My GHB - Light and Tight

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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00dlez
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My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by 00dlez » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:14 pm

In making a GHB, I wanted something that was small and focused on the basics. I'm usually never more than 10 miles or so from my house, so Plan A is to keep moving home - no stops for food, sheltering overnight, etc... Technically Plan B I guess... Plan A would be to drive home. Route A and B are both between 9 and 10 miles on foot. Route C follows a rail line about a half-mile from my office and takes me to within a quarter-mile of my house, and is around 11.5 miles.

The bag is about the size of a medium-large fanny pack, but also has a collapsible backpack tied to the outside that I can also fit the kit in, or take more stuff out of my car/office/etc to take with me or give to someone else.

I'd love to get some feedback on what I've selected and how you might do things differently.

Some notes up front since I'm sure they will come up:
- In my trunk, I have some solid boots, socks, and "alaskan crab fisherman rain gear". I usually dress in office clothes, but sometimes need to go out into the elements, so that gear is on hand and not pictured as part of the kit.

- I intend on swapping the existing fixed blade knife for a more compact folder once I find one I like.

- I EDC a Leatherman Style CS and a Thrunite LED Flashlight on my keys; not pictured but more things I have (though redundant)

- I plan to include 2 or 3 contractor 55 gallon bags as well

Image

Contents (roughly counter clockwise):
50 ft. orange duct tape
100 ft. 550 cord
Headlamp (3xAAA batteries)
Rain poncho
Leatherman Wave
4 x Clif Bars
Work gloves
Bandana
3" Fixed blade knife

Waterproof Pouch with:
-Maps of metro area
-Compass
-Ink Pen
-Marker
-Pad of Paper

2 person survival blanket
Battery power pack/re-charger - has 4xAAA batteries inside (this thing: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=120169)
Lifestraw
Sunscreen
Hand Sanitzer
First Aid Kit (details/contents here: viewtopic.php?f=43&t=120228)
Hand crank radio/flashlight
4 x N95 Masks
Small Bic Lighter
Tea candle
Waterproof match-case with whistle, button compass, and signal mirror
1 quart canteen with stainless steel nested cup

Image
All packed up!

Image
Packed into the collapsible backpack


I'd appreciate some feedback and happy to answer any questions you might have
Batman has a pretty good EDC. - Purple_Mutant

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majorhavoc
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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by majorhavoc » Wed Jun 14, 2017 9:13 am

Seems very well thought out to me, given your proximity to home. I like how your gear selection for the kit itself is iterative, complimenting what you typically EDC and have in your car trunk. So I agree with your determination that just one additional light source and minimal food/shelter is sufficient. And I like how you've anticipated the potential need for extra carrying capacity by including a collapsible backpack. I too work in an office and should an emergency arise that requires a long walk home, I'd certainly grab as many snacks, water bottles, spare clothing as I could lay my hands on.

My initial comments:

+1 on the contractors bags; get those into your kit as soon as possible.

You didn't mention that you actually have matches in your waterproof match case. Do you? Just making sure you have a backup to your Bic Mini. Two is one and one is none, yadda yadda yadda.

I'd stick a pair of heavy wool socks in one of those boots that you keep in your trunk. And depending on your location/time of the year, a small fleece watch cap and lightweight gloves in the other. A fleece vest might be something else to consider having in your trunk.

Maybe a back up means to carry another pint or two of water. One of those roll up BPA-free water bottles perhaps.

Water. Consider keeping a gallon of water in your car trunk. It's handy for hydration obviously, but also for other potential issues, such as auto cooling system problems, dealing with wounds/chemical exposure or even putting out a small fire.

Don't assume even your 11.5 mile route C will be the longest distance you'll have to cover. Depending on the nature of the emergency, you may have do some considerable detouring. And I would at least consider the possibility that you might be forced to shelter somewhere overnight. If for no reason other than an emergency might not occur until the very end of the work day, and at a time of year when it gets dark early.

