonus of weighing less than water.

Your setup looks pretty decent to me, as long as you're familiar with all your gear and how it works.

You mention your RV is basically home base. There's a certain aspect of "I'm not coming home" that deserves consideration when assembling a BOB intended to escape from an RV in which you actually live. Got your papers/momentoes etc. together?
Orville Wright did not have a pilot's license.

johndoe
* * *
Posts: 323
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:50 am

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by johndoe » Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:08 am

Chef wrote:If that tuna is packed in water, replace it with the oil-packed kind. Oil has a lot more calories than water, and has the happy bonus of weighing less than water.

Your setup looks pretty decent to me, as long as you're familiar with all your gear and how it works.

You mention your RV is basically home base. There's a certain aspect of "I'm not coming home" that deserves consideration when assembling a BOB intended to escape from an RV in which you actually live. Got your papers/momentoes etc. together?
Good call on the oil packed tuna. I never considered it. As for the gear, since we use the filter, stove etc for hiking, we're very familiar with it. I'm moderately skilled at improvising shelters and basic survival skills. Winter (real winter) is new to me since I'm from the south, so this winter in SD I'm really focusing on learning the appropriate skills.

As for the RV, passports, medical papers, etc. are all in a " portable fireproof" safe ready to go. We don't collect many mementos anymore since we're so space limited, but we have some stuff in a storage unit down south. Plus every month I backup my harddrives on our two notebooks and mail them to my sister for offsite safekeeping.

The RV does add a new dimension to contingency planning. I've scouted out a couple nearby backcountry locations that would be my first option to get away from any threat in town. With the generators (I've been planning a solar system, but that's about 6 months to a year out) we could easily "camp" in luxury for a good while in a localized disaster situation.

User avatar
TacAir
* * * * *
Posts: 8022
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Contact:

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by TacAir » Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:48 am

Looks good. I would want a better FAK for the auto if away from 'civilization' by any great distance.

I would note - about that blanket. I have two of the "Italian" surplus 100% woven wool blankets that roll up and fit into a REI '30 liter' stuff sack (11 x 22 inches) with a bit of room to spare. These blankets weight 5+ pounds and are very nice - we keep two in our RV and I have a set in my GOODie bag. Might be worth a look for your auto kit.

Comms? If you get into trouble out in the hills - will your cell phone always get you help? Might be worth looking at taking some (usually free) classes and getting a ham ticket....

The love the idea of the mobile BOL.....
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability

johndoe
* * *
Posts: 323
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:50 am

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by johndoe » Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:44 pm

TacAir wrote:Looks good. I would want a better FAK for the auto if away from 'civilization' by any great distance.

I would note - about that blanket. I have two of the "Italian" surplus 100% woven wool blankets that roll up and fit into a REI '30 liter' stuff sack (11 x 22 inches) with a bit of room to spare. These blankets weight 5+ pounds and are very nice - we keep two in our RV and I have a set in my GOODie bag. Might be worth a look for your auto kit.

Comms? If you get into trouble out in the hills - will your cell phone always get you help? Might be worth looking at taking some (usually free) classes and getting a ham ticket....

The love the idea of the mobile BOL.....
My wife's a Critical Care Nurse Practitioner and she's assembled a pretty extensive FAK. I'm enrolled in an EMT class come January, and we're both taking a Wilderness EMT upgrade after that, so we're holding off on assembling the final car kit until we've taken the Wilderness class, figuring it'd be worth getting that knowledge first. Until then, though, we have a good kit in the RV that makes it to the car if we're out doing outdoors stuff.

I'm gonna look for those italian blankets, thanks. The ones I have aren't that heavy, and yours sound like a perfect solution. Where did you find yours, if you don't mind me asking?

Coms...we have the SPOT Emergency locator beacon (the orange unit in the GPS picture) as a wilderness "panic button" so to speak. That thing works great. I use it on motorcycle touring and it allows my wife to track my location. Besides that you can send two preprogrammed text messages or emails, and of course, the SOS button that goes right to the GEOS emergency response center, who then routes it to the appropriate SAR/LEO agency. It gets great signal everywhere I've been--my wife has tracked me deep into the desert, down in canyons, in forests and up in the Rockies without issue. Plus for under $10 when you activate the SPOT we purchased the GEOS insurance that pays for up to $100,000 in private SAR services if they determine the government isn't doing enough to get you. From what I read they've hired helicopters to pluck people out of the jungle down in latin america, and boats out in the world's oceans that are far from stable governments. Not a bad deal.

