Shiner's B.O.B. (Updated 8-28-2008) Pics!

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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Shiner86
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Shiner's B.O.B. (Updated 8-28-2008) Pics!

Post by Shiner86 » Sun Nov 25, 2007 11:32 pm

EDIT: BUG OUT BAG UPDATED 8-28-2008 :D
http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi ... 91#p703891" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

EDIT: BUG OUT BAG UPDATED 2-6-2008. :D
http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopi" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... ht=#533179


Yep. That's it. My Bug Out Bag.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03481.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

The front pouch is reserved for trauma supplies.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03482.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

One Israeli Bandage, 3 rolls of Kerlix, 1 military field dressing, 1 triangular bandage, 1 combat application tourniquet, burn gel, scissors, medical tape, an asherman chest seal, 2 ace bandages and non-latex gloves. I've got a larger roll of durapore medical tape somewhere in my bag but forgot to photograph it.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03483.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

Note the LED flashlight that I forgot to photograph anywhere else. It's really pretty hardcore.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03486.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

This is my bag's main compartment.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03487.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

The food. Here I've got beef enchiladas from an MRE, yellow and wild rice pilaf from an MRE, a fig bar from an MRE, wheat snack bread from an MRE, a ziploc baggy full of slim jims and granola bars and drink mixes and condiments, 2 high calorie bars, 4 clif bars, a 3600 mainstay brick, 3 packages of rice based oral electrolyte mix, and 2 plastic sporks.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03488.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

My basic IFAK, a larger military field dressing, a rescue mask, wet wipes, camp soap, 2 light sticks, a hairbrush, deodorant, a mirror, binoculars, a sam splint, duct tape wrapped around an old giftcard, write in the rain pen and notepad, a windup radio, some MRE heaters, a compass, some family photos, a head lamp and some paracord.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03489.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

The various ziploc baggies include Poly-pros (top and bottom), dickies cargo pants, 2 moisture wicking shirts, socks, underclothes, a balaclava, a poncho, mosquito head netting and a bandana. Also shown are 4 bottles of water, water and wind resistant gloves with wool inserts, other gloves, a winter hat, a boonie hat and my gerber multi-tool.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03490.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

Everything shown in this next photo is kept in a ziploc freezer bag so it stays dry. Here I have 3 packs of fuel gel for starting fires, toiletries, hand warmers, hair ties, insect repellent tabs, 2 bic lighters, water purification tablets, a magnesium fire starter, fish hooks, deet, a small sewing kit and some water proof matches.

<img src="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t50/ ... C03491.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

Not shown is my piece of shit mess kit because I intend on buying myself a nice snow peak titanium mess kit really soon here. Also, I don't intend on actually storing a gun in my b.o.b. but I do plan on getting some extra magazines to keep in there. Just haven't done it yet. Also, I have a hooded casualty blanket (it's like a space blanket on steroids) that somehow missed the bug out bag photo-shoot, along with a camp towel and a duct-tape reinforced ziploc baggy for storing cash. Also, sometime in the near future I plan on buying myself a nice fixed blade. Something else I haven't done yet. And, I think that's about it.


So.... let me know what you think.
Last edited by Shiner86 on Thu Aug 28, 2008 5:47 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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Post by SweetTea » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:15 am

This is all great, except for the water. You really need more than 2 liters. If you're pressed for space, it looks like you could slap a 4 or 6 liter dromedary bag on the back webbing as long as it didn't interfere with the zipper for your trauma kit (which rocks, by the way).

Another issue: there aren't any medicines. You can get immodium AD, off-brand claritin or other antihistamine, and ibuprofen in the form of midol in blister packs and keep a sheet or two of each in a ziplock. The whole shebang takes up about the same space as your write in the rain pad. With all those blood-stoppers, a wee bottle of bactine might be in order so that you can help people out after you've stopped the bleeding.

Not to be uncouth, but you may want to include some feminine products. Stress does weird things to cycles.

Also, um... shelter? I don't know the topography of fort hood, but I doubt that you can just lie down on the ground and be comfy. Even a large trash bag or poncho could team up with that paracord and make a serviceable shelter.

What type of things are you planning on using this BOB for? How much does it weigh now and what are your upper and lower limits for weight?