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by 00dlez » Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:06 pm

majorhavoc wrote:Seems very well thought out to me, given your proximity to home. I like how your gear selection for the kit itself is iterative, complimenting what you typically EDC and have in your car trunk. So I agree with your determination that just one additional light source and minimal food/shelter is sufficient. And I like how you've anticipated the potential need for extra carrying capacity by including a collapsible backpack. I too work in an office and should an emergency arise that requires a long walk home, I'd certainly grab as many snacks, water bottles, spare clothing as I could lay my hands on.

My initial comments:

+1 on the contractors bags; get those into your kit as soon as possible.

You didn't mention that you actually have matches in your waterproof match case. Do you? Just making sure you have a backup to your Bic Mini. Two is one and one is none, yadda yadda yadda.

I'd stick a pair of heavy wool socks in one of those boots that you keep in your trunk. And depending on your location/time of the year, a small fleece watch cap and lightweight gloves in the other. A fleece vest might be something else to consider having in your trunk.

Maybe a back up means to carry another pint or two of water. One of those roll up BPA-free water bottles perhaps.

Water. Consider keeping a gallon of water in your car trunk. It's handy for hydration obviously, but also for other potential issues, such as auto cooling system problems, dealing with wounds/chemical exposure or even putting out a small fire.

Don't assume even your 11.5 mile route C will be the longest distance you'll have to cover. Depending on the nature of the emergency, you may have do some considerable detouring. And I would at least consider the possibility that you might be forced to shelter somewhere overnight. If for no reason other than an emergency might not occur until the very end of the work day, and at a time of year when it gets dark early.
Thanks for the feedback!

Yes - there are 15-20 waterproof matches in there. I may actually switch that container out for a different one I have, though. The other container doesn't have the compass/whistle/mirror that I like (and need some form of in the kit), but it is wider and the container portion is slightly larger. I think I could fit 5+ legit stormproof matches and a tab of wetfire in it. Especially given my scope and travel distance, I don't think I really need that many matches.

What do you mean by "heavy wool socks", specifically? I guess I didn't really clarify, the socks I keep in the trunk are some run of the mill, but quality, wool hiking socks. Are you suggesting more than that or more or less what you had in mind?

I didn't want to include what's in my car/office/etc in the post to focus more on the kit itself, but I do have between a dozen to two dozen water bottles in my car (office has probably 100 or so on hand at any time, and there's two of us here... not to mention about 30-40 gallons in 5 gallon water cooler jugs). Perhaps when I have some time I'll get a post up of all the miscellaneous gear I generally have around me during the day to reference in these types of posts.

I have some collapsible water containers, but didn't include it since I really am low on space. My thought on it (and please let me know if you agree or disagree) was similar to why I didn't include any water purification tablets. I have the life straw to drink when an opportunity arises, and can even stop for 15-20 minutes to drink my fill and move on. Taking the time to purify and effort to sherpa another 2-3 pounds of water... meh?
Batman has a pretty good EDC. - Purple_Mutant

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by Asymetryczna » Wed Jun 14, 2017 1:09 pm

Your stomach is the water carrier you most depend on...hydrate means drink the stuff. Top off the containers you want to carry with you but mainly, top off yourself before you get started. If you carry as much water as you can inside of you the amount of time you spend finding more is mitigated for a while. It should be said that there are so many nifty exterior carriers now, I would add.

I don't know what area you live in but I like to have a something small with me that increases my ability to see at least 3x so that I cut down on surprises up ahead, mistaking a fly-fishing case for a LAAW rocket, for example.
It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.
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majorhavoc
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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by majorhavoc » Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:25 pm

00dlez wrote:
majorhavoc wrote:I'd stick a pair of heavy wool socks ...
What do you mean by "heavy wool socks", specifically? I guess I didn't really clarify, the socks I keep in the trunk are some run of the mill, but quality, wool hiking socks. Are you suggesting more than that or more or less what you had in mind?
No, that's just me not reading your original post carefully. I'm sure whatever you have is fine.

00dlez wrote:Yes - there are 15-20 waterproof matches in there.
I thought as much, but I had to ask.

