The shelter debate.

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

User avatar
Hooligan
* * *
Posts: 540
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 2:47 am
Location: Las Vegas

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Hooligan » Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:17 am

I am a traditional tent guy. I don't have much in the way of trees in the desert. And i don't really like scorpions spiders or snakes sleeping with me.

User avatar
GunsUp
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 843
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:44 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 days later, resident evil
Location: TX

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by GunsUp » Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:56 pm

I have tried the large tarp as well as the tarp and bivy combo and didn't like them.
Hammocks are not an option in my AO (west texas high desert plains, no trees)

I spent two night with a USGI bivy under a USGI poncho. I got raped by bugs one hot summer night and froze my ass off one cold fall night. The wind shifts often here and I went to sleep protected from the wind and woke up with my poncho acting as a wind sock. Where the cold air blew over the bivy it became ice cold and if I compressed my sleeping bag against it I froze my ass off.

After these two bad experiences (and a mediocre experience with a large tarp in fair bug free weather) I decided to go with a backpacking tent. I have the Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2 and I love it. It weighs under 4lbs total, but I have enough room to sit up in it and change clothes or eat and enough room for me and all my gear (or me and one other intimate friend). It is also bug free and dry (it stayed dry in heavy rainfall with 40 MPH wind gusts). The drawbacks are that it takes a bit longer to setup than a tarp (but not much really) and getting in and out of my boots is a pain in the mud.

I am very intrigued by the tipi style tents, but after my investment in my current shelter, I'm not intrigued enough t buy another.

User avatar
Jamie
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 9345
Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:06 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: DOTD04, Special Dead, Shaun of the Dead, 28 ______ Later
Location: Adirondacks, NY
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Jamie » Wed Mar 31, 2010 9:09 pm

theclockwork wrote:After years of being a worker for the homeless, I will give you a really good bit of advice. Go find a homeless camp in your area and see what they do.
Why?
"I don't want to survive. I want to live. " - Captain B. McCrea

Image
My Blog and website, dealing largely with my writing projects...I've published two novels, "Here Be Monsters" and "Caretakers", along with a pair of eBooks, "Mickey Slips" and "Bound for Home"...check them out!

Zombies And SlimJims
* * *
Posts: 369
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 3:33 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead
Zombieland
Night of the Living Dead
28 Days Later
28 Weeks Later
Dawn of the Dead
Location: Southington, CT
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Zombies And SlimJims » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:04 pm

I'm a traditional tent guy myself. I love the idea of the hammock but for some reason I could never shake the idea of feeling like a sitting duck..or like a speed bag for an angry animal. I know nothing would probably ever bother with it, but it'd always be in the back of my mind.


Somewhat off topic, I happen to think that damn spider is cute. Call me a weirdo, but I'm a big softy when it comes to creepy crawlies...I'd gladly let the thing hang out in a teepee with me..just not..on me.
Image

vlad_tepes
* * *
Posts: 560
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2009 4:03 am
Location: AZ

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by vlad_tepes » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:45 pm

theclockwork wrote:After years of being a worker for the homeless, I will give you a really good bit of advice. Go find a homeless camp in your area and see what they do.
Something tells me that your years of service in that capacity have severely compromised your senses. Like maybe all of them... :lol:

While this tent is intended for keeping mosquitoes and bugs at bay, it is cheap, light and easy enough to deploy that I am considering testing one out. A poncho thrown over the top and secured would help keep the wind and rain out. Definitely not meant for inclement weather but, hey, I'm in Phoenix.
alwayswandering wrote:The simple fact is, it's just very impolite to kill people.
bonanacrom wrote:It's not how much food you have in your house it's how bad the people without want to take it from you.
ImageImage Credit goes to Morbid_Mistress
Victory or Valhalla.

User avatar
Abacus
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 3511
Joined: Wed Jul 04, 2007 12:27 pm
Location: Denver

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Abacus » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:48 pm

Living in Texas, where the don't really have weather, or seasons, it was either basha or hammock.

Having moved to the fabulous state of Colorado, an actual tent became necessary for camping in the high country above the treeline.

