Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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echo83
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Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by echo83 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 6:13 pm

Hello all,

This is my first post with photos, so I'm hoping it works. (If there's an easier way to post photos, please let me know.)

My work requires me to drive all day in a mixture of rural and city areas that are a minimum of a half mile, maximum of 20 miles from my home. I have emergency roadside assistance, GPS, all that good stuff in my vehicle. In an emergency, I'm supposed to stay with my vehicle and wait for assistance. (It's a company car.)

If I had to hoof it, here's what I'd be carrying:

http://imgur.com/a/bC4jf

FOOD
1x Mountain House Chili Mac with Beef
1x Mountain House Mexican Style Beef
2x Ramen
1x SOS or Datrex Lifeboat Rations
5x Honey packets
2x MRE accessory packets (coffee, matches, gum, seasoning)
2x Spoon

WATER
2x Nalgene 48 ounces
1x Aquamira Water Filter
2x Beverage Base Powder

SHELTER
3x Contractor Bags
1x HeatSheets Emergency Bivy
1x Goretex Pants
1x Goretex Jacket

FIRE
1x Magnesium bar
1x Bic lighter
2x Disposable canteen stove with 3x apiece alcohol gel
2x Sterno cans
1x Swiss Volcano Stove (1 stove, 1 corked bottle, 1 cup)

FIRST AID
1x AMK Ultralight 1-4 person, 1-4 day kit http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/med ... ght-9.html
1x Israeli Bandage
2x toilet paper
1x Spare contacts
1x phone charger

ACCESSORIES/SIGNAL
1x TacTikka+ headlamp
1x Mirror
1x 100’ 550 cord
1x strobe-style firework
1x strobe LED
1x towel
1x Gorilla Tape
1x Gerber Big Rock

And here's what I'd be carrying it in:

http://imgur.com/a/l9M45

I seek the mercy and hive-mind expertise of Zombie Squad! Please let me know what you think.

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Stercutus
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Stercutus » Sat Jul 30, 2016 6:23 pm

Chile Mac and Mexican style beef? Are you going with friends or enemies?

20 miles? I'd definitely want more water if you are anywhere in the heat. Since I don't see any cold weather gear I assume it is so.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by echo83 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 6:36 pm

My only "weapons" are my EDC Gerber multi-tool, the e-tool in my vehicle, and the Gerber Big Rock, so if there are any enemies I need all the help I can get from my Mountain House!

Good call on the water; I always have more in my vehicle. In a pinch, I can boil and purify with the volcano stove. I chose it because it runs on anything, and I don't like the idea of having to supply something like an MSR with pressurized fuel.

I'm in Massachusetts, where the weather changes every five minutes.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Stercutus » Sat Jul 30, 2016 6:41 pm

You are going to want at least one good piece of cold weather gear for the summer and something significant for the winter. In the summer time you can become hyperthermic at night. Especially if the day is hot, you have been hiking all day and then you get stuck outside overnight.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by echo83 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 7:28 pm

Agreed. Getting caught out in the cold would be brutal. Ideally, I would stay with my car if the weather was that bad. The bivy bag, as well as the contractor bags, are shelter items that I hope I never have to use on their own. Inside a vehicle, I'm sure the bivy bag would be sufficient, but really uncomfortable.

I tend to dress appropriately for the weather, but it's always a good idea to have some items in reserve.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by ManInBlack316 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 8:36 pm

Since I see MRE accessory packets, do you have the complete MREs?
For a GHB, I'd lose the meals that require you to start a fire and heat water and go with a flameless heater meal, also works good in case you're stuck waiting somewhere where starting a fire is frowned upon. Ditch the lifeboat rations for some cliff bars or other thing that's actually kind of tasty and easy to eat.
Why the sterno can AND a stove?
Other people will disagree with me but with everything going on nowadays, consider adding a chest seal and a tourniquet to the first aid, consider getting training on how to use them.
Is that a single strap pack or two strap?
Does the big pouch on one side of the pack make the pack feel uneven after a couple of miles?
I'd stick the spoon inside the pack somewhere, keep it in the original plastic so it's decently clean when you eat.
Considered a water bladder? That's my preferred method for carrying water if I'm walking, easier than having to open a pack every time you're thirsty.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by echo83 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 8:56 pm

Since I see MRE accessory packets, do you have the complete MREs?
I don't. I'm one of the few that enjoys MRE's (probably because I was never forced to eat them) but I worry that keeping them in a vehicle where the temperature fluctuates will kill the shelf life.