P.S. nice ZS emblem, how did you do it?

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Post by congochris » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:42 am

Sweet, I'm going to take a wild stab that her hubby might be carrying the heavy sh..stucc like Shelter and whatnot (I know I will be) because she probably can't carry quite as much at the moment.

I have to agree on the fem products. You'll never know when you'll have to bug out.

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Re: Shiner's B.O.B.

Post by ironraven » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:53 am

>The front pouch is reserved for trauma supplies.

No EMT Shears?

I'm hoping your more basic gauze and the like is part of the unspecified IFAK contents?

Rather than having these loose like this, I'd want to see them in either a hard case (tupperware is fine) or a couple of gallon freezer bags. Neither adds enough time to matter, but they keep things dry. Even if in theory your pack is water proof, medical items need to be kept dry.

>non-latex gloves.

Did you find the elusive albino nitrile? If so, where? Or are they vinyls? I'd go with nitriles long before vinyls, just becuase I've never seen the vinyl ones have a decent seal at the wrists.

>beef enchiladas from an MRE,

You are tough! I wouldn't eat one of these on a bet in the field. :) I'm going to assume you've tried and confirmed the stomachability of each of these items?

>a 3600 mainstay brick,

I like the 1200s for a simple reason- anything that is being protected by the packaging is no long protected if you open it. At least, I don't think you are going to be eating a whole 3600 mainstay in one go. *blinks* At the very least, a freezer bag to hold the left overs.

>basic IFAK,

Details please. I'm hoping you have basic gauze (pads and rolls), bandaids, etc, along with a minimal pharmacy in here.

>2 light sticks,

Watch the use by date- the Colemans have a crappy shelf life. And I'd probably slip something like a Garrity if not a Krill Lamp in here- you can turn them off.

>a mirror,

Maybe a smaller one?

>a compass,

Is that a cheap copy or one of the better lensatics? You can't waste money on a good compass; you can waste a lot more than money on a bad one.

>4 bottles of water,

Good to see the water, but these things aren't so robust. They look like 20 ounces? You can do better- remember, a busted water bottle is basically useless. Even if it is only four of the small Nalgenes or a pair of canteens, despite having less total water now, you're more likely to have water in the future.

>2 bic lighters,

I'm just going to make a stamp... Zip ties under the plungers, so they can't be vented accidently. No one likes an empty Bic, and even fewer people like a molotov ruck. :) The baggies are nice, but not a great way to go.

>water purification tablets,

Those look like clor-flocs (the white back in the lower left?). You can do a lot better in a much smaller package.

>a magnesium fire starter,

Practice with it. :) They aren't as fool proof as they look. I'd suggest a small piece of hacksaw to use as a striker/scraper- protects your knife.

>fish hooks,

I think I missed them. Do you have any line to go with?

>deet,

Can eat your pack. Cutter Advanced (can't remember what is in it) works at least as well, and doesn't harm nylon.

>a small sewing kit

You can do better than that. I'm not being sexist- you'd have to go out of your way to NOT do better than the hotel freebies.

>some water proof matches.

Not in the box alone! At least put them in a ziplock. They are called "waterproof" but they are really just "moisture resistant".

>hooded casualty blanket (it's like a space blanket on steroids)

Excellent item.

>a nice fixed blade.

I was going to mention that.

Can you tell us more about duration and expected plan? Not details, but just a general idea. (Bear probably told us, but the specifics start to run together if I don't have them to look at.)

Texas, so you don't need to worry about cold that much, and you've got a poncho.

What I don't see are much in the way of signals- you've got the mirror, but I didn't see a whistle. EDC?

Relatively urban area, with low water. Three things spring to mind- current sniffer, gas wrench (or use your pliers if they fit), and a four-way silcock key. No, it isn't something Bear has to hit me for suggesting- it is the dingus that lets you get water out of outside faucets without the twist part.

Safety glasses, or spares if you wear normal glasses/contacts.

Tooth brush.

Zip ties, wire- with those, a GOOD sewing kit and duct tape, you can fix most everything.

Some empty quart and gallon ziplocks, and a large garbage bag or two.

Spare batteries for your lights- are they common between them?

