Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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0122358
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Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by 0122358 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:09 am

So I'm in the market for a new INCH style bag. I've had a Kelty Falcon 66 for a year or so now and I'm just not into it. It just feels cheap, not big enough, unwieldy with pouches attached and I hate the color. My all time goal has to been a kifaru but they have been slashing designs so nothing interests me in their line up anymore.

So that brings me to the higher end tactical line up such as Mystery Ranch and Elberlestock.

I really want to the love the V60 Destroyer and the V90 Battleship packs from elberlestock but I've read that they arent american made and are imported so that worries me. I havent seen many negative reviews, but no real positive ones.

I dont want to pay 450-600 bucks for a pack to have the seams bust out or zippers fail in a couple of years. I'm not especially rough on packs but I don't want to take chances 60 miles in the back country like I've been before.

Any first hand/second hand intel on this brand and their longevity and their comfort would be great.
SMoAF wrote:Your sin is one of geography, not one of unmanliness. Pimp's sin is that he's, well....himself.
Doctorr Fabulous wrote: I'd rather have 10 spooky-sized aircraft in an AO than 100 drones, because fuck those fucking pred flyboys who can't tell the difference between a shovel and an RPK.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by Dragon80 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 2:39 pm

Short answer. No. I've owned 3. Go with a Kifaru, you won't regret it. Register on Rokslide and the Kifaru forums and find what you're looking for design and size wise in a Duplex Frame and you will never look back. The Eberlestock's biggest problems I found, was lackluster, uncomfortable, and very disappointing frame/suspension design. The packs themselves are nice, even though the 1000d is too heavy, and really worked well in functionality. Kifaru has moved to more simple, lightweight, modular designs that fit my needs just as well for less weight penalty. On the frame, I've used most of the big name backpacking brands, I've owned Mystery Ranch, Kifaru, and Eberlestock and there's just no comparison. I thought my MR 3DAP was the most comfortable pack I'd worn until I got a Kifaru pack on my back, now I only own Kifaru packs. Buy once, you won't cry once you wear it!

This message is not paid for by Aron Snyder or Kifaru, but I wouldn't mind if they did. Total fanboy, no shame.
BOB also used for backpacking
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=114606

GHB dedicated thread in need of serious updating!!!
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=112108

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by RonnyRonin » Thu Feb 02, 2017 12:21 am

Eberlestocks are quite simply some of the worst designed packs on the market. I certainly won't say they are the worst made, and are probably higher "quality" then most, but are so horrible it matters not.

They are heavy for the most absurd reasons, are too short to transfer any real weight to the belt (except for a few exceptions) and take "feature creep" to mind boggling extremes. They are little better then a running joke in the world of pack design. Their main feature (the scabbard) is about the least efficient way to carry a rifle ever devised. It not only adds dozens of layers of redundant, unneeded fabric (and the additional pounds that brings) but also moves the entire load several inches away from your back, increasing the leverage it has and multiplying the force it exerts on you. A bad thing on any pack, merely amplified by the terrible eberlestoc suspension.

Mystery Ranch, Kifaru, Stone Glacier, EXO, and Seek Outside are high end domestically made load haulers.

Eberlestock should really be lumped in with Badlands and Tenzing as mid-range (being kind) imported packs, and only midrange by virtue of not being walmart-level stuff.

Buy a used high end pack, will likely be cheaper then a new mid-range pack and you might not hate every moment it is on your back.


If you tell me the pack design and lay out you are looking for I can probably point you in the right direction, I keep up on most of the market and am pretty deep into the used pack game. With the new Kifarus and MR packs that just came out now is a decent time to pick up last years model. Also the newer imported MRs are a good bit cheaper and still very well designed, if slightly cheaper on construction.
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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by ROCK6 » Thu Feb 02, 2017 6:40 am

A lot of Eberlestock bashing! I've been using Kifaru, Arc'teryx, Mystery Ranch and yes, Eberlestock for quite some time and all but the Arc'teryx took a trip to the desert at least once.

There is some distinction with Eberlestock. Their larger packs with built in scabbards are not very stable with heavy loads. Their smaller Gungslinger is okay, but there are some design issues when it comes to balance and it does affect their suspension to a degrees.

