Handicapped loved ones

A place to discuss special considerations involved prepping and reacting to a disaster with children, pets and other family concerns.

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SeerSavant
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by SeerSavant » Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:53 am

This is a great post so far, I understand the clotting issues, but my mother has a severely low platelet count and in ten years they have never figured out the cause.
She is spleenless, and has had times where she needed platelet infusions to keep her from bleeding out.
It comes and goes, but I believe it is on par with some extreme cases of hemophilia.

Does anyone know any food or medical supply that can, even temporarily increase platelet production?



I wish I could add or give advice, but other than some hospice volunteering when I was younger but with terminal patients. Well, even simple conversations, listening, can make a difference, but it is far too frustrating to do it full time.
Enough about that.


This is a quality thread, it should be maintained.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by Stercutus » Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:31 am

I wonder, does your mom take a lot of aspirin? I would assume a doctor would ask that question but maybe not. Aspirin will definitely lower platelet count. Older men who take aspirin for the heart can run into this problem.
Does anyone know any food or medical supply that can, even temporarily increase platelet production?
From E-How:
How to Increase Platelets by Eating
By Susan Raphael, eHow Contributor
updated: September 4, 2010
I want to do this! What's This?
Blueberries can help increase your blood platelet count.
Blueberries can help increase your blood platelet count.
berries image by Horticulture from Fotolia.com

The bone marrow is the "factory" that produces blood platelets in your body. A low platelet count means your body may have a weak immune system and does not have enough blood-clotting ability.

Certain medications, chemotherapy, some illnesses and an impaired immune system can lower your platelet count. In most cases, rest and good eating habits can increase your platelet count.
Difficulty: Easy
Instructions
Things You'll Need:

* Cod liver oil, flax seed oil or walnut oil
* Omega-3 foods such as tuna and salmon
* Green, leafy vegetables
* Berries such as raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and blackberries
* Tomatoes
* Low-fat red meat
* Potato skins, apples, beetroot, squash and beets

1. Replace fats and oils with healthy oils such as cod liver oil, flax seed oil or walnut oil containing Omega-3 fatty acids. These oils are even better not cooked. Walnut oil and flax seed oil make terrific salad dressings.
2. Increase the amount of tuna and salmon in your diet; these foods are rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, have few calories and are an excellent source of protein and iron. Fresh tuna and salmon are preferable to canned, but canned is preferable to omitting these two fish from your diet.
3. Add several servings of green leafy vegetables each day. These include lettuces, spinach, broccoli, kale and collard greens, which are all high in antioxidants. If you can eat these vegetables raw, it is best; but it is better to eat them cooked rather than avoid them. Try parboiling them to retain as much of the nutrients as possible.
4. Include raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and blackberries as well as other berries to your diet. These fruits are full of phytonutrients that enhance health in general and building platelet count specifically.
5. Eat fresh tomatoes as often as possible. They contain the antioxidant lycopene, vitamins, minerals and resveratrol. All these substances are essential to good health.
6. Add low-fat red meat to your diet. Liver is an amazing source of vitamins and iron. If you can develop a taste for it, your blood will be healthier for it. Lean beef cuts are also high in iron and other blood-fortifying nutrients.
7. Introduce potato skins, apples (any color), beetroot, squash and beets gradually into your diet. Containing nutrients that will help improve your platelet count, these foods build up stores of nutrients in your bones' marrow.


Read more: How to Increase Platelets by Eating | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_6929638_increas ... z15GrcmpRx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by SeerSavant » Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:56 am

thank you,

I'm gonna start printing these posts and create a journal of sorts, maybe a loose leaf binder to hold all of these things...

You never know..
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by Tater Raider » Mon Nov 15, 2010 10:22 am

Assuming the disability is mobility and you are looking at some way to exercise/human powered (ie: secondary) bug-out vehicle then I do have something I can add:
http://industrialbicycles.com/Special%20Needs.htm
http://industrialbicycles.com/Kettwiesel_Allround.htm
http://industrialbicycles.com/Kettwiese ... omfort.htm

Note that the Kettwiesel can be connected to another Kettwiesel or delta recumbent tricycle with a hitch. You remove the front wheel and hook it onto the connector to make a train like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dT4XbM4v ... re=related

Ketts are the most versitile in setting up for special needs, mobility and balance-wise, but you will pay for that quality and customer service is not the greatest. The Hostel Shoppe, Jacks Bikes and Fitness (industrialbicycles.com), and Utah Trikes are 3 places I would not hesitate to send you to as I know first hand 2 have great customer service and have heard many good things about the other.

