Mock Bug Out: Now considered not a fail

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Defeater
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Mock Bug Out: Now considered not a fail

Post by Defeater » Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:08 pm

Several nights ago I was afforded the opportunity to do a cool mock bugout, as I have seen others attempt on here. I have already spoiled the ending of this through the title, but I learned a few things from this experiment, which I want to share. Basically I took the clothes I had on (a hoodie, T-shirt, jeans - I had the wherewithal to at least swap out my Converse-style canvas sneakers for my Altama jungle combat boots), and my BOB, which is a work in progress, so I will only mention what I used.

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Here is where I was hiking, down a logging road which is literally right next to my house. I decided to go about a couple miles down and set up camp in no particular place. Weather conditions at the outset (7:30pm) were fair. 61 degrees F with a 3 mph wind. My clothing was pretty adequate; I donned a boonie hat from my pack to keep the giant swarms of noseeums away. I still inhaled about half a dozen. Mosquitoes abound in my AO but I drenched myself in DEET, so I was safe on that front. I set down to camp at about 9pm, as it was starting to get dark pretty fast.

The bag: 5.11 Rush 72 loaded to a hair over 40 pounds. This shit was crazy uncomfortable in short order - it is about 3000ci yet has no suspension system. You feel it fast. I've done long walks with it when it was something more like 20 pounds, so this would be where I recommend you keep it, if you have one. If you don't, and you need to do some serious rucking, just avoid it.

Things I used to start a fire: SOG hand axe, Primus PowerLighter, vaselined cotton balls. Not a whole lot to discuss here. The cotton balls are pretty much guaranteed fire in a bag. Anyone who hasn't made themselves up a whole shit-ton of these things is doing themselves a serious disservice. The PowerLighter is awesome and will start basically anything on fire right then (1300 degrees Celsius has that effect - it is basically a tiny butane torch). I have never once got anything to catch fire using a fucking firesteel and it was getting extremely dark so I went the easy way out on this one, sue me.

Things I used to make shelter: Therm-A-Rest Z-lite pad (R size), 6x8 tarpaulin, USGI poncho, USGI poncho liner, ABS plastic tent stakes, 550 cord, Nite Ize Figure 9 carabiner. I have never been a scout and all the camping I can remember was out of the trunk of a car, so this was a crash course in shelter building. I strung up 550 cord between two trees at about 2' height and draped the tarp over it, securing it with stakes, which in effect made a really cheap and shitty pup tent of sorts. The Figure 9 carabiner was great at keeping the line extremely taut. Under it went the Z-lite pad, then the poncho. I don't have any type of sleep system, so the woobie was all I used. In all honesty it was actually pretty comfortable, which I solely attribute to the Z-lite.

Other things: MSR Pocket Rocket stove with Jetboil 4-season fuel canister, GSI stainless steel cup, Mountain House meal (beef stew!), Snow Peak titanium spork. Kick ass setup, lots of people on this site using it, so no reason to go into a lot of detail here. For illumination I used an Energizer brand 6-LED headlamp. On the initial red setting, it's pretty great for using around the camp, and it changes angle, so pretty handy. Unfortunately you have to click through 3 more settings, all of which are bright light, before it goes back to the OFF position, which is annoying. For bug-out situations where light would compromise your security, it would be a lot more than just annoying.

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Lousy picture. You can kind of see the Pocket Rocket and the MH bag.

So, this sounds like it went well, right? Well, it didn't. I got everything squared away, had myself some Mountain House, and laid down about 9:30pm. The NWS says it was 57 degrees out at this time, so I was fairly comfortable even in just a woobie and T-shirt (I had jammed my hoodie into the 10L stuff sack the woobie usually lives in, to service as a pillow). However by 10:30, it had gone down to 52 F, and it was noticeable. Besides that, I was just unable to go to sleep - every tiny sound alerted me. It was pretty goddamn miserable so I just went home - if it had been that I could sleep and it was just cold, or I couldn't sleep and it was warm, I probably would have stayed out.