I love Colorado, but all this cold weather kit did have the effect of making my bergen a LOT heavier.
ImageImage

Zombies And SlimJims
* * *
Posts: 369
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 3:33 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shaun of the Dead
Zombieland
Night of the Living Dead
28 Days Later
28 Weeks Later
Dawn of the Dead
Location: Southington, CT
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Zombies And SlimJims » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:54 pm

vlad_tepes wrote:While this tent is intended for keeping mosquitoes and bugs at bay, it is cheap, light and easy enough to deploy that I am considering testing one out.
THANK YOU! I've seen tents like this, but every time I ended up following link trails to where they're sold it would be from somewhere in Europe, and they either wouldn't ship over seas, or the prices we're ridiculously expensive. This is definitely getting tossed in the back of my car!
Image

User avatar
DaveJohns
* * *
Posts: 735
Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2008 2:50 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: C-SPAN!
Location: N.Alabama

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by DaveJohns » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:57 pm

Having played around with a number of different tent setups, I finally settled on a Henry Shires Tarptent. I have the Cloudburst, and just ordered the Double Rainbow. Super lightweight, bug free, not so amazingly good in the rain or heavy snow, but did I mention lightweight?
"It could be that the purpose of my life is simply to serve as a warning to others"

KJ4MVP



My FAK
My BoB
My stuff for sale!

I survived LA Camp and Shoot 09

User avatar
Osiris Risen
* * * *
Posts: 964
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 3:24 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: The first three Romero movies, Dance of the Dead, Versus, Flight of the Living Dead (Zombies on a Plane), and most anything else really.
Location: Beaufort, SC

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Osiris Risen » Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:17 pm

vlad_tepes wrote: While this tent is intended for keeping mosquitoes and bugs at bay, it is cheap, light and easy enough to deploy that I am considering testing one out. A poncho thrown over the top and secured would help keep the wind and rain out. Definitely not meant for inclement weather but, hey, I'm in Phoenix.
It folds down into a giant disc, which would probably be really obnoxious to carry for any length of time.
Never trust a corpse.

vlad_tepes
* * *
Posts: 560
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2009 4:03 am
Location: AZ

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by vlad_tepes » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:54 am

Osiris Risen wrote:
vlad_tepes wrote: While this tent is intended for keeping mosquitoes and bugs at bay, it is cheap, light and easy enough to deploy that I am considering testing one out. A poncho thrown over the top and secured would help keep the wind and rain out. Definitely not meant for inclement weather but, hey, I'm in Phoenix.
It folds down into a giant disc, which would probably be really obnoxious to carry for any length of time.

Not so bad in the trunk of your car and based on the construction it may collapse even further if you twist hard enough.
alwayswandering wrote:The simple fact is, it's just very impolite to kill people.
bonanacrom wrote:It's not how much food you have in your house it's how bad the people without want to take it from you.
ImageImage Credit goes to Morbid_Mistress
Victory or Valhalla.

User avatar
ZombieGranny
* * * * *
Posts: 7382
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 2:53 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: eh - heck with it, I'm not leaving - I like it here, and the regular folks like me being here.
Location: PNW

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by ZombieGranny » Thu Apr 01, 2010 1:07 pm

...
Last edited by ZombieGranny on Mon Sep 15, 2014 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
In my day, we didn't have virtual reality.
If a one-eyed razorback barbarian warrior was chasing you with an ax, you just had to hope you could outrun him.
-
Preps buy us time. Time to learn how and time to remember how. Time to figure out what is a want, what is a need.

argyre
* *
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:49 pm

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by argyre » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:35 pm

This topic is so completely dependent on where you are.
Early backpacking experiences in New England, I waffled between carrying no shelter (MANY shelters - big log lean-to's that sleep a dozen or more - along the older trails like the Appalachian and the Long Trail, to one of the sturdy Everest style mountain tents that Eureka used to make (heavy as hell).

Tents continued to be useful camping in soggy/snowy Oregon.

Backpacking in the Sierras in summer - carried a North Face mountaineering tent, and dumped it at the first opportunity. The rest of the trip, rolled out the original, inexpensive Sierra Designs "bivy sack".
This was simply a rectangular envelope, one surfcae breathable, one waterproof, one end open, with a drawstring. Grommets on all four corners, and two more in the middle of both top edges.
Waterproof side down for most conditions, top was enough to keep dew/mist/drizzle from getting your downbag soggy at all. If it decided to really rain, roll it over and have the waterproof side up.
If you wanted it more tent-like, you could stake out the corners and tie the grommet on the edge of the head opening to a tree, your pack frame, a hiking stick.

This was my primary shelter for many years of backpacking. But I could spend a month in the Sierras and see 5 minutes of rain. YMMV.

When i started doing a lot of desert camping, even car based, I tended to still sleep outside as much as possible - hey, i'm a sky&stars junky...