For a GHB, I'd lose the meals that require you to start a fire and heat water and go with a flameless heater meal, also works good in case you're stuck waiting somewhere where starting a fire is frowned upon. Ditch the lifeboat rations for some cliff bars or other thing that's actually kind of tasty and easy to eat. I like this idea, and I've had a lot of success with MRE flameless heaters. I'm a big fan of Clif Bars and Power Bars, and while I can heat the water using Sterno pretty quickly, I can definitely see the appeal of not relying on fire. The lifeboat rations are heavy (and untested...I've had MainStay, but haven't tried the Datrex or SOS. I read a great review about them on here, though, and that's why I bought them) but they pack a ton of calories into a small package. What sort of food are you packing in your bag?

Why the sterno can AND a stove?
Those little cans of Sterno are awesome, since they slide right into the base of the stove. I like Sterno since they are stable, heat evenly, boil water in a few minutes, and don't make any smoke. They're my primary source since I know exactly how long they last. I've used wood and firestarters as well, but those requires more supervision

Other people will disagree with me but with everything going on nowadays, consider adding a chest seal and a tourniquet to the first aid, consider getting training on how to use them.
Definitely, and I think you're right on. Any specific recommendations for a good TQ?

Is that a single strap pack or two strap?
Two strap

Does the big pouch on one side of the pack make the pack feel uneven after a couple of miles?
No, the stove is aluminum and really light. I'm a huge fan of it!

I'd stick the spoon inside the pack somewhere, keep it in the original plastic so it's decently clean when you eat.
Good call! I get ripped on for having those spoons, usually until one of my friends on a camping trip has to barehand his chili off of a paper plate.

Considered a water bladder? That's my preferred method for carrying water if I'm walking, easier than having to open a pack every time you're thirsty.
The pack has a spot that's supposed to fit a CamelBak, but it's way too small. That's my biggest gripe about the pack.

Thanks for the feedback! If you have any shelf stable, flameless heater entree options, and TQ recommendations, I'm all ears!

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by madoka » Sat Jul 30, 2016 9:45 pm

I said this before and I'll say it again, a lot of preppers are mistaken about the purpose of a GHB.

20 miles = 6 hours of walking assuming you don't have any disabilities. Walk more briskly, then it's 3.5 hours. If you're capable of jogging, it's 2 hours back home.

In that short period of time, you will not need multiple meals, you will not make camp, you will not start fires, etc.

I know it's not sexy or interesting, but all you really need is some water and good shoes. Throw in a first aid kid and a face mask if you're afraid there will be a lot of smoke. Maybe a change of clothes depending on weather. That's pretty much it.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by ManInBlack316 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 10:06 pm

Madoka,
20 miles really isn't that long of a walk if you HAVE to walk it correct, but I think many throw some food and other supplies in a GHB because you never know if something will be in the way and your have to make a detour. Maybe you also have somebody traveling with you, my wife just doesn't carry food in her EDC bag, so I'm carrying food for two.

Echo,
I have boxes and boxes of MREs that I acquired from the Guard, so I keep MREs in the trunk of the car. I need to pick up some cliff bars to keep in my EDC bag. So I'd have probably three MREs meals and some cliff bars in my GHB. Source for flameless heaters:
https://www.thereadystore.com/mre-flameless-heater
One hack I've heard of is fill those beverage bags with water and then put them in the flameless heater to warm up water for the mountain house meals, never tried it myself so I don't know how good it will work.

I'm a fan of the CATs, only because I'm afraid of change :awesome: Heard good things about the SOFTT too, don't know if I trust any of the others for one handed use and durability in a pack.

They make smaller versions of the camelbak bladders: https://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-MIL-SPE ... idote+50oz
I don't know if it'll fit in your pack though. Could also use a Platypus bottle with a hose:
https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-07045-D ... +with+hose
https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-PlusBot ... pus+bottle

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by madoka » Sun Jul 31, 2016 3:25 am

ManInBlack316 wrote:Madoka,
20 miles really isn't that long of a walk if you HAVE to walk it correct, but I think many throw some food and other supplies in a GHB because you never know if something will be in the way and your have to make a detour. Maybe you also have somebody traveling with you, my wife just doesn't carry food in her EDC bag, so I'm carrying food for two.
The problem is that preppers are often too infatuated with fantasy scenarios that will never happen.