Key things I guess you could take away from this:
  • Poncho liner is adequate for a quasi-sleeping bag until about 60 degrees F, probably a little less if you have legitimate clothing. Know your AO, particularly the average temperature at a given time of year, and kit up accordingly.
  • You may not be able to crash out and sleep as easily as you could want, so bring headphones and a music player, or earplugs, or even sleeping pills if you have to; in a bug-out situation, you may not know when you can get to rest next, so it is vital that you are able to actually fall off if you have the opportunity to.
  • The Motorola Droid takes horrible pictures in the dark.
  • Some gear that sucks: the Rush 72 (when overloaded), and that Energizer headlamp, if only for the fact that you have to cycle through every single mode.
  • Gear that rules: Primus PowerLighter, Z-lite pad, vaseline and cotton balls, Pocket Rocket.
Last edited by Defeater on Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by knosaj » Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:27 pm

awesome, and honest report.

i sure wouldnt consider it a fail at all. it just lets you know on how you modify your kit to suite your needs. more people should do this and i bet most would have a similar tale.

i often hike for days alone w/o seeing a soul so ive spent a lot of nights out alone. it takes some getting used to. ive woken up several times shouting out "HEY BEAR!" not knowing if anything was even there. -LOL. but personally i wouldnt take sleeping pills or listen music in order to sleep. i want to stay alert, youll get used to it.

instead of hiking, always on the move, ive wanted to hike out, set up a small camp and practice bush craft skills. never have though.

go again asap and let us know how it goes.

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Jester79 » Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:41 pm

knosaj wrote:but personally i wouldnt take sleeping pills or listen music in order to sleep. i want to stay alert, youll get used to it.
+1

Agreed. There are too many things out there that are of potential danger and you need to be able to sense them and react accordingly. When out in an insecure environment, sleeping pills, ear plugs, and the like, are just bad news and intentionally reduce your situational awareness. Lack of SA = BAD. Sleeping out in nature is something that takes getting used to after we have conditioned ourselves to sleeping in our cozy, relatively secure beds.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Woods Walker » Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:01 pm

A pack’s suspension system is my primary consideration when determining its load capacity. 40lb and no suspension system is bad news. Cottonballs/Vaseline combo works very well when combined with a firesteel. On a side note there is nothing wrong with taking the easy way out, heck I use a Bic lighter all the time. The path of least resistance is often the best.

I agree that a poncho liner is marginal at best. I think a seasonably appropriate sleeping bag is needed for the vast majority of people. I fully understand being cold at 52F overnight. People might think cold is only a winter issue but nothing could be farther from the truth. Sleeping in an unfamiliar environment can be challenging. I don’t know anyone who has spent any real time sleeping out who hasn’t been a bit spooked at one time or another. I recommend experience over some of your suggestions like pills etc.

This is a great post as the best learning often comes from failure.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by whisk.e.rebellion » Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:07 pm

Thanks for the awesomely honest write up. I much prefer to hear about gear failures than successes. At least with the failures, I know what to avoid.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by AKFTW » Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:14 pm

Well I guess I will be the odd man out here and recommend some melatonin. It's basically the hormone that makes you tired. It doesn't knock you out or anything, just makes it easier for you to get to sleep. Situational Awareness is key, but being so tired you can't function isn't an option either. Set some trip-wire around your camp, even if it's just really tight fishing line that would cause someone to stumble. But overall, I would make sure you don't have to bug out alone, and just take shifts sleeping.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Fire » Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:48 pm

be aware that some people can wake up even under the influence of heavy sleeping pills- I recently did while camping at my booth at a tiny ren fest in KS- the security guy, who was unaware of my being there, and whos passage a bit too close by had triggered my sudden awakening, was quite startled when I sat up and grabbed a rather large bearded axe... he had a maglite, and was glad that I took no further action upon realizing who he was.... he did give me quite a wide berth the rest of the weekend though- so you might test out any sleep aid, with the help of a friend or an alarm clock in an adjacent room, to see how well you can wake up if you should need to....,.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Boromokot » Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:06 am

wow, awesome post. and good to hear that the rush 72 hour pack sucks when it's loaded to that cap. Mine's pushing 30lbs and i still find it comfortable, but i've never done too long of a walk with it. Did the mosquito repellent work the whole time? The last time i went camping, we practically bathed in the stuff, and it didn't do much but smell.

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Mister Dark » Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:18 am

Excellent post and gear test. The only way to know if gear works is to get out and test it, whether in the backyard or out on the trail.