If you have a pistol, at least a minimal cleaning kit.

Having BOB-camped with my sister growing up, I'm going to strongly echo the need for feminine supplies.

Is the blue tarp included, or is the poncho and blanket your only shelter items?

Despite my comments and observations, a good, low profile kit. Down side is low duration. That might or might not be a problem. What I will say is don't count on Bear to be able to carry the heavy stuff. You need to be self sufficient on shelter, food, etc, on the off chance something worse happens or you have to bug out without him.

Oh, one last thing- a leash. To keep Bear from wandering off and getting in trouble. :lol:
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Post by SweetTea » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:54 am

Even so, there should be an emergency bivy or space blanket in case they get separated or TFB suddenly gets called up to deal with whatever the emergency is. I'm all for sharing the load, so to speak, but are you sure they'll be able to be right next to each other the whole time?

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Post by Woods Walker » Mon Nov 26, 2007 1:04 am

Snow peak makes some good stuff. Maybe talk that bear guy into one so I don't have to look at his cheap junk mess kit anymore. :D More water would be nice. Maybe toss in one of those canteens you got in that sale. Maybe some good tent stakes to help pitch that blue poly tarp. Most of the so-called waterproof matches suck. The MRE matches work ok. The Coleman ones is a box tend to fail in the field when needed most. Or at least they have failed me. :(

Maybe a Silva or Suunto compass would be better. Do you have a map of your State?

Overall I like your BOB.
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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:02 am

SweetTea wrote:This is all great, except for the water. You really need more than 2 liters. If you're pressed for space, it looks like you could slap a 4 or 6 liter dromedary bag on the back webbing as long as it didn't interfere with the zipper for your trauma kit (which rocks, by the way).

Another issue: there aren't any medicines. You can get immodium AD, off-brand claritin or other antihistamine, and ibuprofen in the form of midol in blister packs and keep a sheet or two of each in a ziplock.
Not to be uncouth, but you may want to include some feminine products. Stress does weird things to cycles.

Also, um... shelter? I don't know the topography of fort hood, but I doubt that you can just lie down on the ground and be comfy. Even a large trash bag or poncho could team up with that paracord and make a serviceable shelter.

What type of things are you planning on using this BOB for? How much does it weigh now and what are your upper and lower limits for weight?

P.S. nice ZS emblem, how did you do it?
I've got ammodium AD, antihistamines, ibuprofen and some other medicines in my ifak. Feminine hygiene products were actually included with toiletries.

As for shelter, if nothing else I've got paracord, a tarp and the casualty blanket. I've also got a 2 man tent and a sleeping bag that I plan on grabbing if I actually have to bug out. As of yet, I haven't figured out how to actually attach them to my bag. Not even sure that I'm going to. Also, I do carry the poncho you suggested.

The ZS emblem is actually just a business card. I need to replace it with a patch.

Just out of curiosity, how much water do you carry? I was thinking about keeping a filled nalgene bottle attached to the outside of my bag. In a pinch, I do have my water purification tabs.

This B.O.B. is honestly just intended to get me the hell out of dodge. In the future I have plans to work on an INCH bag but this isn't it.

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:07 am

congochris wrote:Sweet, I'm going to take a wild stab that her hubby might be carrying the heavy sh..stucc like Shelter and whatnot (I know I will be) because she probably can't carry quite as much at the moment.

I have to agree on the fem products. You'll never know when you'll have to bug out.
I've actually got a 2man tent that I plan on carrying but as of yet haven't been able to attach to my bag. I tried using bungee cord but everytime I go hiking it comes loose. I'll post pictures of it later. maybe you guys have some suggestions.

And the feminine products were included with toiletries. I just didn't think you guys needed a visual aid. :lol:

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:46 am

ironraven wrote:>The front pouch is reserved for trauma supplies.

No EMT Shears?

I'm hoping your more basic gauze and the like is part of the unspecified IFAK contents?

Rather than having these loose like this, I'd want to see them in either a hard case (tupperware is fine) or a couple of gallon freezer bags. Neither adds enough time to matter, but they keep things dry. Even if in theory your pack is water proof, medical items need to be kept dry.

>non-latex gloves.