If the mobility restriction is too much for even that, may I suggest something along these lines:
http://www.tonystrailers.com/vehiclesfordisabled/

Just remember, disabled doesn't mean unable. There are challenges and special considerations to be made, sure, but with a bit of skull sweat and tenacity you can make plans that work when dealing with preps, fitness, and just flat-out enjoying life.

Hope I've been helpful.

EtA: There is a whole other thread dealing with the mentally ill in a ZPAW in the WWYD section. I like that thread as well , but it provokes even more questions and fewer answers.

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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by Fenris » Sat Nov 20, 2010 10:19 pm

For those loved ones who are wheelchair bound, this may be an alternative: http://www.renegadewheelchairs.com/index.php

My daughter was recently born with a lower-lumbar case of spinabifida, and now I'm looking to the future to see what I can do for her to help her get around by herself.

I'll probably be watching this subject with interest.

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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:40 am

I have a sister who has CP, and has been in a wheelchair her entire life. As a result, I've had quite a bit of experience with wheelchairs in general, and her in particular. For Thanksgiving and Christmas, I make arrangements with the group home she lives in, to have her dropped off and picked up at my place, so she can spend the holidays with family. Until we moved to a downstairs apartment, even this was an impossibility, so we're glad to be able to have her over, now. Our front porch steps down four steps to the city sidewalk, and to do even that, the steps are built with a cutout into the porch surface. So, building a ramp is out, because of the city sidewalk, and making one for temporary use is also out, because of no place to store it. Also, she normally uses an electric wheelchair, and if you've never tried moving one of those up a step or two, you're lucky- they are HEAVY! To help out on this, for visits she comes in a manual chair, so there's much less weight to lift up the steps.

We are planning on installing a permanent ramp when we buy the farm, but that is still in the future, and does us no good right now. Should the TEOTWAWKI occur, I honestly do not know what I can or could do to help her out. She lives about 30 miles away from us now, and it will be close to 50 when we get the farm. My first thought is that she would be better off left where she is, since "surely the state run home will have a plan", but experience has taught me that this is a false hope at best- they don't seem to "have a plan" for the best of days, let alone an "oh shit" emergency. This leaves me with the conundrum of figuring out how to go and get her, then care for her once I have.

Her CP is severe enough that she has little voluntary movement, and surgeries in the past to help alleviate her pain have left her with no chance of ever walking again, and the rods in her spine make handling her a special operation in itself- she simply cannot be bent at all. Fifty + years in a wheelchair has left her muscles so atrophied, that she can no longer even try to help as she once did, when moving her in/out of the chair.

To look at the situation in a purely logical sense, group survival says to leave her where she is, and to let those in charge fend for her as best they can, but I can NOT make myself accept this as an option. It simply isn't a choice. My fiancee' is great with her, and helps as she can, but none of us in the family is properly trained in full time care for her, nor are we equipped to do so. These are all obstacles I need to find ways of overcoming.

I, too, will be following this thread- it looks like it may turn into quite a good topic of discussion.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:55 am

Vicarious_Lee wrote:...
1. SETUP AND COSTS

So you or yours has been recently disabled and has impaired mobility. Unfortunately, things will get expensive, and common fixes to things that would come as a prescription are horrifyingly expensive. Your home must be set up to accommodate this disability. The more you rely on ingenuity, Home Depot, and internet message boards for people with the same problems the more you'll come out less poor here.
...
1. Remove rugs, transitions, floor texture changes, and minimize uneven surfaces in the home.

2. Any ramp into a home needs to have (optimally) 1" rise for 12" of run. They can be bought, or they can be built. They can be built cheaper.


2. BATHING

In our American Society, being clean is awesome. We have a love affair with soap, and I think that's sweet. I do not have studies that can prove this, but I have anecdotal evidence that being clean can literally reduce a persons pain levels, as well as making them feel more human. Some ideas for DIY adaptations:

Install grab bars (available at hardware stores). Put a non-stick mat in the tub. Get a shower seat from the local pharmacy.