Only thing I would recommend is possibly starting camp a little earlier - if you only had the poncho and liner, but had time to build some kind of extra shelter, you would possibly been ok for the night. But even a simple lean-to takes time and a lot of material, and nothing is more annoying than working against the clock trying to set up camp. But then again, if you really were bugging out, you would be making miles, and too tired at the end of the day to build a lean to... Ok, I'll shut up now.


But I still think it was a great post!

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by epirider » Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:46 am

I like the post too. All I can say is you DO get used to sleeping outdoors. As far as sleep aids, be careful. drugs like Ambien (for example) people have been known to sleep walk, drive, clean and all sorts of crazy stuff. Prolly not the best thing in a bug out.

And I have my Spear loaded to about 60 lbs and none of it is fun, but it shouldnt be painful. Get yourself a good pack with a good suspension. It will make your life much better. I go on 5 mile walks with mine on. Good way to stay in shape and you are able to adjust your suspension and straps accordingly before you have to bug out for real.

I would not say it was a fail - it was a opportunity for adjustment and reconsideration - but not a fail. Fail = not coming home - ever. :shock:
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Blackdog » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:17 am

1. Good on ya for stepping out.

2. If no one got hurt and you learned something then no way was this a fail.

Poncho liner is adequate for a quasi-sleeping bag until about 60 degrees F, probably a little less if you have legitimate clothing.

With 20 years of sleeping rough with a poncho liner under my belt I will go way out on a feather ruffling limb and say that I can't think of a realistic scenario where a ponch liner is better than a sleeping bag especially now that there are so many SB options that pack down so small. Back when Dinosaurs walked the earth and I was running a ponch liner there was really no expectation of getting more than a couple of hours shut eye at a time anyway what with security, radio watch, and the general business at hand. If it was cold (real cold) we might take one bag per 3 people with the theory being that only one out of three would be sleeping even at the best of times. The only good reason for taking a poncho liner that I could see was that as your ruck would be jam packed with the tools of the trade there was for the most part no room for a bag and a liner was better than nothing. And your right, at the end of summer temps in the 50s seem down right cold. In my view a good bag is right up there in the survival gear pecking order and a poncho liner is, well, better than nothing.

Know your AO, particularly the average temperature at a given time of year, and kit up accordingly.

Roger that.

You may not be able to crash out and sleep as easily as you could want, so bring headphones and a music player, or earplugs, or even sleeping pills if you have to; in a bug-out situation, you may not know when you can get to rest next, so it is vital that you are able to actually fall off if you have the opportunity to.

I can't suggest any of these solutions, the key is to learn to sleep out and about (which you have started to do it looks like). In reality if I don't get out there often enough I find it hard to crash out on the first night. At the best of times I am up several times during the night for whatever reason, mostly because of a growling dog doing her job. If you get bone tired you will sleep but the key is to make yourself as comfortable as possible both mentally (practice) and physically (propper gear for your environment). A guy in Hawaii will most likely get by just fine with a poncho liner but a guy in say Washington State will soon find himself sucking wind with the same ponch liner. For the most part don't expect to get 8 hours of straight shut eye, like missing a meal now and again it won't kill you to break a night up into a couple of sleep cycles.

Some gear that sucks: the (when overloaded), and that Energizer headlamp, if only for the fact that you have to cycle through every single mode.
Gear that rules: Primus PowerLighter, Z-lite pad, vaseline and cotton balls, Pocket Rocket


Again entering the feather ruffling zone, every time I see a "3 day assult type pack" loaded to the gills with maybe a few pouches strapped on for good measure I shudder. When I went to Afghanistan the first time I picked up a Camelbak Motherload to haul my junk between base camps and save my good pack from the wear and tear. For this it was fine but when I gave it a go at actual gear humping I found it to pretty much suck ass. Being not the brightest bulb I later picked up a London Bridge frameless assult type pack and guess what? I think that one sucks for moving from point A to B with any load in it also. Both packs suffered from the bowling ball with straps effect. I know that there is a love thing going with the 3 day assult of all stripes but I think for real life there are a ton of better options to include (not my first choice) that ancient old pal of mine the ALICE with frame. A functional suspension and hip belt will go a long way towards making real life a little better (something the ALICE lacks is a good hip belt). I salute you for giving this pack a real life test and posting your findings.