Now, Ebelestock's Destroyer and Battlship packs are more conventional (i.e. no scabbard between the pack and frame). These are actually decently built packs. They have a lot of organization built in which adds to the pack weight if that's your thing, but construction-wise, they are pretty solid for an imported pack. The question is: does the features, construction and comfort match the price? This is debatable and I wouldn't mind buying either of these, but I would likely do it on the secondary market.

There's really not much comparison with Kifaru or Mystery Ranch in design, but the prices are also almost double. Outside of lighter fabrics, all the packs weigh a lot, but that's by design and to hold up under non-conventional use. I really doubt any civilian use of these products will wear them out. I've seen Mystery Ranch packs get abused and hold up well. It's not abuse of the packs by the individual, but when you add in all the other handling, you'll find most packs just blow out...I'm talking, being tossed 10 feet to the tarmac, ratcheted down, stepped on, sat on, pulled, stuffed, punched, etc. Most people will never expose their packs to that kind of abuse; heck, most "bugout bags" rarely even see dirt time and probably zero to minimal trail time.

To be honest, for normal to SHTF use, those two conventional Eberlestock packs will do fine. I think what is important is to first figure out what you think you need along with your plan. I would never backpack with any of my combat packs, although I would be comfortable with using Kifaru, Mystery Ranch and the Arc'teryx if I had to. They are heavy packs designed for heavy loads for extreme conditions. I've moved to semi-ultralight distance backpacking and I've been using a ULA Circuit (which comes in Multicam!) for the past few years and hundred of trail miles...it's held up extremely well for a 2-pound pack. If you want to get a large bugout bag/pack to use once in a while, the Eberlstock is not a bad choice and despite the elitists, it will hold up find and is moderately comfortable with decent suspension. If you plan to actually use that pack often and seriously take it out on multiple trips and backpacking or training, I would consider the higher end Kifaru and Mystery Ranch. Their advantage is more on comfort which is where they excel as opposed to other combat-oriented packs. What is a travesty is when the guy with money buys that Kifaru setup, loads it up with high-speed gear and tosses it in the closet for when the SHTF but never uses it outside of taking pictures to post on forums.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by Tully305 » Mon Feb 06, 2017 7:51 pm

You can't go wrong with Hill People Gear


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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by Gunner22 » Mon Feb 13, 2017 2:06 am

I bought an Eberlestock Terminator last year because I got a great deal on it. As far as construction, I couldn't ask for a better pack. Its been loaded to the seams most of the time I've owned it, had it out a few times on multi-day trips, and I don't think anything would destroy this pack other than some animal wanting something inside.

With that said, I wish I would have bought a Kifaru, and will be in the market for one soon. The weight of this thing is ridiculous for carry, and will take up a considerable amount if you are trying to stay within a set weight limit.

I wouldn't classify the suspension system as horrible, but the waist belt leaves much to be desired. It is uncomfortable at best. And the molle it does have is placed so far back, its hard to reach things you would want to place in a convenient location such as a canteen. It also took me quite a bit of time to adjust the suspension system to where it didn't feel like I had to lean forward without just cinching the load levelers all the way.

In conclusion, even though it sounds so I'm not unhappy with my purchase and will continue to use the bag. There are many bags that are much worse than Eberlestock, but there are also so many better options on the market.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by bc99 » Mon Feb 13, 2017 4:40 am

Tully305 wrote:You can't go wrong with Hill People Gear


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I'd second that. Simple designs, great harness system. Take a look.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by 0122358 » Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:04 am

Thanks guys, But after looking around I think i might save my pennys for a Mystery Ranch 6500. Its got generally the molle availability i want and other features im looking for. Its bigger than I want but thats not a bad thing as even my biggest pack right now I over fill for long trips
SMoAF wrote:Your sin is one of geography, not one of unmanliness. Pimp's sin is that he's, well....himself.
Doctorr Fabulous wrote: I'd rather have 10 spooky-sized aircraft in an AO than 100 drones, because fuck those fucking pred flyboys who can't tell the difference between a shovel and an RPK.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by RonnyRonin » Mon Feb 13, 2017 2:02 pm

0122358 wrote:Thanks guys, But after looking around I think i might save my pennys for a Mystery Ranch 6500. Its got generally the molle availability i want and other features im looking for. Its bigger than I want but thats not a bad thing as even my biggest pack right now I over fill for long trips
Those do come through ebay periodically, just keep a sharp eye out. I'd recommend the tactiplane version (no NICE frame) as it is a bit lighter but they are quite a bit rarer. The hunting and civilian versions (Terraplane and marshall) are both lighter and cheaper but don't have the MOLLE if that is your jam.
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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by ROCK6 » Wed Feb 15, 2017 8:48 am