00dlez wrote: I didn't want to include what's in my car/office/etc in the post to focus more on the kit itself, but I do have between a dozen to two dozen water bottles in my car (office has probably 100 or so on hand at any time.

Speaks to the wisdom of your inclusion of that collapsible backpack so that stuff is available to you. I generally refrain from referencing my zombie story in real world posts, but there's a section early in the story where the main character is surprised to discover just how many useful supplies (and a bit of illicit contraband) can be found in a large office building. That story element is a reflection of my own real life office working environment. Of course, outside of the fiction section I'm talking only about those things one has a legal right to take and use.
00dlez wrote: I have some collapsible water containers, but didn't include it since I really am low on space. My thought on it (and please let me know if you agree or disagree) was similar to why I didn't include any water purification tablets. I have the life straw to drink when an opportunity arises, and can even stop for 15-20 minutes to drink my fill and move on. Taking the time to purify and effort to sherpa another 2-3 pounds of water... meh?
Well, I think your real answer is those 12 - 24 water bottles in your car; take as much as you can comfortably carry. As far as the Lifestraw goes, I have one in my GHB too, so I can't very well fault you for packing that. But I myself am skeptical how much use it'll get in a real world situation. If it's a particularly wet time of the year, maybe. But I also wonder if the circumstances of the emergency might make those 15-20 minute stops problematic.
Asymetryczna wrote:Your stomach is the water carrier you most depend on...hydrate means drink the stuff. Top off the containers you want to carry with you but mainly, top off yourself before you get started.
Very good point. Our old adage in East Africa was to drink and drink and drink until your piss is gin clear before heading off into the bush.

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by 00dlez » Wed Jun 14, 2017 4:52 pm

majorhavoc wrote:As far as the Lifestraw goes, I have one in my GHB too, so I can't very well fault you for packing that. But I myself am skeptical how much use it'll get in a real world situation. If it's a particularly wet time of the year, maybe. But I also wonder if the circumstances of the emergency might make those 15-20 minute stops problematic.
My routes home actually cross 3 or 4 drinkable bodies of water (public water sources - creeks, "rivers", and ponds/lakes in public parks) where I would be comfortable using the lifestraw (though I've never actually used one before). I too would be nervous about drinking down a street puddle, lifestraw or not.
majorhavoc wrote:
Asymetryczna wrote:Your stomach is the water carrier you most depend on...hydrate means drink the stuff. Top off the containers you want to carry with you but mainly, top off yourself before you get started.
Very good point. Our old adage in East Africa was to drink and drink and drink until your piss is gin clear before heading off into the bush.
And again, I realize I didn't really discuss it in the OP, but if it seemed dire enough, I could easily eat 1,000-1,500 calorie meal and drink a half gallon of water before starting out for home, let alone tapping into what's in the bag.
Batman has a pretty good EDC. - Purple_Mutant

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by drop bear » Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:31 pm

If I planned on not stopping. My whole kit would be centered around apparel. Because that is the bulk of what would be protecting me.

I tend not to edc a decent jacket or pants if it is warm during the day. So for me it has to be part of my GHB. Sunglasses insect repellant. All the sorts of things that would grind after 12 hours of walking.

Otherwise I like a better torch for night walking. And so would go a good torch and a little battery am fm radio. The crank sets up for when you are out so long your batteries run dry. Which is pretty long to be honest.

Same with the matches. Add a fire starter. It will only get you through 1 fire but we are still working on short times here.

House key is good so you dont have to kick the door in when you get home. Money is super usefull. I like high vis stuff. So I dont get run over on the side of the road.

I dont really know what you use 2 knives for. I have a multi tool and an eating knife. I havent really needed another knife. But you might have a different curcumstance. For the eating knife I carry the victorianox sentinel. Because the steel is very rust proof. And the design is very smooth. So if I get food or gunk in the knife it washes out easily. And I can close it up wet and put it away. So you could swap out the fixed blade for that.