Girlfriends & later a wife has changed that, mostly. I have a silly collection of backpacking and mountaineering tents, ranging from the Sierra Designs Clip 3, a Tiros mountaineering, the 4 person mountaineering, a three person free standing 3 season, tarps galore.
The 4 person gets the most use when car based. And has held up through over 15 years of more than a month of hard use a year in some very harsh and windy places.
And I have a variety of very large and wind tolerant shade structures (made out of things like full sized parachutes, mainsails for 80 foot racers, etc.) for desert use, none of which is backpackable.

Most of the places I am likely to bug out to would NOT be hammock friendly. But then, I'm not hammock friendly. I found that the earth-toned bivy sack tucked under some brush was extremely low-profile, and would probably be my bugout preference.
Mag Pouch Kit Contest Entry - French Press based: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 0#p1275085
NEF/H&R Survivor Handi-Rifle survival kit: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 14&t=72375

User avatar
Ghost_Jaws
*
Posts: 96
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 8:55 am
Location: Southern AZ

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Ghost_Jaws » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:00 am

Thanks for the opinions and stories folks, I know it definitely depends on location which is why I mentioned that I am in the high desert :)

There are a lot of trade-offs with all this stuff. I like the hammock idea, but don't like that my gear is outside. I like the regular tent, but don't like needing to clear rocks and worrying about tracking in dirt/water. I like the tipi but don't like bugs. Guess in the end you kinda gotta figure out what the least aggrivating thing would be, and go from there.
Image

The artist formerly known as Agent_Jaws. RIP old profile...

Jaws' Junk:
BOB testing thread
Underwear thread
Knife & Tool thread
IFAK post
My Site

“A black belt only covers two inches of your ass. You have to cover the rest.” - Royce Gracie

emman714
* *
Posts: 156
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 2:48 am

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by emman714 » Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:22 am

DaveJohns wrote:Having played around with a number of different tent setups, I finally settled on a Henry Shires Tarptent. I have the Cloudburst, and just ordered the Double Rainbow. Super lightweight, bug free, not so amazingly good in the rain or heavy snow, but did I mention lightweight?
You'll love it.

I have had the Double Rainbow for over a year. I almost sold it to get a TarpTipi, but then I asked myself "Why?".

The Tarptent for ME has many more advantages. It's ultra-lightweight (just under three pounds with stakes and pole). It's a grey neutral color. It'll sleep two or three in a pinch. It packs small. It will outlast any tarp material as long as you take care of it.
The double rainbow can be free-standing or staked. If you are worried about snow, two trekking poles or sticks can be setup under each vestibule for addeds support. It's dual entry, Two or Thre TALL people can comfortable sit up inside of it. It has dual zipped vestibules.(which can be completely rolled up for ventalation or stargazing. If it's colder you can buy an optional liner for only 30 bucks more.

Most importantly, ITS ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT.
Scientia Est Potentia

User avatar
MyDogMike
* * *
Posts: 357
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:25 pm
Location: PA

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by MyDogMike » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:33 am

txKingfisher wrote:
Ghost_Jaws wrote: I really like the idea of the Tipi-style shelters due to the space and utility with an internal stove, I just hate when this guy shows up:

Image

I mean the poor guy was missing a leg and just wanted to hang out in our shade, but still...
I'm all for treading lightly and being a responsible steward of the land, but if that thing comes near me Imma fuck it up.
Yup, when there are creepy crawlers as big as your state bird, it's time to rethink your strategy.

User avatar
ZombieSoldier01
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 2810
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Coastal area of Georgia (Ludowici)
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by ZombieSoldier01 » Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:01 am

i sleep in this with my wife, 3 kids, boxer, and weiner dog with room left to spare. apparently its a 12-14 person tent, but i personally think its like a 8-10 person... but whatever. anyways i have no issues with critters of any sort other then the dogs. it weighs about 15 pounds, fits into a gym style bag. again although its kinda large compared to what most will use its about a 5-7 minute to put up or take down and works for our needs.

Image
Image

"Zombies... Coming to eat a friend near you.."

argyre
* *
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:49 pm

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by argyre » Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:02 pm

Ghost Jaws,

The solution that seems to fit your requirements would be a standard free standing tent (i.e. one of the ones with the tension, geodesic or other frame that you can assemble, then pick it up and move it, hold it over your head to shake out the bugs and debris before packing it up, and which has a significant sized vestibule, by the door, so that you can have a spot ot put on and remove your footwear before getting inside.

Me, the only time I go in the tent is wehn i am going to sleep, or if I am weathered in completely.