I've walked 10-20 miles plenty of times. And each time, my overriding thought is to pack as light as possible because lugging around useless things sucks.

There will never be some scenario where some disaster is so sudden and so severe as to prevent use of cars, block roadways, and force you to walk through days of desolate, hostile terrain to get back home. There will be plenty of convenience stores, gas stations, and restaurants on your route back home for 99% of us. They won't immediately stop selling because a disaster happened. Plus, if you really can't walk for a few hours without having to eat full meals, then you've got bigger problems.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Stercutus » Sun Jul 31, 2016 3:54 am

The philosophy here has always been to respect whatever scenario the OP dreams up and wants to prepare for. If he thinks that MA is going to get hit with a huge sudden ice storm that knocks out power to the region and make roads impassable then that is his problem set.

Come to think of it I imagine that will happen at some point.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Doryman » Sun Jul 31, 2016 6:41 am

madoka wrote:I said this before and I'll say it again, a lot of preppers are mistaken about the purpose of a GHB.

20 miles = 6 hours of walking assuming you don't have any disabilities. Walk more briskly, then it's 3.5 hours. If you're capable of jogging, it's 2 hours back home.

In that short period of time, you will not need multiple meals, you will not make camp, you will not start fires, etc.

I know it's not sexy or interesting, but all you really need is some water and good shoes. Throw in a first aid kid and a face mask if you're afraid there will be a lot of smoke. Maybe a change of clothes depending on weather. That's pretty much it.

I agree. I'd cut the bag down by half.

At most

- one MRE
- One bottle of water
- one lighter/pack of matches
- a poncho
- a map (even a road map would be fine)
- a light
- An extra warmth layer (during) winter
- a knife or multitool, if you don't habitually wear one already.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by modustollens » Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:41 am

I failed to see your extra socks, something that will be welcomed if you have "to hoof it."

You should add at least a pair of hiking or boot socks and a pair of liner socks, maybe two pairs if the weather is foul, perhaps even a pair of gore-tex liner socks.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Murph » Sun Jul 31, 2016 11:36 am

Hey there Echo!
It looks like you've got a good start and are on the right track! My recommendation would be to see how much everything weighs using a scale when it's packed up. There are a number of options out there that could help you cut down the weight of your pack, which in turn makes it more comfortable to carry, and makes whatever distance you have to hike less strenuous. Here's some suggestions:

FOOD
2x Ramen --Ditch these, they don't have much nutriounal value, replace with a PowerBar or such.
1x SOS or Datrex Lifeboat Rations --Again, you'd probably be better off with a PowerBar

WATER
2x Nalgene 48 ounces --These bottles are heavy even empty compared to a CamelBak that will fit the pack, or Playtus soft bottles
1x Aquamira Water Filter --While these are small and light, they're pretty useless. Look into the Sawyer Squeeze

FIRE
1x Magnesium bar --Ditch it, and get WetFire or Esbit cubes
2x Disposable canteen stove with 3x apiece alcohol gel --If you like the Volcano stove, you don't need a second one.
2x Sterno cans --Again ditch it, and get WetFire or Esbit cubes

FIRST AID
1x Israeli Bandage --Like someone else said, look into a TQ and other trauma supplies. CAT and SOFTT-W have been proven effective by medical studies.

I hope that helps! If you have any questions I'll do my best to answer.
Does your BOB at least have: water, basic tools, fire, food, first-aid kit, and shelter?
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by taipan821 » Sun Jul 31, 2016 5:45 pm

Hello echo

Ditto on the GHB diet

Food: how much do you eat usually during exertion, do you always find out you have extra food after a 20mile hike? consider repacking the food to be snack heavy and meal light: you will walk 20 miles quicker without needing to stop for food, also with regards to your freeze fried meals it might lighten your load (and time taken) to ditch them and go with a MRE/flameless heater combo.

Water: collapsible containers (platypus, sawyer pouches, evernew) are all much lighter than the Nalgene bottles, can conform to pack shape usually and can be adapted to fill the role of hydration system, if going lightweight aquiramira in small bottles is light and effective, but an inline filter such as sawyer squeeze/mini means you don't have to wait before drinking. Again how much water do you drink doing 20 miles?