Install something like this. It was 50 bucks, and went on in 10 minutes (my wife recently split her patella in half).

If there's a 2-story house (like I had) it's cheaper to figure out how to do a bath downstairs when their isn't one, instead of installing a lift, or having one installed. A sponge bath in the kitchen can be done, and approaches 75% of "cleanliness" of a shower. This helps in an acute mobility impairment as well as long-term.

In the hyperacute phase, I've leaned on these with good results. There are many other options out there for both short and long-term.
...
Good points, all. The 1"/12" rule is a part of the ADA requirements for ramps.
When installing grab bars, be sure that they are mounted into wall studs, or, more ideally, a 2X6 mounted flat across the studs of the wall (the studs need to be notched for this). The 2X6 provides a constant, solid surface for mounting these type of things securely, and does not limit you to where the studs happen to be. If you are installing or upgrading a downstairs bathroom, you might as well do this while you have the walls stripped down. A 2X6 can also be mounted on top of the un-notched studs behind bath/shower surrounds- most of them have a space behind them that will work out nicely for this. If you are doing tile, or a flat surround, go with the notched studs method- properly done, you will lose no structural strength from them, as the 2X6 should completely fill the space you've made in them.
If you install a hand-held shower head (these are great, regardless), be sure to provide a way of mounting it lower, for someone seated to reach- don't stick with the normal shower head location only.
In my career in construction, I've had to study and memorize much of the ADA requirements, especially where they pertained to baths and kitchens, since I am a plumber by trade. The information can be found online here: http://www.access-board.gov/ada/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; . Following these will most likely also comply with your local codes, but it's best to check first, last, and always. When in doubt, go with whichever one seems the most strict or demanding- it's likely to be the better choice all around. And, you can't get fined for EXCEEDING local code requirements.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by Hiker72 » Thu Dec 09, 2010 9:19 am

KnightoftheRoc wrote:I have a sister who has CP, and has been in a wheelchair her entire life. As a result, I've had quite a bit of experience with wheelchairs in general, and her in particular. For Thanksgiving and Christmas, I make arrangements with the group home she lives in, to have her dropped off and picked up at my place, so she can spend the holidays with family. Until we moved to a downstairs apartment, even this was an impossibility, so we're glad to be able to have her over, now. Our front porch steps down four steps to the city sidewalk, and to do even that, the steps are built with a cutout into the porch surface. So, building a ramp is out, because of the city sidewalk, and making one for temporary use is also out, because of no place to store it. Also, she normally uses an electric wheelchair, and if you've never tried moving one of those up a step or two, you're lucky- they are HEAVY! To help out on this, for visits she comes in a manual chair, so there's much less weight to lift up the steps.

We are planning on installing a permanent ramp when we buy the farm, but that is still in the future, and does us no good right now. Should the TEOTWAWKI occur, I honestly do not know what I can or could do to help her out. She lives about 30 miles away from us now, and it will be close to 50 when we get the farm. My first thought is that she would be better off left where she is, since "surely the state run home will have a plan", but experience has taught me that this is a false hope at best- they don't seem to "have a plan" for the best of days, let alone an "oh shit" emergency. This leaves me with the conundrum of figuring out how to go and get her, then care for her once I have.

Her CP is severe enough that she has little voluntary movement, and surgeries in the past to help alleviate her pain have left her with no chance of ever walking again, and the rods in her spine make handling her a special operation in itself- she simply cannot be bent at all. Fifty + years in a wheelchair has left her muscles so atrophied, that she can no longer even try to help as she once did, when moving her in/out of the chair.

To look at the situation in a purely logical sense, group survival says to leave her where she is, and to let those in charge fend for her as best they can, but I can NOT make myself accept this as an option. It simply isn't a choice. My fiancee' is great with her, and helps as she can, but none of us in the family is properly trained in full time care for her, nor are we equipped to do so. These are all obstacles I need to find ways of overcoming.

I, too, will be following this thread- it looks like it may turn into quite a good topic of discussion.

I have an ex-girlfriend with a 10 year old daughter with severe CP. She can't do anything for herself and requires constant care. My ex though was a prepper before she even knew what it meant. She hoarded supplies like the stores were shutting down tomorrow. The last I knew, I believe she had roughly a months worth of food and medicine on hand for the daughter though not as much for herself.