I really don't get why head lamps always start at their highest settings, it is annoying at best. I really wish they would start at the lowest setting and work up to the higher settings. What I try to do, if I don't have my head up my arse is to cover the light until I can cycle to a low setting.

Again good on ya for stepping out of the comfort zone, It can only get better with practice (barring that first time out in a side way blowing sleet storm if you know what I mean). Keep it up.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Defeater » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:50 am

Well, thanks to everyone who has commented thus far. I almost didn't post anything at all, feeling that I would possibly get laughed off the site for crying about being too cold or scared of the dark, or something. I really did feel very browbeaten to have retired to home after only four hours or so.

I didn't make it clear before: the rationale behind my gear selection, is simply that it is all I have. Bug out gear wise, I do not own much of anything else besides what I brought with me on this here campout. I have now learned that these deficiencies should probably be addressed sooner rather than later, and that a poncho liner may only be adequate for a nap during the daytime (in the summer... if it's not raining).

And as for the pack, well, I bought it right at the outset of my foray into ZS (and with it practically the entire spectrum of topics ZS covers). It is basically a novice mistake that is now starting to haunt me, now that added experience necessitates more equipment. I have taken it on several 5+ milers before, but it was closer to 30 pounds at the time. Anyways, that Rush 72 is more than likely going to turn into one of these bad boys - tried one on and did various other naughty touchings with it at the TT home store, and loved it - and the headlamp is probably just going to get downgraded into a working-on-the-car affair.

As for the sleep thing... I guess I will just have to keep working at it. I can basically get this same campout experience right in my front yard - I don't exactly live in the 'burbs, take that first landscape picture and drop a house into the frame and you're basically looking at my neighborhood - so I think I will do it a little bit closer to the homestead next time.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by the_alias » Tue Aug 31, 2010 5:04 am

As for the sleep thing... I guess I will just have to keep working at it. I can basically get this same campout experience right in my front yard - I don't exactly live in the 'burbs, take that first landscape picture and drop a house into the frame and you're basically looking at my neighborhood - so I think I will do it a little bit closer to the homestead next time.
Just comes with being comfortable being out, everyone gets spooked now and then. People still give me weird looks when I say I hike and camp by myself :lol:
As BlackDog says you can't expect the same nights sleep. I find I always need to get up and piss at 2am when out camping, never at home of course. I think its a survival mechanism, keeps you alert and ready. I've also had the best sleep ever on a Dartmoor hillside at about 1 in the afternoon. Catches up on the sleep you missed, naps are great!
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Blackdog » Tue Aug 31, 2010 6:17 am

Defeater wrote:Well, thanks to everyone who has commented thus far. I almost didn't post anything at all, feeling that I would possibly get laughed off the site for crying about being too cold or scared of the dark, or something. I really did feel very browbeaten to have retired to home after only four hours or so.

I didn't make it clear before: the rationale behind my gear selection, is simply that it is all I have. Bug out gear wise, I do not own much of anything else besides what I brought with me on this here campout. I have now learned that these deficiencies should probably be addressed sooner rather than later, and that a poncho liner may only be adequate for a nap during the daytime (in the summer... if it's not raining).

And as for the pack, well, I bought it right at the outset of my foray into ZS (and with it practically the entire spectrum of topics ZS covers). It is basically a novice mistake that is now starting to haunt me, now that added experience necessitates more equipment. I have taken it on several 5+ milers before, but it was closer to 30 pounds at the time. Anyways, that Rush 72 is more than likely going to turn into one of these bad boys - tried one on and did various other naughty touchings with it at the TT home store, and loved it - and the headlamp is probably just going to get downgraded into a working-on-the-car affair.

As for the sleep thing... I guess I will just have to keep working at it. I can basically get this same campout experience right in my front yard - I don't exactly live in the 'burbs, take that first landscape picture and drop a house into the frame and you're basically looking at my neighborhood - so I think I will do it a little bit closer to the homestead next time.
Everybody starts with not much (knowlege experience and gear) or junk that for some reason just doesn't work for them (I can't figure out if picking gear is worse now with internet rangers throwing their extensive knowlege around or back in the pre-internet day when only your Uncle Slayton was throwing his extensive knowlege around). Round about the dark ages I stared with a canvas Boy Scout pack and wool blanket that I hauled around for years (making plenty of mistakes along the way, still making them from time to time for that matter) and have taken more than one dead end gear street over the years since then also.