Did you find the elusive albino nitrile? If so, where? Or are they vinyls? I'd go with nitriles long before vinyls, just becuase I've never seen the vinyl ones have a decent seal at the wrists.

>beef enchiladas from an MRE,

You are tough! I wouldn't eat one of these on a bet in the field. :) I'm going to assume you've tried and confirmed the stomachability of each of these items?

>a 3600 mainstay brick,

I like the 1200s for a simple reason- anything that is being protected by the packaging is no long protected if you open it. At least, I don't think you are going to be eating a whole 3600 mainstay in one go. *blinks* At the very least, a freezer bag to hold the left overs.

>basic IFAK,

Details please. I'm hoping you have basic gauze (pads and rolls), bandaids, etc, along with a minimal pharmacy in here.

>2 light sticks,

Watch the use by date- the Colemans have a crappy shelf life. And I'd probably slip something like a Garrity if not a Krill Lamp in here- you can turn them off.

>a mirror,

Maybe a smaller one?

>a compass,

Is that a cheap copy or one of the better lensatics? You can't waste money on a good compass; you can waste a lot more than money on a bad one.

>4 bottles of water,

Good to see the water, but these things aren't so robust. They look like 20 ounces? You can do better- remember, a busted water bottle is basically useless. Even if it is only four of the small Nalgenes or a pair of canteens, despite having less total water now, you're more likely to have water in the future.

>2 bic lighters,

I'm just going to make a stamp... Zip ties under the plungers, so they can't be vented accidently. No one likes an empty Bic, and even fewer people like a molotov ruck. :) The baggies are nice, but not a great way to go.

>water purification tablets,

Those look like clor-flocs (the white back in the lower left?). You can do a lot better in a much smaller package.

>a magnesium fire starter,

Practice with it. :) They aren't as fool proof as they look. I'd suggest a small piece of hacksaw to use as a striker/scraper- protects your knife.

>fish hooks,

I think I missed them. Do you have any line to go with?

>deet,

Can eat your pack. Cutter Advanced (can't remember what is in it) works at least as well, and doesn't harm nylon.

>a small sewing kit

You can do better than that. I'm not being sexist- you'd have to go out of your way to NOT do better than the hotel freebies.

>some water proof matches.

Not in the box alone! At least put them in a ziplock. They are called "waterproof" but they are really just "moisture resistant".

>hooded casualty blanket (it's like a space blanket on steroids)

Excellent item.

>a nice fixed blade.

I was going to mention that.

Can you tell us more about duration and expected plan? Not details, but just a general idea. (Bear probably told us, but the specifics start to run together if I don't have them to look at.)

Texas, so you don't need to worry about cold that much, and you've got a poncho.

What I don't see are much in the way of signals- you've got the mirror, but I didn't see a whistle. EDC?

Relatively urban area, with low water. Three things spring to mind- current sniffer, gas wrench (or use your pliers if they fit), and a four-way silcock key. No, it isn't something Bear has to hit me for suggesting- it is the dingus that lets you get water out of outside faucets without the twist part.

Safety glasses, or spares if you wear normal glasses/contacts.

Tooth brush.

Zip ties, wire- with those, a GOOD sewing kit and duct tape, you can fix most everything.

Some empty quart and gallon ziplocks, and a large garbage bag or two.

Spare batteries for your lights- are they common between them?

If you have a pistol, at least a minimal cleaning kit.

Having BOB-camped with my sister growing up, I'm going to strongly echo the need for feminine supplies.

Is the blue tarp included, or is the poncho and blanket your only shelter items?

Despite my comments and observations, a good, low profile kit. Down side is low duration. That might or might not be a problem. What I will say is don't count on Bear to be able to carry the heavy stuff. You need to be self sufficient on shelter, food, etc, on the off chance something worse happens or you have to bug out without him.

Oh, one last thing- a leash. To keep Bear from wandering off and getting in trouble. :lol:
Yes, the actual sheets of gauze are in the Ifak. I'll post it in the first aid section soon. As for EMT shears, I only have one set right now and they're in my trauma bag. I'll have to get another pair. By the way, do you think one pair is enough for a B.O.B. I forget if it was Gunny or Doc Simon who said something about them wearing out after one or two uses. I'll be sure to put everything in freezer bags, too. Thanks for the advice.