She also does a pretty good job of finding out/keeping track as much as possible about all medical procedures that is done. She uses a laptop to access these, but she also has everything on paper as well.

Her next goal is to make her house as self sufficient as possible. I haven't spoken to her in a while about this so I'm not sure how far along she is with it. Essentially the biggest thing she wanted was an emergency generator installed.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by Bonecrusher Doc » Sun Dec 12, 2010 12:33 pm

Great thread. I'll chip in my 2 cents as a physical therapist, but I would say those of you who actually have mobility challenges or loved ones with mobility challenges have been there and done that, so feel free to correct me.

First of all, my opinion is that folks with mobility challenges should avoid bad situations, have an early threshold for evacuation, and rehearse just like the rest of us for both bugging in and bugging out.

Talking about crutches and quad canes and such... I think you should just stick with whatever your loved one uses everyday. I highly doubt they're going to want to switch from their usual trusty quad cane to some high-tech nordic walking sticks in a moment of crisis.

I think covering any significant distance by foot in rough terrain is going to be very challenging for anyone who needs crutches/cane/walking stick. It's not just a matter of losing your balance and falling down - it's the increased energy/oxygen cost of walking with poor balance. And crutches are way less efficient than normal walking. Even 82d Airborne paratroopers get winded just walking a couple of blocks on crutches.

Thinking back to pictures/video I've seen of refugees fleeing various bad scenarios like war, flood, etc - any young children or frail elderly were in wagons and carts. I think a wheelbarrow would get old really fast - you always have to be lifting up and keeping it balanced. Anybody want to volunteer to rehearse various people-carrying devices and tell us how it goes?

Even if you're helping somebody with a wagon, you'll still need to help them get up/down. Remember that frail people, people with strokes, etc. may not have the stability in their shoulders that healthy people have - if you lift them up by the armpits, you could possibly dislocate their shoulders. Instead, you should lift them by a gait belt (google it) around their waist.

Prepare for oxygen canisters! People who have been prescribed supplemental oxygen need it; it's not optional. And people who walk with a cane can usually barely drag an oxygen canister on its little wheels around the house, much less outdoors. I don't have any good advice really, maybe somebody else out there can give us some recommendations.

People who normally have mobility challenges will have already figured this stuff out and do it everyday. But something very important to remember is that human body is always working hard to maintain its various state of equilibrium. People with health concerns, such as the elderly, can lose their normal ability to function (or even think straight) really fast due to any of a number of factors that can occur in a bugin/out scenario: a bit too hot or cold, dehydration (remind them to drink!), forgot to take their blood pressure meds, blood sugar gets a bit low or electrolytes get out of whack, or even just psychological distress. So even if Grandpa is a tough old Korean war veteran who hunts and cuts wood and hikes on a regular basis, just remember that his body isn't as resilient to change as a younger person.

Oh, and here's this: http://www.ready.gov/america/getakit/disabled.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by NT2C » Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:06 am

Excellent thread and I'm glad I searched for it!

I was looking for it because, all three of the people I care about most in the world (my wife, my best friend, and myself - (hey...gotta love yourself, right?)) have mobility issues.
In the case of my wife it's bad knees. She's had knee problems ever since she was a teen and had a major growth spurt, but her knee joints didn't grow at the same rate. She was told, way back when she was in her late twenties, that the only thing that could be done was knee replacement surgery, and that they would not do that until she was 50. The reason for that was pretty simple... replacement knees (at that time) were good for only 15-20 years, and a second replacement wasn't possible. Things have changed a lot since then, and just last year (when she was 44) her orthopedic surgeon decided the time was right and to go ahead with the first replacement. That was done early last year and her new knee is great. It's made a world of difference for her, but she still needs to have the left one done. That surgery will likely happen next year, after she finishes her master's degree program. Until then she still uses a cane to get around, and walking is slow for her. Staircases are possible, but one step at a time and it's not fast.

With my best friend, he's a disabled vet whose back was broken in three places while on active duty. He's very fortunate in that he can still walk, but it's with a cane and he can't move very fast. He's on heavy pain meds, simply to function, and even then just a wrong turn or touch can bring him to his knees with pain. This is not a guy you can ever give a pat on the back... he'd be crippled for days.