Tents and bathrooms share some similarities - for some people, it is a place to spend a lot of time, and so they want it big and roomy, and for others, they spend the minimum amount of time necessary there, and want it to be just sufficient for its purpose.
Mag Pouch Kit Contest Entry - French Press based: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 0#p1275085
NEF/H&R Survivor Handi-Rifle survival kit: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 14&t=72375

Dr D
* *
Posts: 224
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 10:13 am

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Dr D » Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:17 pm

argyre wrote:This topic is so completely dependent on where you are.
Early backpacking experiences in New England, I waffled between carrying no shelter (MANY shelters - big log lean-to's that sleep a dozen or more - along the older trails like the Appalachian and the Long Trail, to one of the sturdy Everest style mountain tents that Eureka used to make (heavy as hell).
Off topic here but those lean-to these days, don't make it your plan to crash in them. I've come up to them packed before, you'd be sol without your own shelter of some sort. Unless you wanted to get extremely friendly with somebody there.

And I agree, shelter, sleeping options and clothes are very dependent on the area you operate and your own comfort level.

argyre
* *
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:49 pm

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by argyre » Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:43 pm

Dr. D.,

Okay, I have to 'fess up.... The last time I was backpacking in Vermont or the eastern U.S. was prior to 1974. There were a LOT fewer people out in the wilderness at that time.

Hell, you could safely drink water from streams all over the East and West at that time.

And I would never depend on existing hut/shelter infrastructure.
Mag Pouch Kit Contest Entry - French Press based: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 0#p1275085
NEF/H&R Survivor Handi-Rifle survival kit: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 14&t=72375

Travatron
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:40 pm

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Travatron » Fri Apr 02, 2010 2:28 pm

If you both carry one, you could check out an Ecotat system, only place they're available now is on ebay http://cgi.ebay.com/Ecotat-Universal-Sh ... 4839fbab9d" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It's either 1 small 1-person tent or you can combine 2 to make a 3 person tent. My wife and I use them in our BOB and for backpacking and love them.

User avatar
Dogan
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 4940
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 10:17 am
Location: The Mythical State of Jefferson

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Dogan » Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:58 pm

Ghost_Jaws wrote: Image
These can be cooked and eaten like tiny crabs or lobsters, and are actually quite good.
goofygurl wrote:Dogan – In charge of all things fucked up
Are you ready to die, John Walker?| CLAPTRAP!
Your lucky number has been disconnected.|ASCII biohazard symbol: ☣
Winner of the May/June 2013 ZS Postal Match

User avatar
ZombieSoldier01
ZS Member
ZS Member
Posts: 2810
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Coastal area of Georgia (Ludowici)
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by ZombieSoldier01 » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:09 pm

quackfiend wrote:
Ghost_Jaws wrote: Image
These can be cooked and eaten like tiny crabs or lobsters, and are actually quite good.
what the hell kind of spider is that anyways?

"Zombies... Coming to eat a friend near you.."

User avatar
Jeriah
ZS Lifetime Member
ZS Lifetime Member
Posts: 18722
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 4:12 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Original Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead 04, and 28 Days Later are my top three, in that order.
Location: Chicago, IL
Contact:

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Jeriah » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:30 pm

I have used traditional tents exclusively, save for a few nights in dry climates sleeping in my sleeping bag in the open. They're my baseline, but lately I have been considering other options.

One thing to remember is that what works well when you're CHOOSING to go camping, may not be what works well when you're FORCED to. What works when it's a nice weekend to go backpacking may get you killed in the dead of winter or the hottest part of summer. That being said, there's no substitute for getting out there and trying stuff out.

My wife has a larger, 2-person tent that's too heavy for backpacking but perfect for car camping. This is what we use 90% of the time. Steph's actually more hard core than I am when it comes to the buggy, sweaty, muddy part of camping than I am.

Some times tents have failed me: at Knob Creek, it was far too muddy to pitch a tent. Would have been just as bad with anything else on the ground, but a hammock would have worked.

ZCON, we used the tent but it was hot, and the ground was rocky and heavily sloped. Again, a hammock would have been better.

For both of these reasons I am considering a hammock when funds allow. Assuming Hennessey.
Image

User avatar
Hooligan
* * *
Posts: 540
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 2:47 am
Location: Las Vegas

Re: The shelter debate.

Post by Hooligan » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:39 pm

I would really like to be able to use a hammock. Just the lack of trees in my area prevent it.

Post Reply

Return to “Bug Out Gear”