The gloves are just vinyl, by the way. I've actually never even heard of albino nitrile but I'll have to look into it now.

Yes, on the MREs. TFB occasionally brings stuff home and I *love* the mexican-themed MREs. He says I'm the only person he knows who can actually digest them.

I have the 3600 brick of mainstay simply because somebody gave it to me. I was planning on duct taping it shut but I probably could use a few extra freezer bags in my b.o.b. anyways.

I'll have to interrogate TFB about the quality of my compass. I've used it a few times and it works but that's all I could tell you about it.

I'm not ready to abandon my 20 oz water bottles but I am thinking about lashing a full nalgene bottle onto the outside of my pack.

The water resistant matches, along with everything else in that photo, is kept inside 2 ziploc freezer bags. I just took everything out for the photos.

The fish hooks and line are threaded through the napkin pack from an MRE. Didn't want to take any chances on them poking through anything.

I'll be sure to add a whistle to my pack. The travel tooth brush was actually lumped together with "toiletries", as were the feminine hygiene products.

I do have a pistol and the cleaning kit actually carries in the pistol's case but I will look into getting an extra kit for my b.o.b.

Both my lights do use the same battery set so I will have to look into getting some extra triple As. Safety glasses as well.

The blue tarp does fold up and go inside my pack.

I've never heard of a current sniffer or a silcock key. I'll add that to my ever growing list of things to look into.

Honestly, this bag is just intended to last through short term disasters. I have plans for an INCH bag in the making but this isn't it. I wouldn't necessarily call Fort Hood urban. The living quarters are residential and I'm sure there are areas that could be construed as urban but most of the base itself is actually woods, woods and more woods. My "get off post in a hurry without people seeing me" plan actually involves time in the woods.

As for TFB carrying the heavy stuff, I'm actually the one carrying our 2 man tent. He's carrying a military pup-tent in case he gets separated from me. We also each have our own sleeping bag not shown in my photos. When I figure out how to attach everything for my bag, I'll be sure to post pics.

And believe it or not, I do have a leash for TFB. Unfortunately, it's neon green so I don't think I'll necessarily be bugging out with it.

Thanks for all your help! I'll be sure to post updates soon including some of your suggestions.

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:48 am

Duplicate post.
Last edited by Shiner86 on Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:55 am

Woods Walker wrote:Snow peak makes some good stuff. Maybe talk that bear guy into one so I don't have to look at his cheap junk mess kit anymore. :D More water would be nice. Maybe toss in one of those canteens you got in that sale. Maybe some good tent stakes to help pitch that blue poly tarp. Most of the so-called waterproof matches suck. The MRE matches work ok. The Coleman ones is a box tend to fail in the field when needed most. Or at least they have failed me. :(

Maybe a Silva or Suunto compass would be better. Do you have a map of your State?

Overall I like your BOB.
I don't have a state map. Actually, I shudder even to think how big a state map of texas would have to be for me to be able to read it. I do have a map of central texas and per your suggestion I'll be adding it to my b.o.b.

And I'll see what I can do about Bear's P.O.S. mess kit :lol:

I'm actually taking advice on a new compass. I think somebody else a few posts up suggested a lensatics. How do you think that would stack up against a silva or a suunto?

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Post by Dr. Quickdraw McGraw » Mon Nov 26, 2007 10:10 am

Ditch the freebie sporks and get a "light my fire" brand spork
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Post by ironraven » Mon Nov 26, 2007 1:11 pm

>Yes, the actual sheets of gauze are in the Ifak.

Good. :) And I only have one pair of shears in my bag, so I can't fault anyone for having that many. :P I've killed them in the past, but if I have to do that much with them, in a bug out, for my purposes, I'll probably have to triage you out- leave you in your sleeping bag, with your sidearm and a water bottle, and then loot your gear. *scowls* I'm not set up to care for someone who's really messed up.

>I've actually never even heard of albino nitrile

*laughs* Neither have I- I was joking. The only nitriles I've seen are sky blue, pimp purple and neon green.

>I'll have to interrogate TFB about the quality of my compass.