0122358 wrote:Thanks guys, But after looking around I think i might save my pennys for a Mystery Ranch 6500. Its got generally the molle availability i want and other features im looking for. Its bigger than I want but thats not a bad thing as even my biggest pack right now I over fill for long trips
The MR 6500 is a solid pack. It won't compress for smaller loads, but this is also why we have different-sized packs. The pack is heavy, but their design is robust and really carries heavy loads well. MR's NICE frame is an exceptional design. I don't like the bulky padding on the waist belt, but that is about my only complaint.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by badasp118 » Sat Feb 18, 2017 1:50 pm

I cant comment in all of the Eberlestock packs, but to bash them is rediculus. Whats works for you, wont work for someone else. Ive carried my Eberlestock Halftrack through some of the worst conditions you can throw at it and it still looks new. Yes, Id love a Kifaru, but my Halftrack just Works! Now granted I dont have a fancy gun carrier on my model, but heavy loads are comfortable with this pack.

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Re: Elberlestock packs, Are They Worth It?

Post by moab » Sun Feb 19, 2017 11:29 am

Lets step back a second. Have you listed everything you want to take with weights? Have you added it up and figured out what size pack you need? Have you figured out how much weight you want to spend on a pack?

Now here's the kicker. All of those packs you mention are military grade and come in at 10lbs plus. You can find 80L capacity packs in commercial and the Arcteryx Khyber 80L that will hold the same loads in the 5lbs range. Yes they are probably 500d instead of 1000d. But they will get the job done. And your not running from firefight to firefight throwing your pack off an 8 foot drop from a truck - five times a day. ;)

I've built an INCH and spent a great deal of time and money rebuilding and rebuilding it. An INCH is as much about being ultralight or lightweight as it is about being rugged. As there are simply so many items to take with you. The question you have to ask is - is that 5lbs better spent on ammo? Or water? Or traps or snares? Or..?..the list goes on. Or is that 5lbs of extra pack worth it?

When you get your list fine tuned your going to be debating ounces of one thing over ounces of another to make your desired weight.

I considered military weight packs. In fact, my first one was a 10lb military pack. And I quickly realized I did want a tough pack. But I didn't need an extra 5lbs of fabric and buckles and do dads to make that work.

I now own the Khyber 80L. And couldn't be happier. It was designed in cooperation with special forces. I tend to believe they wrote the book on long rucks. And if there's one thing you learn quickly in the military it's that everything is overbuilt for the lowest common denominator. Meaning the grunt who does not care for his gear much and abuses the hell out of it.

So I'm not surprised special forces chose a 500d 80L pack in the 5lb range for their long range patrols. They know how much gear they have to take. And where weight is best distributed. An extra 5lbs of pack would be very useful to a line company grunt hauling a mortor plate and an M4. Having been in a Marine Corps Sniper unit myself. I know the value of a good pack. But one that does not break the bank weight-wise. As every ounce counts in a long range patrol pack. And a long range patrol pack is pretty much an INCH bag.

So an 80L pack in the 5lb range is not only what you need in an INCH. It's what you want. IMHO. 5lbs is a lot of fishing gear, a lot of first aid, a lot of comms, a lot of food and water and ammo. Add your items and weights up. And see what you really want to take first before you make a decision on what pack to buy. Not only for how much shear volume you need. But also what other items you might consider for that extra 5lbs.

I am a self confessed proponent of the Arcteryx Khyber 80L. I wrote a huge thread about it here:

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=110761&hilit=khyber+80l

Its got just what I need without overkill. The 500d fabric is plenty tough. The straps are made out of billboard material. Which is really tough lightweight stuff. They come in muted earth tones and multicam. And are selling for $200 at LAPG. Down from $800(?) a year ago. I don't think you can beat an Arcteryx, special forces designed, 5lb, 80L pack, for 200 bucks. For 200 you could try it out and probably sell it at a profit if it didn't work out.

Either way do yourself a favor and add up your weights. You'll be taking a good long hard look at what you want to take. And every ounce is going to be debated. Trust me. But no matter which pack you pick. All of the manufacturers you list are great brands and you can't go wrong. Just consider every ounce you want to take before hand.
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