Shelter:
have you tested your shelter system? quite a few people here have commentated on the time taken to complete 20 miles, do you need to overnight during your 20mile hike or can you push on?

Fire/Cooking
do you need a stove?, what are you cooking? Why do you need two stoves? there are lighter and more simple options out there (soda can stove). you also could replace the sterno fuel with solid fuel (hexamine/trioxane) which would be a lighter option and carry a box of storm matches as backup. Again how often do you need to cook on your 20mile hike, is it something you can do without?

First Aid:
what are the likely injuries you are expecting during your 20 miles? can you improvise dressings? An Israeli bandage can make for an effective improvised tourniquet if need be.

Signal/Accessories
Ditch the strobe style firework if you already have a strobe, can you ditch the roll of tape and wrap some onto an old credit card? do you need 100' of paracord? is a big knife really needed?

Does it work?
Have you gone on a 20mile hike to see if your setup works? what did you use and what was left in the bag? I recommend reading some books on ultralight hiking to help you lighten your load

Less weight = less bulk = lighter pack = more miles traveled
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by drop bear » Sun Jul 31, 2016 6:19 pm

Just sort of as I think of it.

I get the theory behind the two stoves. You get this fixation to solve a lot of problems and start carrying more stuff than you immediately need. If you want a pre set fuel and a wood stove. You can find some rocks. Dig a little hole and put some coat hanger wires across that will hold the one pot I have ever needed to cook with. Then just use a small alcohol or hexamine stove.

You can sharpen the wires and you have some crappy tent pegs.

You could then carry an ultralight poncho that will make the bivy a bit more bearable to sleep in.(I also carry a mosquito net. But that is determined by your location.

My biggest issue there is making sure I have a mat to sleep on. I haven't found a way around that.

Things I hate. Stuffing around getting a fire started. So I will pack some pre made barbecue starters which speeds that up.

Food. You pack mabye one or two meals. Then the rest in a separate bag. You can waddle out with all your gear or walk out with the bare essentials it gives you a bit of flexibility.

I pack a bit of water and also pack a cheap collapsible container. Again it is heavy nothing you can do about that.

Probably a battery style phone charger will be better just in case there is nothing to plug it in to. And I usually carry an am/FM radio because if it is a disaster you will want to know what is going on.

Sunscreen,mosquito, repellant,money,spare house and car keys.

For myself I get floods so it could be 6 to 8 hours of hanging around before I could begin to cross that 20 mile distance

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Delsaw » Mon Aug 01, 2016 4:30 pm

Echo, thanks for sharing the kit. I had a longer reply, but the browser crashed before I could submit. Here are the high points of what I learned from doing a 23 mile ruck/hike two weeks ago along a rural to urban paved trail with about 20 other dudes. It was hot and humid here in NC. It took us 6.5 hours of 15 minute mile pace. 1 30 min break, otherwise non stop fast walking. I had about 30 plus pound pack.

1) Hydrate. Looks like you got that covered, but bladders are easier to drink from while walking, but wouldn't worry about changing what you got unless you want to.
2) Electrolyte. I like Nuun tablets.
3) Food. I burned about 4K calories. Only at about 1000 or so during the hike, but after before and after. Food you can eat on the go is good. But MH is light, so wouldn't be bad to have if you need to stop for the night or for other scenarios where you would use your bag (stuck with the car in a snow storm, etc.)
4) Sugar. Great to have if you are pushing it and need a little boost before you hit the wall. Grab some Gels that have caffeine for an extra boost. But skittles or something like that are good too.
5) Feet. A pair of extra socks are good.
6) More Feet. Grab some Luekotape. Walking 20 miles, even if you are in good shape, willl beat your feet up unless you do it everyday. Any pavement will make it even worst. Tape the part of your feet that will likely get blisters, before you start walking.

All of that needed stuff doesn't have to weigh much, and you could probably do a jog and walk deal and get home fast if all the other conditions are good.