My concern is that there are models which look like what you have that are dry compasses. The problem with a dry compass is that they aren't dampened so they NEVER stop swinging. Often cheaply made so there are spots where the dial drags on the spindle. And I've never seen one like this were you could adjuct the declination manually- critical if you want to be going north, your declination is LOT different from mine.

>I'm not ready to abandon my 20 oz water bottles

They ARE cute. But that is about all. I'm willing to bet if you kicked on hard enough, it would rupture. It comes under the "monkey with a locked box" style of testing, but if you fall flat on your back, you could put that much force on the bottles.

>I've never heard of a current sniffer or a silcock key.

Current sniffer is a (sub)urban item, but I'd recommend them if you are going to be where people are. They can tell you if something is hot (electrically) before you touch it- good for two things, seeing if the lights are back on (they chirp if they get near the line going into the meter) and they let you know if something that is metal is safe to touch. I've been zapped, and I'm shock shy. The technical term is "non contact current detector".

The silcock is just good- let's you get water in odd places. :P

>And believe it or not, I do have a leash for TFB. ....it's neon green

Well, if the ACU doesn't make him easy to spot, that will. :P
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Post by congochris » Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:34 pm

If you're having problems getting stuff onto/into your pack, you might consider a new one. I've got one about the same size, and it's about to be replaced with my smaller Kelty due to the fact that it's just too damned small.

I saw at sportsmans warehouse an aluminum bodied lensatic, pretty sure it was a Silva. I'll be buying one of those in a bit to replace this plastic POS I have (looks like it might be the same one you have) and I'll probably end up giving that to my daughter as a toy....

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Post by drunkensurvivor » Mon Nov 26, 2007 4:12 pm

Maybe it is not needed in Texas, but I would see about replacing the cheap poncho with some real Goretex rain gear. Your husband seems to be able to get USGI stuff pretty easily.

A swiss army knife or similar at the minimum. A knife it too important to have only the multi tool and no back up.

I don't know anything about the gel fuel, but I am guessing that petroleum soaked cotton balls would be better or more efficient.

"3 packages of rice based oral electrolyte mix"

:?

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 5:07 pm

drunkensurvivor wrote:Maybe it is not needed in Texas, but I would see about replacing the cheap poncho with some real Goretex rain gear. Your husband seems to be able to get USGI stuff pretty easily.

A swiss army knife or similar at the minimum. A knife it too important to have only the multi tool and no back up.

I don't know anything about the gel fuel, but I am guessing that petroleum soaked cotton balls would be better or more efficient.

"3 packages of rice based oral electrolyte mix"

:?
I honestly don't like gortex for my b.o.b. because if I'm not thinking of the wrong thing it's both waterproof and warm. I guess what I mean is, I would hate to have to wear it in the middle of august when it's 115 degrees outside. Although you're right, I should replace the cheap poncho with something of a higher quality.

I do have a nice swiss army knife but I didn't include it with my b.o.b. pics because it's actually my edc.

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 5:10 pm

ironraven wrote:
>I've actually never even heard of albino nitrile

*laughs* Neither have I- I was joking. The only nitriles I've seen are sky blue, pimp purple and neon green.
You can add black to your list. I don't know why, but my husband has 3 boxes of black nitrile gloves in our house and I'm replacing the nylon gloves in my b.o.b. with a few pairs of these.

Oh, and about a current sniffer. Tell me more about this chirping, please. Can I prevent it from chirping? I'd hate to be in a situation where I'm all quiet and sneaky and then have this thing give me away. It's bad enough I have to try and keep TFB quiet. :lol:

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Post by SweetTea » Mon Nov 26, 2007 6:29 pm

Shiner86 wrote:
SweetTea wrote:This is all great, except for the water. You really need more than 2 liters. If you're pressed for space, it looks like you could slap a 4 or 6 liter dromedary bag on the back webbing as long as it didn't interfere with the zipper for your trauma kit (which rocks, by the way).

Another issue: there aren't any medicines. You can get immodium AD, off-brand claritin or other antihistamine, and ibuprofen in the form of midol in blister packs and keep a sheet or two of each in a ziplock.
Not to be uncouth, but you may want to include some feminine products. Stress does weird things to cycles.