For the TT pack, I am glad you got to try it on (hopefully with some weight in it) because fit is 1/2 the battle. With all the options out there I don't see the need to pump a zillion bucks into this but now you have one more piece of personal experience to base you choices on.

Now, re-lock and re-load, dump everything that does not have anything to do with sleeping out and give it another go knowing what you know now (maybe just the addition of a wool blanket would help a lot, for myself, I sleep much better if I just have my "weenie boy" pillow). Start earlier in the day and get a good shelter and sleeping area going and crack the "bug out sleeping blues" because after the first couple of times it will get easier both mentally and physically to pull this stunt off. Don't forget that the chances of you sleeping the whole night thru are slim and I think this is pretty normal.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Blackdog » Tue Aug 31, 2010 6:24 am

the_alias wrote:
As for the sleep thing... I guess I will just have to keep working at it. I can basically get this same campout experience right in my front yard - I don't exactly live in the 'burbs, take that first landscape picture and drop a house into the frame and you're basically looking at my neighborhood - so I think I will do it a little bit closer to the homestead next time.
Just comes with being comfortable being out, everyone gets spooked now and then. People still give me weird looks when I say I hike and camp by myself :lol:
As BlackDog says you can't expect the same nights sleep. I find I always need to get up and piss at 2am when out camping, never at home of course. I think its a survival mechanism, keeps you alert and ready. I've also had the best sleep ever on a Dartmoor hillside at about 1 in the afternoon. Catches up on the sleep you missed, naps are great!
Naps in the field are one of natures true wonders for sure. Yes the 2 am piss call especially when it is cold and raining are the bee's knees.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Panzer » Tue Aug 31, 2010 7:55 am

Sounds like a win to me. You tried out your gear and you found out what didn't work. Good job!

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by WY_Not » Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:11 am

Can't tell from the pics but did you build a lean-too and reflector for the fire? Reflector opposite the fire to reflect the heat back at you and a lean-to behind/over of you to keep the heat from getting to far past you and escaping? From the looks of the first pic, you were in a heavily wooded area so there should have been plenty of material to build them. Would have made things much more comfortable.

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EDIT - Just reread the OP. Looks like you did have a lean-to set up. Still, the reflector would make a big difference.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by northernxposure » Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:32 am

Fantastic review, failure and all!

Great to see some real life experience. Sounds like that RUSH pack needs some structure on the back panel to stiffen it up some. Do they make a HPDE framesheet for it? If it's around 20" or so tall, you may be able to fold your Z-Lite into a backpanel and get a little more structure back there for you.

I now you've settled on a TT pack for an upgrade, but with the 50% off deals on G1 Kifaru gear, I'd be taking a hard look at one of their packs - and this is from a non-Kifaru guy. I find it very, very difficult to resist ordering an EMR (have no need for one, but man that price is good...)

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Blackdog » Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:52 am

northernxposure wrote:Fantastic review, failure and all!

I now you've settled on a TT pack for an upgrade, but with the 50% off deals on G1 Kifaru gear, I'd be taking a hard look at one of their packs - and this is from a non-Kifaru guy. I find it very, very difficult to resist ordering an EMR (have no need for one, but man that price is good...)

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I didn't mention it in this thread because I don't want to be hawkin stuff I haven't used, but I could not resist the 50% off and dropped the hammer on a Pointman, which technically I don't %100 really need.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Dooms » Tue Aug 31, 2010 9:36 am

Some things I noticed (constructive criticisms/helpful tips?):

1. Even with a man-made ground pad, it never hurts to put some more padding between you and the cold earth. Soft pine boughs, dry leaves and grass, maybe even make a raised bed if you've got the time and materials. Anything to help get you further off the ground. Just make sure that whatever you use isn't sopping wet or bug infested. :wink:

2. If you can't get Vaseline impregnated cotton balls to light with a firesteel, you are doing something wrong. Either poor technique with the firesteel or way too much Vaseline. You only need a tiny bit of Vaseline, the final product shouldn't feel greasy to the touch.

3. 40lb BOB.....is that including firearms and ammo too? With out seeing everything you've brought, I'm thinking that's a bit on the heavy side. You might want to take a look through your gear and see where you can knock some weight out. I mean, if I allowed myself 40lbs for a BOB I would have been a lot more comfortable than you were.