-Delsaw

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Wraith6761 » Mon Aug 01, 2016 5:30 pm

Responses are in red.
echo83 wrote:FOOD
1x Mountain House Chili Mac with Beef
1x Mountain House Mexican Style Beef
2x Ramen
1x SOS or Datrex Lifeboat Rations
5x Honey packets
2x MRE accessory packets (coffee, matches, gum, seasoning)
2x Spoon
I'd cut this down a lot, maybe to just 1 MH meal and some Clif bars. I say leave the MH meal in place, as an option in case your emergency scenario ends up happening late at night, and you decide to hunker down with the car til morning...at least you'd have a hot meal before setting out.

WATER
2x Nalgene 48 ounces
1x Aquamira Water Filter
2x Beverage Base Powder
Soft bottles would probably be the better (or at least lighter) option here...aquamira filter? or is that the drops? If it's the drops, remember that they do expire, and you'll need to keep an eye on them.

SHELTER
3x Contractor Bags
1x HeatSheets Emergency Bivy
1x Goretex Pants
1x Goretex Jacket
Personally, I'd drop the bags for a decent tarp, or even a large sheet of Tyvek...lighter and more capable than the bags are for shelter. Though with the distances you're discussing, I don't know if I see taking a shelter as something that's really needed...if you're thinking of sheltering in the car, a space blanket (or a wool blanket) would do more for you than the bags would. I'd leave that stuff behind if hoofing it (keep the jacket and pants, weather protection is good stuff to have with you).

FIRE
1x Magnesium bar
1x Bic lighter
2x Disposable canteen stove with 3x apiece alcohol gel
2x Sterno cans
1x Swiss Volcano Stove (1 stove, 1 corked bottle, 1 cup)
I'd just keep the bic, and the volcano stove (or just get a small esbit stove), for the above mentioned MH meal scenario. Otherwise, I'd leave it in the car when setting off (well, the stove at least, probably not the lighter).

FIRST AID
1x AMK Ultralight 1-4 person, 1-4 day kit http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/med ... ght-9.html
1x Israeli Bandage
2x toilet paper
1x Spare contacts
1x phone charger

ACCESSORIES/SIGNAL
1x TacTikka+ headlamp
1x Mirror
1x 100’ 550 cord
1x strobe-style firework
1x strobe LED
1x towel
1x Gorilla Tape
1x Gerber Big Rock
I'm sorry, but you don't need 100' of rope in a GHB, or even in a BOB...maybe I could see it in an INCH, assuming you're getting dropped off on your own personal Lian Yu, but short of that it's not needed. Same goes with the firework.
Overall, not bad at all. Just make sure you get some time out in the dirt walking with it and testing all of it. Thanks for sharing it with us.
madoka wrote:20 miles = 6 hours of walking assuming you don't have any disabilities. The average person walks at 3 mph across a flat surface (depending on height/weight and other factors), so it's closer to a 7 hour walk already...adding in time for occasionally stopping to stretch, scratch your balls, eat a snack, drink some water, deal with an obstacle, whatever, it's likely to go over 7 hours. Very doable in a day, yes, and very unlikely to need a shelter or a fire or whatnot. Walk more briskly, then it's 3.5 hours. Um, that works out to about a 6 mph "walk" speed, which is the same pace that the average marathoner is maintaining (source: https://www.verywell.com/how-long-does- ... on-2911423)...and they generally ain't walking. If you're capable of jogging, it's 2 hours back home. I'm sorry, normally I don't do this, but I'm calling keyboard commando bullshit on this. That "jog" would be at 10 mph, which is getting pretty close to a sprint for an average person. Yeah, maybe if the OP is an Olympic marathoner, he/she could keep that up for 20 miles, but an average person, not a chance in hell.
madoka wrote:There will never be some scenario where some disaster is so sudden and so severe as to prevent use of cars, block roadways, and force you to walk through days of desolate, hostile terrain to get back home. There will be plenty of convenience stores, gas stations, and restaurants on your route back home for 99% of us. They won't immediately stop selling because a disaster happened.
So apparently you've never lived in either the rural country (where things like stores and gas stations are not close by) or in an area that's prone to things like flash flooding, mudslides, freak blizzards, ice storms, Nor'easters, earthquakes, forest fires, tornadoes, etc....all of those things do have the potential to frak up roadways and prevent you from driving somewhere, as does something as simple as car trouble. Yes, stores and restaurants won't stop selling things, but it's very likely that they can run out of things to sell, or that the staff can't make it to the store/restaurant/whatever to open it for business to begin with.