Also, um... shelter? I don't know the topography of fort hood, but I doubt that you can just lie down on the ground and be comfy. Even a large trash bag or poncho could team up with that paracord and make a serviceable shelter.

What type of things are you planning on using this BOB for? How much does it weigh now and what are your upper and lower limits for weight?

P.S. nice ZS emblem, how did you do it?
I've got ammodium AD, antihistamines, ibuprofen and some other medicines in my ifak. Feminine hygiene products were actually included with toiletries.

As for shelter, if nothing else I've got paracord, a tarp and the casualty blanket. I've also got a 2 man tent and a sleeping bag that I plan on grabbing if I actually have to bug out. As of yet, I haven't figured out how to actually attach them to my bag. Not even sure that I'm going to. Also, I do carry the poncho you suggested.

The ZS emblem is actually just a business card. I need to replace it with a patch.

Just out of curiosity, how much water do you carry? I was thinking about keeping a filled nalgene bottle attached to the outside of my bag. In a pinch, I do have my water purification tabs.

This B.O.B. is honestly just intended to get me the hell out of dodge. In the future I have plans to work on an INCH bag but this isn't it.
Glad to hear that you have some shelter, exposure sucks. As for attaching the tent and sleeping bag, it looks like your only option would be to lash it to the bottom by tying it to the 2 bottom edges of the webbing on the back and to the bottom 2 buckles on the sides. This is assuming that you don't need to open the buckles to get to everything, which it looks like you don't. Your tent and sleeping bag might be slapping you in the butt a lot, but at least it will be with you.

When you replace the ZS card with a patch, you should opt to sew it on rather than iron it on. I won't tell you why, but I think you should also know that a 20, 50, or 100 dollar bill could be folded to fit behind... say... a 3x1.5 inch peice of cloth. Just sayin.

I carry 5 liters in wide mouth nalgenes. Polycarbonate is tough as hell, and I picked wide mouth so I could throw a tea bag in one and brew while I walk. With my copious disposable income, I plan on getting 2 4-6 liter dromedary bags so lash to the sides of my pack (it gets very hot and humid in the summer). But my pack is way bigger than yours; I think you would do a big favor to yourself if you got a 6-liter dromedary or 2 3-liter camelbak bladders. They could most likely be easily lashed to the webbing on the back of your pack. When it gets 115 degrees F outside, you could lose a liter to a liter and a half every 2 hours. That means that even if you hydrate before you bug out, you have a max of 5-6 hours to get wherever you're going before you get heatstroke or heat exhaustion. A bladder or two could greatly improve your situation.

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Post by sheddi » Mon Nov 26, 2007 6:47 pm

SweetTea wrote:As for attaching the tent and sleeping bag, it looks like your only option would be to lash it to the bottom by tying it to the 2 bottom edges of the webbing on the back and to the bottom 2 buckles on the sides.
I was wondering whether the tent and bag could go vertically on the sides of the pack, between the main pack body and the side compression straps.

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:24 pm

SweetTea wrote: I carry 5 liters in wide mouth nalgenes. Polycarbonate is tough as hell, and I picked wide mouth so I could throw a tea bag in one and brew while I walk. With my copious disposable income, I plan on getting 2 4-6 liter dromedary bags so lash to the sides of my pack (it gets very hot and humid in the summer). But my pack is way bigger than yours; I think you would do a big favor to yourself if you got a 6-liter dromedary or 2 3-liter camelbak bladders. They could most likely be easily lashed to the webbing on the back of your pack. When it gets 115 degrees F outside, you could lose a liter to a liter and a half every 2 hours. That means that even if you hydrate before you bug out, you have a max of 5-6 hours to get wherever you're going before you get heatstroke or heat exhaustion. A bladder or two could greatly improve your situation.
I have a 3 liter camelbak (bladder and case) but it's not actually part of my bug out bag because it can't always be filled. If I have time to fill it up before bugging out I'll be sure to but I worry about leaving it filled up all the time. I've found that if you don't let them dry out on occasion, they get pretty rough.

Are the dromedary bags tougher than camelbak bladders? Their website says they're pretty hardcore but I don't have any experience with them. I do know that camelbak bladders not in a case are pretty weak.