Ham though...maybe I do need to put that on my 'need to acquire skills' list. I always thought it was really involved though. But if it's just a few free classes, it would definitely be worth it.

User avatar
TheFishinMagician
* * *
Posts: 676
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 6:24 pm
Location: S.W. FL

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by TheFishinMagician » Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:46 pm

Looks good! :mrgreen:

I love that Rossi! Great combo with the 410 and 22. Very versatile and compact!
Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Image Image

User avatar
TacAir
* * * * *
Posts: 8022
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:01 pm
Contact:

Re: The Car BOB. Sort of.

Post by TacAir » Fri Nov 19, 2010 4:35 pm

johndoe wrote:
TacAir wrote:Looks good. I would want a better FAK for the auto if away from 'civilization' by any great distance.

I would note - about that blanket. I have two of the "Italian" surplus 100% woven wool blankets that roll up and fit into a REI '30 liter' stuff sack (11 x 22 inches) with a bit of room to spare. These blankets weight 5+ pounds and are very nice - we keep two in our RV and I have a set in my GOODie bag. Might be worth a look for your auto kit.

Comms? If you get into trouble out in the hills - will your cell phone always get you help? Might be worth looking at taking some (usually free) classes and getting a ham ticket....

The love the idea of the mobile BOL.....
My wife's a Critical Care Nurse Practitioner and she's assembled a pretty extensive FAK. I'm enrolled in an EMT class come January, and we're both taking a Wilderness EMT upgrade after that, so we're holding off on assembling the final car kit until we've taken the Wilderness class, figuring it'd be worth getting that knowledge first. Until then, though, we have a good kit in the RV that makes it to the car if we're out doing outdoors stuff.

I'm gonna look for those italian blankets, thanks. The ones I have aren't that heavy, and yours sound like a perfect solution. Where did you find yours, if you don't mind me asking?

Coms...we have the SPOT Emergency locator beacon (the orange unit in the GPS picture) as a wilderness "panic button" so to speak. That thing works great. I use it on motorcycle touring and it allows my wife to track my location. Besides that you can send two preprogrammed text messages or emails, and of course, the SOS button that goes right to the GEOS emergency response center, who then routes it to the appropriate SAR/LEO agency. It gets great signal everywhere I've been--my wife has tracked me deep into the desert, down in canyons, in forests and up in the Rockies without issue. Plus for under $10 when you activate the SPOT we purchased the GEOS insurance that pays for up to $100,000 in private SAR services if they determine the government isn't doing enough to get you. From what I read they've hired helicopters to pluck people out of the jungle down in latin america, and boats out in the world's oceans that are far from stable governments. Not a bad deal.

Ham though...maybe I do need to put that on my 'need to acquire skills' list. I always thought it was really involved though. But if it's just a few free classes, it would definitely be worth it.
LOL

The blankets came from the Army-Navy store on 4th Ave, here in Anchorage....at $22 each, cheaper now here than seen on the web.

There are a ton of suppliers, just search 'surplus wool blanket' - it they don't weigh over 5+ pounds each, keep looking. Many of the OD "USGI suplus" wool blankets on the web are not 100% wool and weigh less than 3.5 pounds.

These specific blanets are slighly larger than USGI surplus 'bed' blankets. If you can get the USGI medical blanets, there are 100% wool and as large as the ones mentioned. The medical blankets run about 3.75 pounds.

THe cleaning tips here are good to follow.

Source examples -
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/n ... x?a=406448" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://www.galaxyarmynavy.com/item-fo-92-625.asp" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

These first sold for under 20USD, some as cheap as 9.50USD, but now run as much as 40USD. Don't know if the price went up due to demand or the dollar tanking. Worth the dough if you can find them. The REI stuff sack is 9USD.

I have found sites playing to people who actually collect military blankets, Odd bunch I suppose and the prices they quote are out of this world - just a word of caution.

If your AO has a 'surplus' store, worth the time to check there.
TacAir - I'd rather be a disappointed pessimist than a horrified optimist
**All my books ** some with a different view of the "PAW". Check 'em out.
Adventures in rice storage//Mod your Esbit for better stability

Post Reply

Return to “Bug Out Gear”