Then there's myself... I worked a lot of different jobs over my lifetime, but the family business was construction, and it's something I always went back to between other jobs, eventually taking over the business after my dad died. Three years ago I was doing a favor for a friend (my wife's best friend) by installing 2,900 sq.ft. of hardwood floors and making some custom cabinets for her. One day, on the job, I came around a corner and tripped over an air hose that had uncoiled itself across a doorway. That hurt the left knee some but I didn't think it was too bad. The very next day, came around the very same corner and... tripped over the shop-vac that got left in the hallway. That tore the knee up pretty good (how badly I didn't find out until much later) and left me in a lot of pain, but I needed to get the job finished. My business partner at the time (now former business partner) was an alcoholic, who went on a 6 week bender the week before, and the two helpers I'd hired had regular jobs and could only work weekends, so I had to do most of the work myself. So, waited a month before seeing a doctor, while I finished up the job. By the time I saw my wife's orthopedic surgeon it was too late to do what would have been a simple repair (two ruptured tendons, patella tendon and quadriceps) and the only way to fix it at that point was with extensive surgery, donor tendons (question: would donor tendons from a cadaver make me semi-zombie?) and a huge hospital bill. The surgeon was willing to donate his services (we joked that it was a "buy two, get one free" plan - my wife's two knees and then mine) but that still left about $80,000 in hospital costs I couldn't cover since the wife and I hadn't gotten married yet then, and my insurance wouldn't cover it. Anyway, I still haven't had it fixed. The wife and I decided to wait on it until after both her knees are done and she's recovered. I can get around pretty well, without a cane, on level ground and mild terrain, but stairs, like with my wife, are one-at-a-time, and any kind of serious slope other than dry pavement is pretty much impossible, unless I have my walking stick. Then it's "do able" but I'll have aching knees the next day or two.

So, anyway, that's the three of us and our mobility problems. But we also have a lot of strengths. Like me, my buddy is an extra class ham, and very active in emcomm and disaster prep. (During Hurricane Irene he was our only link to one of the county shelters) He's also very self-sufficient, living by himself in a small rented house on a 400 acre farm well off the proverbial beaten path. (He doesn't do the farming, his landlord does) He's also well equipped for any PAW with food, water, shelter, self-defense covered quite adequately. My wife, she's a Fed, an excellent shot, and quite self-reliant, having been raised in northern Idaho and having spent quite a bit of time in field ops for Uncle Sam. Myself, my own qualifications are posted elsewhere on here, and in my user listing, but in my own opinion I'm no slouch either for when the SHTF. Together, the three of us make what I consider to be a formidable team, except for our mobility problems. I've looked over a lot of what's posted here, and while only a small part of it applies to us, it's given me some new ideas to consider and some viewpoints I hadn't fully considered. I'll be watching to see what else you folks contribute to this great thread.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by DarkAxel » Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:23 pm

Incontinence

Something that sometimes comes along with mobility problems is an inability to control urination and defecation. In short, some people in wheelchairs shit and piss on themselves. They can't help it any more than a newborn, and it's important to support your loved one emotionally as well as physically. It took my bro several years to get over the shame of being back in diapers (he's been in them since his accident), and I don't think he would have made it through if we hadn't been understanding and supportive.

Supplies
If you have children, a lot of the stuff you will need is already familiar. Diaper rash ointment, baby powder, and cleaning wipes can all come out of retirement. You'll need more of them, though (adults being markedly bigger than newborns). Adult diapers come in various sizes, and underpads are available to help keep the things they sit on and in dry. My bro's insurance pays for his diapers and underpads (it also pays for a number of other things that really help out, like a hospital-type bed and his wheelchair). I use and stock disposable diapers, so I'll leave the cloth v disposable debate for others.

When building a BOB, make sure to include those things. You parents can knock the dust off of those old diaper bags and use them if you like, or just pack the stuff into a normal backpack or Duffel. The setup I have at home for my bro includes 1 tube of Diaper rash ointment, 1 tube of Neosporin, One large bottle of Baby powder, One 10 count package of XL Adult diapers, one 6 count package of underpads, his meds, and the other regular BOB stuff you'd put in, like food, water, and clothing, but I packed in twice the amount of clothes for him as I did for myself, in case he wets himself and needs his clothes changed, too.