I stumbled upon some cheap waterproof pens and notebooks recently. And they are ging in kits everywhere.
Uniball tank.
https://youtu.be/m_R1yNIK1tQ

Tradie (nustone) notebook.
https://youtu.be/YKmo83tk-kA

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by 00dlez » Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:03 pm

drop bear wrote: and a little battery am fm radio. The crank sets up for when you are out so long your batteries run dry. Which is pretty long to be honest.
The radio actually can be charged via the crank OR a micro USB cable, so I can attach the Watson battery pack I have in the kit to use it on battery power

Also, I just weighed the pack and was a little disappointed. It was 6.6 lbs without the water full - so +2 lbs for water. Not sure what I was expecting though. Thoughts?
Batman has a pretty good EDC. - Purple_Mutant

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by drop bear » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:04 am

00dlez wrote:
drop bear wrote: and a little battery am fm radio. The crank sets up for when you are out so long your batteries run dry. Which is pretty long to be honest.
The radio actually can be charged via the crank OR a micro USB cable, so I can attach the Watson battery pack I have in the kit to use it on battery power

Also, I just weighed the pack and was a little disappointed. It was 6.6 lbs without the water full - so +2 lbs for water. Not sure what I was expecting though. Thoughts?
You could get rid of a lot of gear if you wanted. Water will always weigh what it weighs. I mean poncho. string,water, torch, money. That should give you a couple of days bare bones.

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by acropolis5 » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:35 pm

OOdlez: Well done on a good start & proposed amendments, especially money ($200 minimum, small bills, up to $20 bill, no big demominations), a poncho/ rain suit, 2 Bic lighters, etc.

. It is not clear to me whether you're in an urban, suburban or rural environment and what is the predominate climate. Although, I did catch the " Alaska" reference. Also terrain must be considered, along with you age, health, level of fitness. So with those unknowns in mind, I offer the following suggestions:

Add a Streamlight 2AA Pro-Tac light ( or equivalent) & lithium batteries;

Add a small Sony earbud am-fm radio ( or equivalent) & lithium batteries;

Add a REAL first-aid-kit with real trauma supplies, e.g. TK-4 tourniquet, "izzy" type bandages, chest seal, Celox Combat Gauze; 28 French Nasal airway; Sterile triangular bandage, chest seals, etc. google Adventure Medical orChinook Products to see kits/ supplies. Get training or at least watch the available internet videos on use of trauma supplies;

Add "Bear Spray" in a belt holster. It's also effective against both 2 footed & 4 footed "dogs";

Add a strong 3'-5' strong hardwood hiking staff or crook neck walking stick with a combo hard/ soft ferrule at the tip. It is a good walking aid, invaluable in slippery conditions and even "dogs" don't usually bother a man with a big stick in his hand;

And finally, buy two books to study/ carry, Wilderness Medicine by Fogery and the mini size SAS Survival Handbook. Definitely carry the SAS book, just-in-case.

Hope this all helps and is self-explanatory. Happy prepping.

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Re: My GHB - Light and Tight

Post by 00dlez » Mon Jun 26, 2017 12:09 pm

Thanks for the input acropolis5

I live in an urban environment - St. Louis, MO area. The "alaska gear" was bought up there when I was doing some trail building after college. The supply store we were at had 3 colors of tops/bottoms - OD, Orange, and Neon Yellow. Our 8 person crew each bought a different color combination so we could tell who was who from a distance - I was orange top, OD bottom :) . They are rubber and bulky, but are handy when I'm at work and need to go out in heavy rain/snow and only have my office clothes on.

Bear spray is pretty big and bulky... Not sure a canister of it would be needed for my purposes, but some form of pepper spray is probably a good idea... Does anyone know if a personal pepper spray would be any good on animals, like a dog? Or do you need higher strength?

I'm not a hiking junkie, but I do it often enough... I just don't like walking with a stick - just isn't comfortable for me.

I have the SAS book in a pocket size, but I don't think its really needed in this type of short term kit.

Trauma kit is a work in progress, but is coming soon - I think im going to use this water bottle carrier: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I1 ... 0DER&psc=1
Throw a first aid patch on the front, and should have enough room for a bare bones kit inside.
Batman has a pretty good EDC. - Purple_Mutant

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