Yes, some people are a little too in love with the idea of Mad Max/The Road/Book of Eli/Fallout scenarios (which are extremely unlikely), but that does not counter the fact that there are realistic scenarios that can/will force people out of the comfort zone of zipping along in their car on a nice sunny day. Shit happens. That's why people prep; they prep for whatever they think they may have to deal with.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by madoka » Tue Aug 02, 2016 2:42 am

Wraith6761 wrote: The average person walks at 3 mph across a flat surface (depending on height/weight and other factors), so it's closer to a 7 hour walk already...adding in time for occasionally stopping to stretch, scratch your balls, eat a snack, drink some water, deal with an obstacle, whatever, it's likely to go over 7 hours. Very doable in a day, yes, and very unlikely to need a shelter or a fire or whatnot.
Check your math. The preferred walking speed is 3.1 MPH, which means a little over 6 hours. But whether 6 or 7 hours, you're not making camp on someone's lawn, you're not starting fires, and if under your fantasy scenarios, since for whatever reason you just NEED to get home, then you're probably not taking the time to make dinner and you're probably walking with a sense of purpose. So you can quibble about the exact pace, but my point stands.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preferred_walking_speed
Wraith6761 wrote: Um, that works out to about a 6 mph "walk" speed, which is the same pace that the average marathoner is maintaining (source: https://www.verywell.com/how-long-does- ... on-2911423)...and they generally ain't walking. If you're capable of jogging, it's 2 hours back home. I'm sorry, normally I don't do this, but I'm calling keyboard commando bullshit on this. That "jog" would be at 10 mph, which is getting pretty close to a sprint for an average person. Yeah, maybe if the OP is an Olympic marathoner, he/she could keep that up for 20 miles, but an average person, not a chance in hell.
You realize that your link disproves what you are saying right? Even old people can walk 26 miles in 8 hours. Which again proves my point, that you don't need to carry around a bunch of useless junk. A point that you seem to have missed.

The AVERAGE male JOGS at 8.3 MPH. That again, means that you can JOG home in about 2.4 hours.

https://www.reference.com/health/fast-c ... 5aaee7ab11#
The average man jogs at a speed of 8.3 miles per hour
Wraith6761 wrote: So apparently you've never lived in either the rural country (where things like stores and gas stations are not close by) or in an area that's prone to things like flash flooding, mudslides, freak blizzards, ice storms, Nor'easters, earthquakes, forest fires, tornadoes, etc....
I guess you missed the part where I wrote for 99% of us living in urban areas. But please, enlighten me of a time when people were actually forced to walk home an extended distance under such conditions instead of staying put until it was safer to travel.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Stercutus » Tue Aug 02, 2016 2:53 am

The AVERAGE male JOGS at 8.3 MPH. That again, means that you can JOG home in about 2.4 hours.
Not a chance although I can see your confusion based on that source.

That is almost a 7 minute mile. A younger guy in shape might be able to to that but an average American male? No way. I am basing this on my experiences in the military. Very few men over the age of 30 were running at that pace on their PT test, which only goes on for two miles. Less than 1% in the over 40 crowd. They were by far in better shape than the average civilian who tend to be overweight and exercise much less. There is no way the average Joe could do it for 20 miles straight carrying a pack.


http://www.livestrong.com/article/52635 ... r-jogging/

Many people can walk briskly up to 4.5 mph without having to break into a jog to maintain the pace, according to data from Harvard Health Publications. Once your speed eclipses 6 mph, according to running coach Mike Antoniades, as quoted in a BBC Sport article, your workout technically shifts from a jog to a run. As such, a very small window for jogging exists. Theoretically, your jogging speed should average between 5 and 6 mph.
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by 50 Mission Cap » Tue Aug 02, 2016 5:52 am

So apparently you've never lived in either the rural country (where things like stores and gas stations are not close by) or in an area that's prone to things like flash flooding, mudslides, freak blizzards, ice storms, Nor'easters, earthquakes, forest fires, tornadoes, etc....all of those things do have the potential to frak up roadways and prevent you from driving somewhere, as does something as simple as car trouble. Yes, stores and restaurants won't stop selling things, but it's very likely that they can run out of things to sell, or that the staff can't make it to the store/restaurant/whatever to open it for business to begin with.
I clearly remember the Blizzard of '78 in northern Ohio/southern Michigan. It was just nucking futs. School was cancelled for 2 weeks straight. 8 and 12 foot drifts. For many the power was out for a week or more. Snowmobiles and snow shoes were the only modes of transportation. When they finally got our rural road cleared we were literally driving through a canyon. The only difference today is that we would have more warning/better prediction but that wouldn't change the effects.