4. You had a fire made, yet you also ran a stove for boiling water. Maybe it's just me, but I see that as a little odd. I mean, if I was only boiling water for Mountain House meals, I would have just boiled the water right on the fire. For me, the stove only comes into play when I would have difficulty cooking over a fire for one reason or another (like if everything is water logged, if I don't want to attract attention with smoke, if I'm cooking on the move, if I'm Leave No Trace camping/hiking, ect)

5. I wouldn't have taken the hoody off for use as a pillow. Even if it was too warm for it during the day, at night it can start to get pretty cold....especially after you've been somewhat motionless for a while. That hoody would have helped to keep your core warm, thereby most likely improving your comfort level. If anything, I would have used the t-shirt for pillow duty and worn the hoody. Especially if the t-shirt was somewhat damp from sweat after hiking. (Sometimes it helps to change into a new dry t-shirt and new dry underwear before going to sleep outdoors. I find having dry clean cloth next my skin helps keep me warmer.)

6. It seems like you were somewhat rushed because of it getting dark. Next time I would try to get out there earlier so you already have camp setup before it gets dark. While that might not always be possible in a SHTF/Bug Out scenario, for your first couple practice times out, you want to be as relaxed as possible and you don't want to be rushing to beat the clock. You might not realize it, but hiking and camping, when you aren't used to it, can be a somewhat stressful change to the body and mind. Take the time to relax, acclimate yourself to the rhythm of the woods, and get yourself out of "hustle and bustle" mode you were in while setting up camp. Maybe make a little cup of tea and enjoy sipping it while you watch the sun set. It might help you to sleep better. :)

All in all, I wouldn't call it a fail. There are some aspects to this kind of activity that can only be taught through experience. With time and practice you'll learn new things, become more comfortable, and figure out what works for you and what doesn't. 8)

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by elkhills » Tue Aug 31, 2010 10:11 am

That which does not kill me can only make me stronger!
This "Fail" is all WIN. You got out and learned something. Next time, you will be better prepared, and you will go farther.
Re. your sleep system:
You might want to look into the Military MSS, you can find them brand new for $150.
If that's too bulky and/or expensive, the Snugpak Jungle Bag
is said to pack down to about the size of a coconut, and sell for around $50.
If that's too bulky and/or expensive, you could at least add in some extra layers like a Thermolite Bivy for $20.
Throw in a cheap space blanket to put up as a fire reflector... toasty warm + full belly= sleepy me :)

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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by PistolPete » Tue Aug 31, 2010 10:30 am

Great exercise! Thanks for sharing it with us. You fared better than I did on my first mock bug out. My only good flashlight was attached to a pistol and my only blanket was an emergency blanket. I did not get much sleep that night, even with having a fire and it not getting very chilly.

Now I've got a wool blanket and two good flashlights in my BOB. :-)

But we don't really realize the limits until we try. On a recent hike I carried 52lbs instead of my normal 38 in my BOB and I was surprised how much more worn out I was at the end. I can walk forever in a 40lb pack but that extra 10lbs made a much bigger difference than I would have guessed. And a pack with a frame makes a big difference when you've got more than 30 lbs on your back. But even with the pack you have, try to cinch up the waist belt tight to ride on the top of your hips, that takes some weight off your shoulders.

Awesome write up!
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by Woods Walker » Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:40 am

Blackdog wrote:
northernxposure wrote:Fantastic review, failure and all!

I now you've settled on a TT pack for an upgrade, but with the 50% off deals on G1 Kifaru gear, I'd be taking a hard look at one of their packs - and this is from a non-Kifaru guy. I find it very, very difficult to resist ordering an EMR (have no need for one, but man that price is good...)

NXP
I didn't mention it in this thread because I don't want to be hawkin stuff I haven't used, but I could not resist the 50% off and dropped the hammer on a Pointman, which technically I don't %100 really need.
I think you will like the Pointman. Given the G1 50% off sale a Kifaru might also work for the OP. Maybe a ZXR, MMR or EMR.
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Re: Mock Bug Out: Fail!

Post by EATME » Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:42 pm

Nice post and feedback. I've still only been car camping. This makes me want to pack out now. Thanks.
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