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Post by JCD » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:58 pm

+1 on the silcock, -3 on the current detector. She's more likely to run into a snake then not readily identifiable current.

+1 on the cash sewn behind the ZS logo. Maybe seam seal the patch?

Water. Put the Camelback bag in empty. You have enough bottles to keep you daily hydrated. Fill the bag if you camp somewhere. Make sure you have at least 3 gallons worth of water purification tablets, maybe more (Tejas is HOT).

Don't recall if I saw sunscreen. Maybe that was in toiletries as well. Sunglasses?

It seems that your bag is based on the assumption that TFB will be at your elbow with regard to the shelter and sleeping departments. Make the rash assumption that he is not (disasters don't care if hubby is deployed). The tarp works, but you might need some poles or something (Tejas isn't known for it's bounteous forests, but that might be my NE regionalism talking) If nothing else, there are fence posts, bushes et al which would allow you to put up some kind of shelter. Not happy about your sleeping gear but you can keep adding stuff forever and military pay doesn't allow for having dozens of sleeping bags.

Maybe a coke stove and alchol?

It looks like a great kit as is. All this is qvetching.
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Post by Woods Walker » Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:11 pm

"I'm actually taking advice on a new compass. I think somebody else a few posts up suggested a lensatics. How do you think that would stack up against a silva or a suunto?"

Most people don't know how to use all the features of a compass. My advice is to get a Suunto M2. As you can see it works just fine.

http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_deta ... =quigo_plp

Image

I also have a small Silva in the daypack. Unless I am wrong the compass you have is a Coleman Lensatic compass. Not to ruffle anyone feathers but if someone is telling you to get a lensatic compass and you already have one pictured it might be a good indication that they don't have experience with one or just didn't look over your BOB. Unless you are talking about ironraven who is saying to get a compass of higher quality. In either case my advice is to get a book on compass navigation. I am certain bear learned a thing or too about the topic but you don't seem like the type of person who wants to be dependant on the knowledge of others.

I would not trust my life to a cheap compass. Maybe it will work or maybe like some I have used it will fail. By cheap I am not talking about price. A compass should be well made and able to be dropped on rocks etc. Most Silva and Suunto are well made and reasonably priced.

edit. I can't spell. :(
Last edited by Woods Walker on Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by Obiwan » Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:14 pm

If water is available in your area then having a container and purification tabs is plenty (might throw in a coffeee filter or two for floaties :wink:

The dromedaries are tough...but heavy and $$ for what they are

I use these

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Post by Shiner86 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:23 pm

JCD wrote: Water. Put the Camelback bag in empty. You have enough bottles to keep you daily hydrated. Fill the bag if you camp somewhere. Make sure you have at least 3 gallons worth of water purification tablets, maybe more (Tejas is HOT).

Don't recall if I saw sunscreen. Maybe that was in toiletries as well. Sunglasses?

It seems that your bag is based on the assumption that TFB will be at your elbow with regard to the shelter and sleeping departments. Make the rash assumption that he is not (disasters don't care if hubby is deployed). The tarp works, but you might need some poles or something (Tejas isn't known for it's bounteous forests, but that might be my NE regionalism talking) If nothing else, there are fence posts, bushes et al which would allow you to put up some kind of shelter. Not happy about your sleeping gear but you can keep adding stuff forever and military pay doesn't allow for having dozens of sleeping bags.

Maybe a coke stove and alchol?

It looks like a great kit as is. All this is qvetching.
I've got sunscreen wipes in my ifak but honestly it's not one of my big concerns. With the clothes and boonie hat I have I don't imagine the sun will be too much of a problem and I'm dark enough complected that I've never burned anyways.

I've heard that central texas is more wooded than other areas of the state. In fact, the vast majority of Fort Hood is actually trees.

I do have a sleeping bag and 2man tent that are not in the photos. A few posts up, I was taking suggestions about how to attach them to my bag. I think I've got it figured out now.

I've made the decision not to carry a stove because I think I have enough food to drag out over 3 days. Beyond that, I have several ways of starting a fire (fuel gel works even when it's damp out) and (will soon have) a pretty nice mess kit. I'm actually more concerned about adding more water to my b.o.b. than ways to cook food.

Thanks for your advice!

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