So yeah I'm a survivalist nut job but if my truck gets buried in drift for three days I want to have something to drink and a little something to eat and a way to keep from freezing to death.

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Murph » Tue Aug 02, 2016 7:56 am

lol. It's really irrelevant to argue about how fast one can crawl/walk/run. Everyone has their own level of fitness, own amount of gear, own footwear, own terrain to deal with, own weather conditions, own disaster conditions, own starting time, etc...

I will say this though: Whatever pace you think you can do, it'll be less.
Does your BOB at least have: water, basic tools, fire, food, first-aid kit, and shelter?
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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by drop bear » Tue Aug 02, 2016 8:28 am

madoka wrote:
Wraith6761 wrote: The average person walks at 3 mph across a flat surface (depending on height/weight and other factors), so it's closer to a 7 hour walk already...adding in time for occasionally stopping to stretch, scratch your balls, eat a snack, drink some water, deal with an obstacle, whatever, it's likely to go over 7 hours. Very doable in a day, yes, and very unlikely to need a shelter or a fire or whatnot.
Check your math. The preferred walking speed is 3.1 MPH, which means a little over 6 hours. But whether 6 or 7 hours, you're not making camp on someone's lawn, you're not starting fires, and if under your fantasy scenarios, since for whatever reason you just NEED to get home, then you're probably not taking the time to make dinner and you're probably walking with a sense of purpose. So you can quibble about the exact pace, but my point stands.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preferred_walking_speed
Wraith6761 wrote: Um, that works out to about a 6 mph "walk" speed, which is the same pace that the average marathoner is maintaining (source: https://www.verywell.com/how-long-does- ... on-2911423)...and they generally ain't walking. If you're capable of jogging, it's 2 hours back home. I'm sorry, normally I don't do this, but I'm calling keyboard commando bullshit on this. That "jog" would be at 10 mph, which is getting pretty close to a sprint for an average person. Yeah, maybe if the OP is an Olympic marathoner, he/she could keep that up for 20 miles, but an average person, not a chance in hell.
You realize that your link disproves what you are saying right? Even old people can walk 26 miles in 8 hours. Which again proves my point, that you don't need to carry around a bunch of useless junk. A point that you seem to have missed.

The AVERAGE male JOGS at 8.3 MPH. That again, means that you can JOG home in about 2.4 hours.

https://www.reference.com/health/fast-c ... 5aaee7ab11#
The average man jogs at a speed of 8.3 miles per hour
Wraith6761 wrote: So apparently you've never lived in either the rural country (where things like stores and gas stations are not close by) or in an area that's prone to things like flash flooding, mudslides, freak blizzards, ice storms, Nor'easters, earthquakes, forest fires, tornadoes, etc....
I guess you missed the part where I wrote for 99% of us living in urban areas. But please, enlighten me of a time when people were actually forced to walk home an extended distance under such conditions instead of staying put until it was safer to travel.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-22/m ... ds/7049240

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Re: Critique echo83's Get Home Bag

Post by Asymetryczna » Tue Aug 02, 2016 9:02 am

I like the ebb and flow of this thread; so, thanks E83 for asking your question. Having no idea of where you live I cannot accurately offer much by way of suggestion. I do not know the weather, terrain, or local situation. You should use the roadside assistance. If you must abandon the company car, I recommend calling a friend for a ride or using public transportation like a bus. Don't wait around unless the link up is a surety. If you must go on foot, consider good shoes. Walk distances greater than you will need to in order to train your body and your mind. Your vehicle can carry more than you can so plan storage accordingly. The only water/food carrier that truly matters is your belly, so fuel up before stepping off and carry what you can.

I would first (now) do a good map analysis and draw a 30 mile radius around your home if you determine that you will seldom be outside of those limits. Then, make a small scale copy with waypoints along your safest, or quickest, or most concealed, etc., routes. Become familiar with all of it.

Don't walk though if you can get a ride.
It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.
Henry David Thoreau

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