Changing Diapers on an Adult
A lot of you already have experience changing babies, but when it comes to adults, there's a huge difference in how to go about it. I'll describe a method that I learned from the nurses and aides that worked with my bro over the years.

Step One: Remove the fastening tape on the sides of the diaper, pull it back and push it down between the legs, then clean the area well.

Step Two: Roll the person to one side and bunch the diaper as close to their body as you can. Clean their backside well, then lay them back down flat, and roll them the other way. Remove the used diaper and dispose of it properly.

Step Three: With the person still rolled on their side, spread a clean diaper underneath them. Bunch one side up against their body and position the diaper so that when the person lays back down it will be in the proper place.

Step Four: Lay the person back down, and roll them the other way. Now you should be able to spread the diaper out flat on the bed and lay them back down flat (here's where you'd use the baby powders, creams, and whatnot,)

Step Five: Bring the front of the diaper up between their legs, and secure the side tapes.

You can also modify this method to change sheets and underpads if a person is bedbound.

Continuing Care
One advantage that most adults in diapers have over babies is that they can say for sure when they need changed. If your loved one is new to adult diapers, you may need to check them anyway if they seem to have problems coping with their new situation. And for the love of all things sacred and holy, don't let your loved one sit around in their own piss and/or shit. Change them as soon as you know they need changed.
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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by vetvet » Mon Nov 21, 2011 4:39 pm

I think this may be a very important thread. Some of us have loved ones to care for already, but if S.H.T.F, ANY of of us could become disabled in an instant. Rather temporary, or permanent, Transportation of wounded or disabled is something that we all should think about.

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Re: Handicapped loved ones

Post by KnightoftheRoc » Sun Nov 27, 2011 10:25 pm

I have a sister who has been in a wheelchair most of her life. And, most of MY life, I've been moving her in and out of the chair, moving her IN the chair, up stairs and down, whatever it took to get her where she needed to be. Thanksgiving this year was another example of this- she was visiting my house for the holiday.

In order to do this the easiest, I figured we'd bring her in the back door to the kitchen, which is the basement level of the house. To do this, I had to bring her down four steps, and then in the door. While lowering her and the chair down off the last step, I got my foot hung up somehow, and went head first over top of her, just barely managing to set the back of her chair down onto the steps, so she'd be safe from rolling or bouncing. I managed to catch myself at the last second by slamming my arm into a post, raising a nice bruise. Somehow, I had done this without hurting my back (already working 3 disks short of a full stack).

Then, we found that her chair was one inch too wide for the door. I found a wrench that fit,and lifted her out of the chair, and carried her inside to a kitchen chair. That's when I blew out my back- again. In 2006, I spent 8 months on crutches when not flat in bed, having herniated three disks in my back. This felt like I'd blown a fourth.

I managed to get the chair inside and her into it, but I needed help. Right now, Sunday night, I'm still laid up, using crutches to get around when needed, and staying in bed otherwise. I tried to keep my sister from catching on to the injury, because she'd feel guilty about it, even tho there's no way it could be her fault.

So, why bring this up? Well, besides the obvious connection to the topic, a handicapped sister, this experience brought a few things up front and in-focus for me. Namely, that dealing with a handicapped relative is RARELY a one-person job. I screwed up by attempting to handle this alone (and knew better). Also, that even when being cautious, as I thought I was being, you are only one injury away from being a handicapped relative yourself. Even if it's only temporary. If you are the only caregiver in the relationship, you can BOTH end up in some pretty deep doo-doo just by getting hurt.

So, since the alternative of 'setting them adrift' just isn't an option, changes may be needed in order to properly handle a handicapped family member's needs. In my case, it means NOT having my sister over in colder weather (summer BBQ's are still a go), because the house is simply not built to handle it. I HATE being forced into this decision, my sister is important to me, and I like to be able to have family over to my home. Altering my present home isn't in the cards, and her needs aren't going to change either. I'm not planning on being in this house forever (it was apparently built for anorexic pygmys), and the next house I own IS going to have a ramp and adequate doors, so my sister can tool right in the front door, whenever she wants.
silentpoet wrote: My first two warning shots are aimed center of mass. If that don't warn them I fire warning shots at their head until they are warned enough that I am no longer in fear for my life.

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